2,803 reputation
217
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location Pittsburgh, PA
age 64
visits member for 1 year, 2 months
seen yesterday

For the last 56 years, I have been a practicing Christian (liberally conservative and evangelical). Should any posting I make to any Stack Exchange website pique your curiosity as to the what and why of my beliefs, feel free to communicate with me at drlarter@yahoo.com. I do not claim to have all the answers--let alone all the questions(!), but I would consider it a privilege to discuss Christianity with you in a rational and civilized fashion.

My wife (a native Egyptian and Christian) and I have been married over 40 years. We have two grown children who have flown the coop, making us empty nesters.

I have a Master's degree in Speech Communications and three years of doctoral studies in Rhetorical Theory at the University of Pittsburgh. After a brief stint as a teacher of public speaking, I embarked on a couple of different and totally divergent pursuits by owning and operating two small businesses.

Tired of being in business for myself, I went back to school at Duquesne University's Paralegal Institute in Pittsburgh, where I was certified recently as a paralegal. I am currently looking for employment in that field, and would like to round out the last stage of my work life in some area of jurisprudence.

A rhetorical perspective is almost as natural to me as breathing. Overt and covert attempts at persuasion, whether written or spoken, are my legitimate targets for analysis, evaluation, and criticism. Of particular interest to the EL&U web site contributors would be, with some adaptations and modifications, the traditional canons of speech: style (elocutio), invention (inventio), organization (dispositio), memorability (memoria), and delivery (pronuntiatio or actio) .


May
15
comment Is Saul's insult intended to be incoherent?
Citing a credible authority or two would have strengthened your argument, especially since the OP asked if Saul's invective included some common Hebrew tropes. Even if the "only" authority you cite is the Bible itself, so much the better, IMO. A good first attempt. Don
May
14
answered Who is the “True Companion” in Philippians 4:3?
May
10
comment What does μονογενὴς Θεὸς means in John 1:18?
@Joseph: As for Jesus, the antitype of Isaac, He too was the "one and only" child of promise, the seed of the woman (Genesis 3:15). In love, the Father allowed the heel of His μονογενής to be bruised at the cross by the seed of the serpent, so that whoever believed in the Son would not perish but have eternal life through Him (John 3:16). In turn, the head of the serpent's seed was crushed at Calvary when Jesus cried "Accomplished!"
May
10
comment What does μονογενὴς Θεὸς means in John 1:18?
@Joseph: From God's perspective, Isaac WAS Abe's firstborn--the firstborn child of the promise God made to Abe when he was 75 years old. God did not treat "firstborn" (according to the "flesh") Ishmael like chopped liver, however, and made some great promises to him and his descendants (Ge 17:20), even though he was not THE child of promise. Interestingly, God underscored the nature of the unilateral promise He made to Abe by putting him into a deep sleep, rather than walking through the sacrificial animals with Abe in "suzerain treaty" fashion. IOW, God's word alone was sufficient!
May
9
revised What does μονογενὴς Θεὸς means in John 1:18?
eliminated an unnecessary "in conclusion"
May
9
answered What does μονογενὴς Θεὸς means in John 1:18?
May
2
comment Is loving your neighbour more than yourself allowed?
@jdj081: Thanks for the encouragement. Thanks, too, for the excellent citation of Ephesians 5:29. Don
May
1
answered Is loving your neighbour more than yourself allowed?
May
1
revised Was the Revelation written in code to hide it from the Romans?
deleted some unnecessarily repeated words
Apr
26
comment Why it is translated “Be filled by the Spirit” (Eph 5:18-20)
I've heard more than one preacher suggest the imperative in Eph 5:18 could be translated legitimately as "Be ye, being filled with the Holy Spirit, [be] speaking . . making music . . . giving thanks . . . submitting . . .." That translation stresses the ongoing need to be filled again and again. Whose work is it? It is not a matter of "EITHER God OR us," but "BOTH God AND us." God does His part; we do our part. He empowers; we yield. Compare Philippians 2:12-13: "Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling. For God is at work in you both to will and to do of His good pleasure."
Apr
22
comment What is the context of Luke 12:47-48?
@user2479: You're welcome, I'm sure. Thank you for your encouragement. Don
Apr
22
revised What is the context of Luke 12:47-48?
a misspelling was corrected
Apr
22
comment What is the context of Luke 12:47-48?
@user2479: I was glad to. See the "addendum" in my answer. I hope it helps. If not, feel free to ask further questions. Don
Apr
22
revised What is the context of Luke 12:47-48?
provided an addendum by popular demand!
Apr
21
comment Are sins of the future forgiven? John 20:23
@ScottS: It was SURELY an error! (I imagine, however, that more than a few people wish they were free to sin with impunity. The pleasures of sin, however, are for a very short season, but at God's right hand are pleasures forever more. See Psalm 16:11 KJV, and Hebrews 11:25.)
Apr
21
revised Are sins of the future forgiven? John 20:23
added a last paragraph
Apr
21
answered What is the context of Luke 12:47-48?
Apr
21
comment Are sins of the future forgiven? John 20:23
@user2479: See my comment to ScottS. Thanks for your correction and for your encouragement. Don
Apr
21
comment Are sins of the future forgiven? John 20:23
@ScottS: Wow! What a blunder! Rest assured I'm not an antinomianist. Thanks for the correction. Don
Apr
21
revised Are sins of the future forgiven? John 20:23
inserted a crucial, negative word