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The last letter of the Hebrew alphabet is called Tau, and it has the power of the Roman T. In its present form n, in the square character now in use, it has no resemblance to a cross; but in the ancient Hebrew alphabet, its figure X, or +, was that of a cross. Hence, when it is said, in the vision of Ezekiel (ix, 4) "Go through the midst of the city, and set a mark (in the original"n, tau) upon the foreheads of the men that sigh and that cry for all the abominations that be done in the midst thereof"- which mark was to distinguish them as persons to be saved, on account of their sorrow for sin, from those who, as idolaters, were to be slain-the evident allusion is to a cross. The form of this cross was X or +, a form familiar to the people of that day.

It is significant to me in that it not only corresponds to the 1st letter of my name, but it corresponds to the One Who Saves us(The Aleph and the Tav) and His Work in redemption; which became real for me in Mar. 29, 1976 and has been real since.


Jan
15
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
12
comment Are the unlearned and unstable in 2 Pet 3:16 regenerated Christians?
@brilliant The 2 Pet. 3:14-18 section could almost be viewed as another paragraph, although it ties in with the previous one. His admonishment in vs 17 is "...not to fall from your own steadfastness" is clearly to those who are 'regenerate', hence the context of vs 16 would be the same.
Jan
12
comment How old was Isaac when he was offered up by Abraham?
@Susan I read the same sources, and came to the same conclusion that Isaac was not a 'young lad' who could be 'overpowered' by Abraham, but a 'young man'(37 is young, if your father is 137). Either way, Isaac was 'willingly bound', in that he trusted his father who said, "G-d will provide a sacrifice", whether or not the sacrifice was himself, or some other. Interestingly, in Mandarin character, part of 'sacrifice' includes 'lamb'.
Jan
12
comment Are the unlearned and unstable in 2 Pet 3:16 regenerated Christians?
@brilliant This issue of regeneration of course is a theological one, which depends on what theological tradition you hold(Calvinist, Arminian, Orthodox, etc., will give you a variety of answers. I used Tit. 2:5, which in ref. to John 3:5(water and the Spirit) describes regeneration. The point being: one can be unlearned and unstable, and still be regenerated. I quoted 1 Pet. 2:3, which is a verse for regenerated, not unregenerated. Rom. 12:1-2 says basically the same thing, to believers, not to unregenerated. But your theological tradition will tell you who is or isn't regenerated.
Jan
11
answered Are the unlearned and unstable in 2 Pet 3:16 regenerated Christians?
Jan
9
answered Does John 12:31 refer to the event in Revelation 12:9?
Jan
3
comment What species of eagle is depicted in Deuteronomy 32:11?
@justhalf If you would have 'entered the link' I provided, you would have heard how the male eagle will 'catch' the young eaglets as they learn to fly-just before they hit the ground. This is also part of the mating ritual; the female will drop various sized branches, until she drops a log, which the male eagle will catch before it hits bottom. 1 miss and it's over(for the male). This insures the female eagle who 'nudges' the young eaglets out of the nest will be caught by the male, who is 'soaring' around, waiting for the young eaglets 1st attempt at flight.
Jan
1
comment Accurate translation of הִתְעֵתֶים in Jeremiah 42:20
@BruceJames Well stated!
Dec
30
revised “Adultery in your heart” verse
added 112 characters in body
Dec
30
answered “Adultery in your heart” verse
Dec
28
comment The Euphrates River Drying up?
@Jas3.1 This is the problem with answering a question based on a false presupposition. Yes, while we may still find evidence of marigolds growing on the moon, how far do you 'entertain' the idea before putting it to rest?
Dec
28
comment The Euphrates River Drying up?
@Jas3.1 I don't take it personal ;>)
Dec
27
comment The Euphrates River Drying up?
@Jas3.1 The Preterists can't explain it, other than to say there must have been some historical record of the Euphrates drying up, and a subsequent attack by the Parthians during the 1st century. But since there is no historical record to show this, they are hard pressed to find this verse(and numerous other verses like it) being fulfilled in the 1st century. Of course, mention the words "this generation" and they get rapturous, expounding on the various types and shadows fulfilled by 70AD. They just don't have a 'good' answer for this verse, so they tend to ignore it.
Dec
24
comment Did Jesus read minds or perceive them?
I don't think this question could be answered any better-thank you for your response!
Dec
23
comment Did Jesus read minds or perceive them?
The "pure in heart" see both God and man. To have a 'single eye' means no deception clouds your own judgment, therefore, it is easier to see others.
Dec
23
comment Luke 22:38 - ἱκανόν ἐστιν - Does it mean, “It is enough” or “Enough!”
Excellent answer! Since there is no clear indication of the imperative, and one could rightly take to mean '2 swords is sufficient', even though contextually Jesus is not talking about swordplay, the best we can say is Jesus was following the plan of God in spite of His disciples' misunderstandings.
Dec
23
comment Did Jesus subject Himself to the law of the land by paying the temple tax?
@BenchNoviaBensing This is a good question; on the 'surface' it appears He's condescending, but when you 'dig' beneath the surface, you find His response is absolutely proper, as Jesus was 'under the Law' and guiltless according to it.
Dec
22
comment Luke 22:38 - ἱκανόν ἐστιν - Does it mean, “It is enough” or “Enough!”
@user6509 A good question! The only significant difference from the Peshitta is "sufficient", which is not "enough" of a case to go on. The fact that He miraculously healed the servant's ear points to the fact that swordplay was not His intent, yet He doesn't verbally dissuade them from getting swords. The "Hikanon estin" doesn't seem strong enough(without being there) to indicate His displeasure, although clearly He never intended to resist arrest.
Dec
21
comment “he will rule over you” — good, bad, or neutral?
@Jas3.1 I couldn't include this in my answer, as it would appear 'anachronistic', but in 1 Cor. 15:25-26,"He must reign, till He has put all enemies under His feet. The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death." Because of sin, death entered and it requires "dominion" to overcome. You might say it wasn't God's 'perfect' plan, but necessary to live in a world that is under the dominion of darkness.
Dec
19
answered “he will rule over you” — good, bad, or neutral?