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Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
@MatthewMiller: Jesus was not "looking for a bride"; he was seeking and saving the lost. Jesus began that work in Samaria by introducing himself to one lone Samaritan whose witness in Samaria started a chain reaction of faith in Jesus the Messiah. To get sidelined into an interpretation of the text which is about as far from John's purpose in writing his Gospel as is possible to go is to pursue a tangent which diverges from the truth. John wrote his Gospel "so that [his readers] may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing [they] may have life in His name" (20:31).
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
@MatthewMiller: The allegorical approach has been around for millennia. Midrashic hermeneutics had its Sod (sood or sawd) approach to Scripture, which looked for hidden, secret, and mystical meanings in ways which would make the biblical writers scratch their heads incredulously and say, "But I didn't mean that!" When Jesus explained (i.e., "hermeneuticked") to Cleopas & the other disciple on Emmaus Road "the things concerning himself in all the Scriptures," do you REALLY think he interpreted those "things" allegorically? Email me (see my profile) & I'll send you Jesus' sermon outline! Don
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
@MatthewMiller: Guess we'll need to agree to disagree agreeably. I cannot honestly see any good in coming from your approach to Scripture. It seems fanciful, highly subjective, highly symbolic--allegorical, even, and is not supported by a commonsense reading of the text. Granted, there is a depth to the Scripture which none of us will ever plumb, and no single method of interpretation can unlock all its treasures. Nevertheless, a spiritualizing hermeneutic can often--and has!--become a "slippery slope" which leads to an erratic and risible, even, approach to interpreting the Bible.
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
For an interesting and informative verse-by-verse exposition of John 4, check out this site: christiancourier.com/articles/282-jesus-and-the-samaritan-woman. Don
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
@MatthewMiller: Your hermeneutic is certainly, uh, unique! Mine is informed by a middle-of-the-road, mostly conservative Evangelicalism. Accordingly, I look at Jesus' interaction with the woman at the well as the consequence of his being led by the Spirit to this particular woman at this particular time, so that the good news of the kingdom could take root not only in her heart but also in her fellow townspeople. Very possibly, the success of Philip the evangelist among the Samaritans years later was attributable to the seeds Jesus had sowed in the 2 days he spent in Sychar (see Acts 8:5-25).
Mar
2
answered Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
Feb
23
revised What is the context in Mark and Luke as regards the buying and preparing of the spices?
a couple errata
Feb
23
comment Concealing & revealing in Proverbs 25:2
I guess what I'm saying is that a proverb squeezes a great nugget of truth into very few words, but it doesn't squeeze everything! One "app" of searching things out is in matters of justice; another is in matters of everyday ethics; another is in not-so-common commonsense; another is acquiring a spiritual understanding which was heretofore a bit of a mystery; and so on. About God concealing sin; well, that's another app (see Prov 10:12; 17:9; and 1 Pet 4:8), although the second half of the proverb (i.e., 25:2) makes that app a little forced. (It's still true, however!).
Feb
23
comment Concealing & revealing in Proverbs 25:2
@Jas.3.1: One interpretation; many applications. Solomon, for example, searched out the legal, moral, ethical, and spiritual implications of the case of the two harlots who gave birth to two babies, one of whom died (see 1 Kings 3:16 ff.). You'll recall that one harlot did the ol' switcheroo (her dead baby for the living baby) and then had the temerity to tell King Sol the living baby was hers! Sol offered to divide the child in two, and the rest is history. Notice that "all Israel heard of the king's judgment . . . [and] saw the wisdom of God was in him to administer judgment" (v.28).
Feb
22
answered Concealing & revealing in Proverbs 25:2
Feb
20
revised What is “that day” in John 14:20?
minor word change
Feb
19
comment What is “that day” in John 14:20?
@Tau: I've added some "new stuff" which I hope addresses your concerns. Don
Feb
19
revised What is “that day” in John 14:20?
inserted some new stuff
Feb
19
answered What is “that day” in John 14:20?
Feb
19
comment Do the specific gifts the father gives to the prodigal son have any special significance?
@Caleb: Uh, please correct me if I'm wrong, but who was the teller of the parable? Hint: It wasn't Mohammed!
Feb
18
revised What does “suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin” in 1 Peter 4:1 mean?
major reorganization; corrected a few errata; eliminated unnecessary repetition; highlighted Bible verses
Feb
14
answered What is the accurate meaning of κεφαλὴ (kephalē) in 1 Cor 11:3?
Feb
14
comment What is John 15:10 really saying?
Good points. One thing seems to be missing. Jesus' most important commandment--and John his beloved disciple "got this right"--was to "love one another" (John 13:34; 15:12 & 15; 1 John 3:11 & 23; 4:7, 11, & 12). Without this key component, our interpretation of John 15:10 is missing something important. Do you agree? Don
Feb
12
comment How should 2 Thessalonians 2:1-3 be interpreted?
Thomas, one of the original Twelve, was once a higher critic. He wasn't about to fall for the stories being told by a bunch of hysterical women that Jesus had risen from the dead. "Unless I see in His hands the imprint of the nails, and put my finger into the place of the nails, and put my hand into His side, I will not believe," he said emphatically. Eight days later the resurrected Jesus said to him, "Reach here with your finger, and see My hands; reach here your hand and put it into My side; do not be unbelieving, but believing." Thomas then said to Jesus, "My Lord and my God!" Selah.
Feb
12
comment How should 2 Thessalonians 2:1-3 be interpreted?
"When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail." The hammer, of course, is the favored tool of the higher critics, and the nails in need of pounding (e.g., who REALLY wrote 2 Thessalonians) stem from their unbelief, arrogance, and pride. Throw in a little peer pressure and the fear of losing face if they happen to let it slip they're beginning to feel as though they and their peers are simply re-arranging deck chairs on the Titanic, while the people of faith whom they ridicule are living and dying for the Word of God, and what you end up with are a bunch of modern-day Pharisees.