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6h
comment What was written on the stone tablets?
Of course, any answer can only be opinion, including that of Rashi. However, 2 stone tablets small enough to be carried can only hold just so much writing. Characters chiselled into stone can not legibly be too small, so I think we must assume only the Decalogue.
6h
comment Are there any bible scholars that interpret first book of torah naturally instead of through monotheism filter?
@JimThio The only real forum if we can call it that, is in the various universities and seminaries in which they teach, often alongside other scholars or theologians who hold very different views. The best scholars publish papers and books. One place where scholarly papers are regularly published online is academia.edu. Here you can search for papers or refine your interest by 'Research Interest' (corr to our 'tags').
2d
answered Are there any bible scholars that interpret first book of torah naturally instead of through monotheism filter?
May
22
comment Is 2 Kings 23:25 intended to be literal, King Josiah even better than King David?
He probably did, even though he was not consciously making a direct comparison. As a committed Yahwist, he approved of the transition from polytheism and even participated in Josiah's reforms, as author of Deuteronomy and the Deuteronomic History, so we can see why he had such high praise for Josiah. But you asked "how are we to take this statement?" which is a different thing. Still, my role is to provide the information, from my answer and these comments, so you can form your own view on how are we to take the statement in 2 Kings 23:25.
May
22
comment Is 2 Kings 23:25 intended to be literal, King Josiah even better than King David?
@Jacob I think your question is already clear, as also I hope my answer is. 2 Kings 23:25 is not to be taken literally, at least in making a comparison between Josiah and David. The intent of the author would exclude us using it to make a comparison with David, because his intent was to praise Josiah as the king who made the religious reforms that he (the Deuteronomist) heartily approved of. No doubt a 7th-century-BCE monotheistic prophet was sincere in saying that no king like him turned to the Lord with all his heart etc., according to all the law of Moses.
May
21
answered Is 2 Kings 23:25 intended to be literal, King Josiah even better than King David?
May
18
comment Was 20 (Numbers 32:11, Deuteronomy 1:39) the age from which God would consider an Israelite accountable for his sins?
Asking what rabbis teach, suggests that this question may belong in Judaism.
May
15
comment Do linguistic features of Ecclesiastes rule out Solomon as the author?
@Susan It was not clear from the question how much detail you needed, in fact I read the last sentence as pointing to a general answer. I looked up the article that David cited and gave some more detail. Restricted by i) my inadequate Hebrew (I did not want to inadvertently get the grammar wrong) and ii) concern for copyright restrictions against large-scale copy-paste. I hope this helps.
May
15
revised Do linguistic features of Ecclesiastes rule out Solomon as the author?
specific examples.
May
14
answered Do linguistic features of Ecclesiastes rule out Solomon as the author?
May
13
answered What is the ‘Wisdom of God’ in Luke 11:49?
May
13
awarded  Fanatic
May
12
comment Does the past tense in the suffering servant song (Isaiah 53) refer to Jesus?
@servantofWiser Please be aware that Isaiah ch 56-66 were not actually written by Isaiah, son of Amoz, but by an anon. author after return from Babylonian Exile and then subsequently added to Isaiah's book. Look at the wording of 61:1-3 from viewpoint of a recently freed people to whom this author was writing.
May
7
comment Would it have mattered if God cursed Adam and Eve if they had eaten from the tree of life?
@JoshuaBigbee The Q seems to allow in its "parallel universe" for the Tree of Life to be forbidden, for Adam to eat of it and then for God to curse him for doing so. Nevertheless, I acknowledge that you hold different views about the story of the Garden of Eden than do people such as Kass. When you speculatively say, "thought it a far more likely scenario ..." this should be in another answer, not a comment to this one.
May
6
reviewed Close Is the book of Daniel critiquing Humanism?
May
6
comment 1 Tim 2:12: What about a woman prophesying with authority over a man?
@C.StirlingBartholomew Thank you for your information, which I have incorporated in my answer. You will have noted that I originally left open whether or not this is an interpolation, and I still do so. I agree that we need more evidence before asserting this to be the most likely explanation.
May
5
revised 1 Tim 2:12: What about a woman prophesying with authority over a man?
Additional citation
May
5
reviewed Leave Open Would it have mattered if God cursed Adam and Eve if they had eaten from the tree of life?
May
5
answered 1 Tim 2:12: What about a woman prophesying with authority over a man?
May
4
revised Would it have mattered if God cursed Adam and Eve if they had eaten from the tree of life?
Consider possible interpretation of the question