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Jan
8
comment Coherence-Based Genealogical Method vs. Local Text-Types Theory
Thanks for doing the conversion :-)
Jan
7
comment Coherence-Based Genealogical Method vs. Local Text-Types Theory
This is a good intro by Gerd Mink, and if you have the time nothing quite beats working through the presentation here. For any complicated questions, you need to refer to: Mink, G. (2004). "Problems of a highly contaminated tradition: the New Testament – Stemmata of variants as a source of a genealogy for witnesses," in Studies in Stemmatology II, ed. P. van Reenen et al. Amsterdam/Philadelphia: Jo
Nov
12
comment In what way was Jesus' prayer heard (Hebrews 5:7)?
I'd still argue that Jesus' prayer was fully heard - because he wasn't praying that he be saved from death. The extra "Yet not what I will, but what you will." shows that his prayer (in Matt 26 and Mark 14) was ultimately an act of aligning himself and his feelings with God's will - even if he started off wanting to be saved from death. In this way it's a great model for prayer for us, we start praying for one thing but by the end we find ourselves praying for something else through having spent time in God's presence.
Nov
6
comment Chronology of Jesus' ministry: John and the Synoptics
Also... just a thought since you've sparked my interest :) John must have known at least some shared traditions (Mark, proto-Mark...?) with the Synoptics, for example: he seems to assume that his readers will know about John the Baptist's fate while he never describes it (c.f. John 3:24).
Nov
6
comment Chronology of Jesus' ministry: John and the Synoptics
Considering Passovers is interesting here - the Synoptics have one, while John has more (three, four?). The chronology in the Synoptics seems a little simplified with just Galilee then Jerusalem. But I like your point "no New Testament text was as uptight about chronology as we are today." Quite right :)
Nov
6
comment How should John 1 be interpreted?
John's prologue has parallels with Genesis 1 - New Creation vs. Creation. Both start "In the beginning God..." and since Jews referred to books by their starting words this would have been starkly obvious to John's readers/hearers. The prologue seems a bit like an opening sequence to a film, setting up lots of the ideas (light/darkness, God becoming flesh etc.) that then are important later in the narrative. It's a way for the author to provide information to the reader that the characters in the story don't know yet - c.f. the recurring theme of people speculating who Jesus is.
Nov
6
comment In what way was Jesus' prayer heard (Hebrews 5:7)?
John 11:25 (apart from being a wonderful verse in its own right) shows that Jesus is thinking about his own upcoming death at this point - and so links it in his thinking with Lazarus' death and restoration to life. So I agree :) Thinking about Gethsemane, it seems to me that because Jesus knows that his prayers are always heard, it is therefore a great example of submission not to just pray "Father let this cup pass from me" - but instead to add "yet not my will but yours".
Nov
6
comment Where was the dinner in John 12?
:) Thanks. Only just found out about this site.
Nov
5
comment In what way was Jesus' prayer heard (Hebrews 5:7)?
John 11:41-42 is interesting in this respect, where Jesus thanks the Father for hearing his prayer (presumably when there was no smell coming from Lazarus' tomb). It seems pretty submissive to wait around for a few days while he knows Lazarus is dying, again presumably because he knows that it is the Father's will that he should do so.