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Jan
27
comment Is Jesus the Good Samaritan?
@Schuh An allegory is a type of analogy. So if someone were to demonstrate that the parable were an allegory that would answer my question. But there are other types of analogy besides full blown allegory. For instance, The Lion King is not an allegory, but it seems pretty provable that Simba intentionally corresponds to the character of Hamlet in the eponymous play.
Jan
27
comment Is Jesus the Good Samaritan?
@Schuh I might not be clear in my question. Of course people can willy-nilly create whatever analogical correspondences they would like. I'm asking whether Luke intends the parable to be understood at a level beyond the merely ethical in relation to the characters of his broader narrative and if so, whether one of the characters in the parable is particularly supposed to draw comparison to Jesus.
Jan
27
comment Septuagintal Greek in the Lukan Infancy Narratives
@Susan Looking at one quote I had in mind, the author admits a "rough analogy" would be "suddenly launching into a 'King James' style of English." Good find on that study!
Aug
19
comment Does “the church” in Matthew 18:17 refer to the whole assembly?
Also I avoided mentioning elders, because I didn't want to import an ecclesiology that might be anachronistic to the passage anyway.
Aug
19
comment Does “the church” in Matthew 18:17 refer to the whole assembly?
I don't think the move from exegesis to application is that straightforward in this case. A full theology/ethic of church discipline would need to take into account relevant passages from Acts, Paul, the letters of John, etc... But, yes that question is the basis for wanting to ask the question I have here.
Jul
17
comment Is there an allusion to Genesis 3:7 in Luke 24:31?
@Susan The other NT usages are in John 9, Mark 8, and Matthew 9, 20 - all referring to Jesus healing physical blindness (though with obvious symbolism, especially in John 9). And then there are three in Acts: an odd reference in 9:8 to Saul being blind ("although his eyes were opened, he saw nothing"), in 9:40 when Peter raises Tabitha, and then probably the only other directly metaphorical reference in the NT in 26:18 where Paul describes his commission to the Gentiles - that he might "open their eyes, so they may turn from darkness to light."
Jul
13
comment Paul rebukes Peter in Galatians: short and sweet or speech?
Just as a way of note: Paul continues to use "we" and "us" in chapter 3 perhaps in seeming distinction between the Jews and the Galatians - see especially the transition between "we" in 3:23-25 and "you" in 26-29.
Jun
15
comment What were the “tokens of virginity”?
Tigay (JPS Torah Commentary) and Merrill (NAC) both agree. Wenham gives a different interpretation (Wenham, “Bet̆ûlāh—A Girl of Marriageable Age,” Vetus Testamentum 22 (1972): 331–32).
Jun
14
comment How old was Samuel when Hannah took him to the temple?
Welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics. This is a good observation, but you may be interested in this question about the number of children that Hannah had.
Jun
14
comment How many children did Hannah have?
Inspired by this answer.
Jun
13
comment What is the difference in the Kingdom of Heaven and the Kingdom of God?
Jonathan Pennington has a monograph on the topic. He argues against the widely accepted idea that it is merely a circumlocution. Here is a condensed summary he wrote as well.
Jun
13
comment What does “The psalms of David are ended” refer to?
@Susan Sure! Here is one link I found: 11QPs-a
Jun
13
comment What does “The psalms of David are ended” refer to?
@Susan The inscription on the DSS version of Psalm 151 seems to be shorter. Something like: "Hallelujah! A psalm of David, son of Jesse." Or: "A Hallelujah of David, Son of Jesse."
Jun
5
comment What kind of event is being depicted in 1 Thessalonians 4:17?
Welcome to Biblical Hermeneutics. If you have a moment, check out some of our site distinctives. Our site is a Q&A site focused on the interpretation of the Bible. I've edited your question to try to keep it from being closed as off-topic. If the way I've framed it doesn't fit what you're asking, feel free to revert my changes.
Jun
2
comment Who is Matthew's intended audience for the Sermon on the Mount?
While similar in title to this question, I believe this question concerns the audience external to the narrative, whereas the other question concerns the audience internal to it.
Apr
3
comment What is a “hermeneutics of the letter”?
@Davïd Sure thing. I'm not sure the gloss he gives totally captures his methods; but hopefully it helps. Have you ever read "A Son to Me" or his essay on the typological structure of Matthew? They seem to typify the method he expounds in the book.
Mar
24
comment Did Mark intend to end his gospel at 16:8?
@MatthewMiller For my own part, while I'm pretty convinced that the "long ending" is a later addition to the text, I have no strong convictions as to whether the gospel was intended to end at 16:8 or if there was another lost ending along the lines of what we find in Matthew (so James Edwards in the Pillar series).
Mar
24
comment Did Mark intend to end his gospel at 16:8?
@MatthewMiller Thanks for adding your answer. I do think Mark uses key words at points to link ideas (e.g. the "torn" heavens and the "torn" curtain), so I don't dismiss offhand a possible connection between the "young man" who flees and the one at the tomb (which Joel Marcus considers and rejects). That said, even if these connections are real, I'm not convinced they necessitate the conclusion that 16:8 ends the gospel, and preclude the possibility of a re-union in Galilee. I'm particularly leery of projecting modern techniques like an "open ending" back onto ancient literature.
Mar
10
comment John: A lack of “wisdom” in Wisdom literature?
About the intention concerning the word Sophia
Mar
3
comment Why did Jesus enter Jerusalem on a donkey?
It's interesting when Jehu is anointed king, people spread their cloaks out before him; but he seems to be on foot as best I can tell.