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Sep
30
answered Connotation of πλεονεξία in Colossians 3:5
Sep
30
revised Connotation of πλεονεξία in Colossians 3:5
edited tags
Sep
29
comment Satan: Stumbling Block or Accuser?
I'm curious where the snake in Genesis fits into this.
Sep
29
asked What are the proverbs about giving collateral for someone else teaching about loans?
Sep
29
reviewed Reviewed What is meant by “Death and Hades were thrown into the lake of fire”?
Sep
29
reviewed Reviewed Does the phrase “born of water and the Spirit” refer to one, or two births?
Sep
29
asked Does Romans 13:8 include a prohibition of taking loans?
Sep
27
comment Ecclesiastes 4:12 A cord of three strands is not quickly broken
@J.C.Salomon Thank you. :) I am hesitant about qualifying phrases, because if I continually relativize my beliefs, I destroy them (since they defy relativism). But I have added something of a qualifying phrase to properly note in the answer itself that Jewish scolarship would differ on this point. And we can leave these comments in place as well.
Sep
27
revised Ecclesiastes 4:12 A cord of three strands is not quickly broken
Added qualifying phrase
Sep
27
comment Ecclesiastes 4:12 A cord of three strands is not quickly broken
@J.C.Salomon As someone who holds firmly to a Triune God, when I read a passage inspired by that God that asserts the superiority of three, I would be remiss to neglect the reference... these frictions are inevitable at an ecumenical hermeneutics site. I reject the idea that Christians and Jews have some deeper level of agreement which allows for neutral discussions. Occassionally we will say say similar things, but fundamentally we will always mean very different things. For me to separate Christology or Trinitarianism from my Old Testament exegesis to give up my faith.
Sep
24
comment Did Job believe in an afterlife where wrongs could be righted?
Jon, I trust that you will forgive me for posting several rebuttals of your posts in the last few days! I do want to admit that I find your argument from the overall point of the text (not questioning God even when he seems questionable) very strong. So +1 for that and a helpful introduction to the textual issues. (For the record, though, I am no fan of Wright!)
Sep
24
answered Did Job believe in an afterlife where wrongs could be righted?
Sep
24
comment Does “foundations of the earth” in Job 38:4 refer to just the earth, or is it a metaphor for more?
Yes. Dealing with matter in the abstract is very Greek. The Scriptures have a radically approach to ontology than the philosophers; I would be tempted to answer this question with a simple N/A! Moreover, music as we know is only possible via sound waves, so whatever this singing is it is not music as we know it anyway. Which is more primordial is not even a question within the realm of possibility in Bible. Rather God is the Creator and has preëminence over man, and in this case specifically, Job. +1
Sep
24
comment Does “foundations of the earth” in Job 38:4 refer to just the earth, or is it a metaphor for more?
@Caleb Yes, I think there are two questions here.
Sep
24
revised Does “foundations of the earth” in Job 38:4 refer to just the earth, or is it a metaphor for more?
Added tags; fixed spelling/capitalization
Sep
23
comment Were the Nephilim in Genesis 6 aliens?
@JonEricson נֶפֶל means a premature birth, or a miscarried or aborted baby; literally/etymologically (I think), "that which has fallen [from the womb]" (Job 3:15; Psalm 58:8; Ecclesiastes 6:3).
Sep
23
comment Was 'σκύβαλον' (skubalon) profanity?
@Mike Okay, thanks. Have a look (don't be freaked out by the way the diffing engine makes everything go red and green...some of that is just removal of bolding). Once again, if you don't like it, feel free to change it or roll it back. I can be a brutal editor when unleashed. This edit doesn't have so much to do with my analysis of the Greek (though I did look into that a little) but simply with the mode of presentation of your argument. I hope I have well preserved your intention and perhaps shored up the presentation a little. :)
Sep
23
revised Was 'σκύβαλον' (skubalon) profanity?
Attempting to strengthen the presentation of the argument
Sep
23
comment How did mankind's way of relating to God change in Genesis 4:26?
You bring up some interesting points here, but I disagree with your conclusion. I've added a section to my answer to rebut your position. See what you think.
Sep
23
revised How did mankind's way of relating to God change in Genesis 4:26?
Added "Naming God?" section