Reputation
2,932
Top tag
Next privilege 3,500 Rep.
Protect questions
Badges
6 31
Newest
 Organizer
Impact
~122k people reached

Jul
12
comment Did Adam and Eve not have sex in the Garden of Eden?
Welcome to BHSE! We're a little different here, if you review our Site Directives, it will assist you in asking and answering questions. Thank you!
Jul
12
revised In light of this scripture how does this fit in with a dispensational hermeneutic if this is the first resurrection?
added 10 characters in body
Jul
12
revised In light of this scripture how does this fit in with a dispensational hermeneutic if this is the first resurrection?
added 588 characters in body
Jul
12
answered In light of this scripture how does this fit in with a dispensational hermeneutic if this is the first resurrection?
Jul
9
comment Shall I Know Pleasure?(Gen. 18:12)
Thank you for your insightful answer! I suspected as much, but have no understanding of Hebrew language constructs. Thank you for pointing out "she laughing" with "Isaac"(he laughing).
Jul
8
comment Understanding of Matthew 25:31
I don't think we truly know what "glory" is until we see it manifested in the realm of the Spirit. Nathanael saw "Heaven open and the angels ascending and descending on the Son of Man(John 1:51)". How many have even had a glimpse of that? I think "glory" is much used, but least understood word-Thank you for bringing it to mind!
Jul
8
revised Shall I Know Pleasure?(Gen. 18:12)
added 33 characters in body
Jul
8
asked Shall I Know Pleasure?(Gen. 18:12)
Jul
7
comment Understanding of Matthew 25:31
I believe Susan has rendered an accurate account of the differences in glory being translational, peculiar to the NIV. We obviously will not know the extent of the Heavenly glory, nor the Son of Man's glory until we see it for ourselves. The translators are presuming a difference which they have no way of knowing. The fact that they changed it in the 2011 is confirmation of this. Which is why I don't care for the NIV.........;>)
Jul
7
revised Who is the “we” that plays the flute and sings the dirge in Luke 7:32?
edited body
Jul
7
answered Who is the “we” that plays the flute and sings the dirge in Luke 7:32?
Jul
7
comment What can we infer from the different nativity accounts in Matthew and Luke?
I certainly encourage you to stay, but our Site Directives state that we are not a "Christian" site, therefore we allow other POV's as long as they "take the text seriously". I didn't believe the answer in question did, but we must maintain civility at all times, respecting the rights of others to express their views, and give the benefit of the doubt to those who disagree. On this site, the strength of our evidence outweighs the strength of our convictions.
Jul
6
comment What can we infer from the different nativity accounts in Matthew and Luke?
I voted +1 to encourage you, you appear to have some skills which may prove beneficial to this site. However, your tone and demeanor need to change before this becomes the kind of answer we're looking for. If you remove the prescriptive(ie:'preachy') statements and just "state the facts", supporting your conclusions, your contributions will find a greater degree of acceptance. Thank you!
Jul
6
comment What can we infer from the different nativity accounts in Matthew and Luke?
Welcome to BHSE! We're a little different here, if you visit our Site Directives it will assist you in asking and answering questions. Thank you!
Jul
6
comment What can we infer from the different nativity accounts in Matthew and Luke?
Thank you for taking the time for refuting the previous claim. I normally don't DV them(if they offer clear convincing evidence for their argument) but I saw it as a blatant attempt to impose "Modern Critical scholarship" without concern for the text itself. Thank you!
Jul
6
revised What can we infer from the different nativity accounts in Matthew and Luke?
spelling,grammar
Jul
6
comment What can we infer from the different nativity accounts in Matthew and Luke?
@DickHarfield itself, yet reconciling them with the details of the fulfillment of numerous prophecies which were fulfilled. Modernists, who've devalued any prophecy are attempting to 're-create' historical events based on their 'critical sources', error in judging 'anomalies' as reasons to discredit traditional sources, and instead impose their 'agnostic', post-modern worldview-discrediting the Scriptures themselves, reducing them to a collection of 'moral sayings', and taking away the very source of their impact, which is Divine inspiration,
Jul
6
comment What can we infer from the different nativity accounts in Matthew and Luke?
@DickHarfield Textual criticism aside. this is where I part company with Modern Critical scholarship. In an attempt to 're-create' an account from 'unbiased' historical sources, they totally ignore the fact that those sources themselves are biased; being slanted from a pagan, agnostic, or antagonistic view. The writers of Matthew and Luke have different sources, but paint the same picture, albeit with some anomalies given from the points of perspective of those giving the accounts. The Early Church fathers reconciled these anomalies by different accounts; giving credence to the account(con.'t)
Jul
3
comment Who is the Prince of Tyre?
@MarkEdward,@ScottS I attempted to more clearly lay out a pattern of understanding; we could also see "the Woman's seed, vs the Serpent's seed" if you want to satisfy the concern of "anachronism".
Jul
3
revised Who is the Prince of Tyre?
added 2159 characters in body