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revised Does Isaiah 11:3 involve smelling?
Provide modern Jewish citation; discuss incidental play on words
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comment Does Isaiah 11:3 involve smelling?
@Jas3.1 I did not state the Hebrew word because the word forms part of the question. For clarity, I have now included this in my answer, along with its ordinary meaning.
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revised Does Isaiah 11:3 involve smelling?
restate the Hebrew word from the Question, along with its meaning.
1d
comment Does Isaiah 11:3 involve smelling?
@Jas3.1 My last sentence was, " Isaiah 11:3 does not involve smelling." I arrived at that conclusion by an exegesis of three chapters of Isaiah. I pointed out that if Isaiah was talking about a Messiah, 'smelling was a possible if unlikely meaning, but that if he was prophesying a future king there is no justification for that interpretation. Then I showed that he was prophesying a future king.
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answered Does Isaiah 11:3 involve smelling?
Dec
25
revised How are the 3 types of OT quotes in the NT distributed?
clarification
Dec
24
reviewed Reject Why does Jesus tell the disciples to buy swords?
Dec
24
answered How are the 3 types of OT quotes in the NT distributed?
Dec
22
awarded  Explainer
Dec
21
revised To whom does the Psalmist refer to in Psalm 2:6 as “the installed King of Zion”?
erratum
Dec
21
revised To whom does the Psalmist refer to in Psalm 2:6 as “the installed King of Zion”?
title grammar
Dec
21
answered To whom does the Psalmist refer to in Psalm 2:6 as “the installed King of Zion”?
Dec
20
comment Could Deut. 30:11-14 be a forward-looking prophecy?
@Jas3.1 As for imperative statements being 'future-oriented' - this is always the case, as we are instructing/giving permission/requesting or prohibiting some future act or even thought. The Deuteronomist/Moses is commanding that they (in future) heed what is written in this book of law (Deut 30:10).
Dec
20
comment Could Deut. 30:11-14 be a forward-looking prophecy?
@Jas3.1 I did not mention an 'imperative tense', and when I said "imperative statement," I was not actually discussing grammar. I feel awkward saying this, as I am sure it is something you already know very well, but in general, an imperative statement is written in the imperative mood. Things are more complex in biblical Hebrew because the grammar is a lot more complex than in English grammar, and there are several ways of combining mood and tense at the same time. Unfortunately to go into these options is beyond my ability.
Dec
19
comment Could Deut. 30:11-14 be a forward-looking prophecy?
@Jas3.1 Done. As you have made Paul's use more secondary, I also made it more secondary in my answer. I previously read the question as regarding Romans as the key to Deut 30:11-14 being a prophecy.
Dec
19
revised Could Deut. 30:11-14 be a forward-looking prophecy?
response to changes in the original question and suggestions from the question author.
Dec
19
comment Could Deut. 30:11-14 be a forward-looking prophecy?
@Jas3.1 The tense of Deut 30:11-14 is open to debate but is usually taken as the narrative present, with some debating that it could or should be read as future oriented. However, it is drawing a long straw to say that anything written in the future tense IS a prophecy, or that a reasonable person would expect it to be a prophecy. Imperative statements are about the future whether given in the present or future tense, so to this extent the passage is future oriented (regardless of tense) but we need a sign of prophetic intent for it to be a prophecy.
Dec
19
comment Could Deut. 30:11-14 be a forward-looking prophecy?
@Jas3.1 I think that making Paul's use secondary is useful here if this is recognition that his usage does not determine the intentions of someone else writing centuries beforehand, especially as "Paul made much use of the Old Testament scriptures, but sometimes did so out of context or by implying a different meaning than the original text conveys," a comment I made as an admirer of Paul.
Dec
18
comment Could Deut. 30:11-14 be a forward-looking prophecy?
@Jas3.1 No problem. But in your question, you seem to have been relying on Paul to justify Deuteronomy 30:11-14 as a prophecy. I dealt with Paul's citation, so that Deuteronomy has to be read on its own merits alone. The original text of Deuteronomy seems to be in the present tense, but even changing this to the future tense does not make it a prophecy. Perhaps, I am not assertive enough, whenever I say "I believe," but I believe that hermeneutics is a study where assertion leads to downfall.
Dec
18
answered Could Deut. 30:11-14 be a forward-looking prophecy?