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Jun
23
comment What does “the assembly of the LORD” refer to?
Welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics Stack Exchange! Be sure to take our site tour to learn more about us. We're a little different from other sites. We're not just interested in what you know, but how you know it. We ask that you show your work or your answer may get edited or even deleted.
Jun
15
comment What were the “tokens of virginity”?
Tigay (JPS Torah Commentary) and Merrill (NAC) both agree. Wenham gives a different interpretation (Wenham, “Bet̆ûlāh—A Girl of Marriageable Age,” Vetus Testamentum 22 (1972): 331–32).
Jun
14
comment How old was Samuel when Hannah took him to the temple?
Welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics. This is a good observation, but you may be interested in this question about the number of children that Hannah had.
Jun
14
comment How many children did Hannah have?
Inspired by this answer.
Jun
13
comment What is the difference in the Kingdom of Heaven and the Kingdom of God?
Jonathan Pennington has a monograph on the topic. He argues against the widely accepted idea that it is merely a circumlocution. Here is a condensed summary he wrote as well.
Jun
13
comment What does “The psalms of David are ended” refer to?
@Susan Sure! Here is one link I found: 11QPs-a
Jun
13
comment What does “The psalms of David are ended” refer to?
@Susan The inscription on the DSS version of Psalm 151 seems to be shorter. Something like: "Hallelujah! A psalm of David, son of Jesse." Or: "A Hallelujah of David, Son of Jesse."
Jun
5
comment What kind of event is being depicted in 1 Thessalonians 4:17?
Welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics. If you have a moment, check out some of our site distinctives. Our site is a Q&A site focused on the interpretation of the Bible. I've edited your question to try to keep it from being closed as off-topic. If the way I've framed it doesn't fit what you're asking, feel free to revert my changes.
Jun
4
comment Who is Matthew's intended audience for the Sermon on the Mount?
@Davïd I tried to write this question in a way to avoid that discussion. It seems to me whether or not Matthew wrote the gospel to his own local community with their particular situation in mind or to a broader church community, it's hard to imagine that he's so partisan that he only thinks Jesus' sermon places ethical demands on disciples in Antioch (or wherever). Or maybe I'm too naive?
Jun
4
comment Who is Matthew's intended audience for the Sermon on the Mount?
@MarkEdward I was merely hoping to avoid with the parenthesis the idea that Matthew has co-opted Jesus' sermon for a different purpose (e.g. that Jesus meant it only for the twelve and only pre-resurrection, but now Matthew intends it for his community post-resurrection). I made a slight change to try to re-focus. As per my comment above, I'm not concerned per se about the disciples in the narrative, but disciples of Jesus post-narrative to whom Matthew writes.
Jun
2
comment Who is Matthew's intended audience for the Sermon on the Mount?
While similar in title to this question, I believe this question concerns the audience external to the narrative, whereas the other question concerns the audience internal to it.
Apr
3
comment What is a “hermeneutics of the letter”?
@Davïd Sure thing. I'm not sure the gloss he gives totally captures his methods; but hopefully it helps. Have you ever read "A Son to Me" or his essay on the typological structure of Matthew? They seem to typify the method he expounds in the book.
Mar
24
comment Did Mark intend to end his gospel at 16:8?
@MatthewMiller For my own part, while I'm pretty convinced that the "long ending" is a later addition to the text, I have no strong convictions as to whether the gospel was intended to end at 16:8 or if there was another lost ending along the lines of what we find in Matthew (so James Edwards in the Pillar series).
Mar
24
comment Did Mark intend to end his gospel at 16:8?
@MatthewMiller Thanks for adding your answer. I do think Mark uses key words at points to link ideas (e.g. the "torn" heavens and the "torn" curtain), so I don't dismiss offhand a possible connection between the "young man" who flees and the one at the tomb (which Joel Marcus considers and rejects). That said, even if these connections are real, I'm not convinced they necessitate the conclusion that 16:8 ends the gospel, and preclude the possibility of a re-union in Galilee. I'm particularly leery of projecting modern techniques like an "open ending" back onto ancient literature.
Mar
10
comment John: A lack of “wisdom” in Wisdom literature?
About the intention concerning the word Sophia
Mar
3
comment Why did Jesus enter Jerusalem on a donkey?
It's interesting when Jehu is anointed king, people spread their cloaks out before him; but he seems to be on foot as best I can tell.
Mar
1
comment What is Jesus' purpose in asking about Psalm 110?
I'd been reading a couple books on Mark lately that assume a low Christology, indeed saw your recent question and it reminded me that I had wanted to ask about this. :)
Feb
28
comment Acts 16:16: Meaning of πύθωνος (Textus Receptus) and πύθωνα (NA28)
@Davïd Yeah, as well, Pervo sees πνεῦμα πύθωνα as redundant - πύθωνα already containing the idea of a spirit - and thinks that explains the correction to πύθωνος in D and P45.
Jan
8
comment What does “reconciling all things” mean in Colossians 1:20?
@JoshuaBigbee I'm in agreement with you. My question is aimed at escaping a facile understanding of that word/phrase.
Jan
8
comment What does “reconciling all things” mean in Colossians 1:20?
@JoshuaBigbee No, the "but" has nothing to do with it. The "contradiction" I perceive is between the apparent universal efficacy in verse 19 ("all things") and the apparent limitation of that efficacy in verse 23 ("if you continue in faith..."). In other words: Are all things reconciled to Christ - including those who do not continue in their faith - or not?