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comment How do we interpret Luke 17:37?
@majnemɪzdæn Are you a riddle wrapped in an enigma.....;>) ? I was less than satisfied with the Matt. 24 answer, and I originally didn't see the Luke 17 answer on CSE. I like Joseph's answer, which if no other answers turn in will receive my check.
1d
comment How do we interpret Luke 17:37?
Thank you for your response! This was not an answer given in the previous discussion of this question; I basically agree with your conclusion-there is no other way of interpreting 'eagle' except as a bird of prey, consequently, those 'taken' by the eagles are where eagles go to devour their flesh-certainly no picture of anything that looks like heaven. Those 'left behind' therefore, are those who will be 'caught up' with the Lord; not as a 'dead carcase' but as a living body.
2d
comment What is the traditional understanding of God's Marriage Contract(Ketubah) with Israel?
Thank you for your response! I'm sure there was much more you could add, but I believe it captures the essence of the Ketubah, between Israel and God. What particularly captures my interest is the view that each of the books of the Torah represent one of the witnesses of the Ketubah.
Oct
20
comment How do we interpret Luke 17:37?
@Charlie I appreciate your research in finding a similar question; I searched it, but originally didn't see the Luke text, although the Matthew records almost the same discussion. However, I am dissatisfied with the answers given, as they are either "off the wall", or "I don't know-but I think this...". I will answer it myself, if no one else has a satisfactory answer, but I would like to keep it open, just in case.
Oct
19
asked How do we interpret Luke 17:37?
Oct
15
comment What are the arguments used by literal interpreters of Ezekiel's temple (Ezek. 40-48)?
"Therefore, if reading Scripture literally, the evidence points to Ezekiel's temple being on earth during that thousand year period". Yes, and I don't know how you can read that passage and form any other conclusion-though there certainly are. I would like to see other answers, as I'm sure there are; however, as it stands I believe this is the best answer(short of a book) which could be written on this question.
Oct
15
accepted What are the arguments used by literal interpreters of Ezekiel's temple (Ezek. 40-48)?
Oct
15
comment What are the arguments used by literal interpreters of Ezekiel's temple (Ezek. 40-48)?
@ScottS I'm afraid my original question may have 'strayed' into the 'systematic theology' rubric, although that was not my intention. I'm glad you caught my 'flag' and sculpted it to fit what I'm sure will be an excellent response.
Oct
14
asked What are the arguments used by literal interpreters of Ezekiel's temple (Ezek. 40-48)?
Oct
10
comment How do we understand the verse “I saw the souls of those who had been slain.”
@Bagpipes The altar is the place of consecration; the souls are not 'all bunched up', what we are seeing are those who's consecration is the ultimate sacrifice. Remember, they are "alive" and in Paradise with Christ(think of the of the thief on the cross), yet since their "flesh" is decaying in the dust of the earth, and they haven't been joined to their resurrected body yet, they are 'asleep', in that they have no physical 'house' by which their soul can express itself.
Oct
9
comment What is the distinction between symbolic and apocalyptic interpretations of Ezekiel's temple vision?
Well, now I'm tantalized; is there a way to word a question which would allow you to share your Millenial View(concerning Ezekiel's Temple)?
Oct
8
comment What is the distinction between symbolic and apocalyptic interpretations of Ezekiel's temple vision?
I assume what you've written is an excerpt from your presentation which very incisively deals with the symbolic and apocalyptic interpretations; I was left hanging as far as your post millennial view-you may have exhausted character count debunking the 1st three, but I would have enjoyed your answer more. Nevertheless +1
Oct
8
answered How do we understand the verse “I saw the souls of those who had been slain.”
Oct
1
comment What did Jesus likely say in John 8:58?
@Susan I have to agree w/ScottS, although you don't know if there is a semantic difference until you pose the question. The context is the main clue here-whatever Jesus did say was enough to make them boil with rage. And asserting His Divinity would have done exactly that.
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
29
comment What do bible authors mean by “they remain there till this day…”?
@MarkEdward Are there variants in the sources? Can they be traced?
Sep
29
comment What was the 'testimony' that Aaron's rod was brought before?
@Bye Yes, I am in complete agreement and I see this as a satisfactory answer. Note There are some here that don't, given the fact you used Strong's(a concordance), vs BDAG, BDB, or some other "Lexicon" which purports to give an actual "translation" of the word, rather than it's KJV equivalent, which is perceived as having 'barely a leg to stand on'. I find no essential difference between Strong's and other lexicons in this instance; but others on this site take significant exception.;>)
Sep
29
comment Why is the observation that “it was good” missing on the second day?
Yes, I was just about to state the same thing when you beat me to it.... I found Keil & Delitzsch's Commentary said,"division of the waters was not complete till the separation of the dry land from the water had taken place, and therefore the proper place for the expression of approval is at the close of the work of the third day." Since the author is not writing to angels, but rather to men, the completion of the separation of the waters doesn't occur until the 3rd day.(+1)
Sep
26
comment What does Jesus mean by “Pray then like this:” before the “Lord's Prayer”
Good answers, both your's and Jack's. The heart condition of prayer is the main concern, but Jesus also offers them a 'template'(in this manner) to assist them.
Sep
26
comment Does kôkābîm (כוֹכָבִים) in Book of Daniel refer to any bright objects in the sky?
@kenorb The same word is used in Dan. 12:3 with the same context; which is figuratively describing "bright ones"(stars), meaning angelic hosts. In 12:3 it is "resurrected people" who retain this quality of "kokabim".