3,359 reputation
218
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location Pittsburgh, PA
age 64
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen Mar 26 at 0:59

For the last 57 years, I have been a practicing Christian (liberally conservative and evangelical). Should any posting I make to any Stack Exchange website pique your curiosity as to the what and why of my beliefs, feel free to communicate with me at drlarter@yahoo.com. I do not claim to have all the answers--let alone all the questions(!), but I would consider it a privilege to discuss Christianity with you in a rational and civilized fashion.

My wife (a native Egyptian and Christian) and I have been married over 41 years. We have two grown children who have flown the coop, making us empty nesters.

I have a Master's degree in Speech Communications and three years of doctoral studies in Rhetorical Theory at the University of Pittsburgh. After a brief stint as a teacher of public speaking, I embarked on a couple of different and totally divergent pursuits by owning and operating two small businesses.

Tired of being in business for myself, I went back to school at Duquesne University's Paralegal Institute in Pittsburgh, where I received a General Practice Certificate last December (2013). I am currently looking for employment in that field, and would like to round out the last stage of my work life in some area of jurisprudence.

A rhetorical perspective is almost as natural to me as breathing. Overt and covert attempts at persuasion, whether written or spoken, are my legitimate targets for analysis, evaluation, and criticism. Of particular interest to the EL&U web site contributors would be, with some adaptations and modifications, the traditional canons of speech: style (elocutio), invention (inventio), organization (dispositio), memorability (memoria), and delivery (pronuntiatio or actio) .


Feb
19
revised What is “that day” in John 14:20?
inserted some new stuff
Feb
19
answered What is “that day” in John 14:20?
Feb
19
comment Do the specific gifts the father gives to the prodigal son have any special significance?
@Caleb: Uh, please correct me if I'm wrong, but who was the teller of the parable? Hint: It wasn't Mohammed!
Feb
19
comment 1 Cor 13 gongs and cymbals: waking the gods
Hey, Phillip: As a show of good faith, you might want to give me a couple "this comment adds something useful to the post" posts for my two comments above. They may not provide you with exact answers, but there's some good information there. Tell you what (in quid pro quo fashion), I'll +1 your question if you +1 my comments. Fair is fair, yes? Don
Feb
18
revised What does “suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin” in 1 Peter 4:1 mean?
major reorganization; corrected a few errata; eliminated unnecessary repetition; highlighted Bible verses
Feb
14
answered What is the accurate meaning of κεφαλὴ (kephalē) in 1 Cor 11:3?
Feb
14
comment What is John 15:10 really saying?
Good points. One thing seems to be missing. Jesus' most important commandment--and John his beloved disciple "got this right"--was to "love one another" (John 13:34; 15:12 & 15; 1 John 3:11 & 23; 4:7, 11, & 12). Without this key component, our interpretation of John 15:10 is missing something important. Do you agree? Don
Feb
12
comment How should 2 Thessalonians 2:1-3 be interpreted?
Thomas, one of the original Twelve, was once a higher critic. He wasn't about to fall for the stories being told by a bunch of hysterical women that Jesus had risen from the dead. "Unless I see in His hands the imprint of the nails, and put my finger into the place of the nails, and put my hand into His side, I will not believe," he said emphatically. Eight days later the resurrected Jesus said to him, "Reach here with your finger, and see My hands; reach here your hand and put it into My side; do not be unbelieving, but believing." Thomas then said to Jesus, "My Lord and my God!" Selah.
Feb
12
comment How should 2 Thessalonians 2:1-3 be interpreted?
"When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail." The hammer, of course, is the favored tool of the higher critics, and the nails in need of pounding (e.g., who REALLY wrote 2 Thessalonians) stem from their unbelief, arrogance, and pride. Throw in a little peer pressure and the fear of losing face if they happen to let it slip they're beginning to feel as though they and their peers are simply re-arranging deck chairs on the Titanic, while the people of faith whom they ridicule are living and dying for the Word of God, and what you end up with are a bunch of modern-day Pharisees.
Feb
11
comment What is the accurate meaning of κεφαλὴ (kephalē) in 1 Cor 11:3?
I'd feel more comfortable if in your question you change the word "position" to "role." In the Triune God there is perfect equality, since each person is fully God. At the same time, however, there are differing roles for each person in the Godhead. The Father begets the Son and sends him to become the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world. The Holy Spirit indwells every true believer in Jesus Christ and is, in a sense, Christ's surrogate here on earth. He comforts, teaches, fills, guides, convicts of sin, and delights in revealing the Son to God's image bearers here on earth.
Feb
9
comment How should 2 Thessalonians 2:1-3 be interpreted?
As for differing presuppositions, they are not only NOT off topic here, they are without exception at the very foundation of how one does hermeneutics. I'll defend to the death (slight exaggeration) your right to presuppose the biblical text is riddled with inconsistencies, outright errors, antiquated notions, and so on. When you do, however, just say "the majority of liberal scholars posit that __." I'll try to do the same in my postings, saying, e.g., "According the latest findings among the majority of conservative, Evangelical scholars, the apparent discrepancy can be harmonized by ____."
Feb
9
comment How should 2 Thessalonians 2:1-3 be interpreted?
I challenge your use of the term "majority." What I THINK you mean (correct me if I'm wrong) is: "the majority of liberal scholars." If I'm right, then you and I agree that the majority of liberal biblical scholars think 2 Thessalonians wasn't written by Paul. I would venture a guess, however, that the vast majority of CONSERVATIVE biblical scholars would take a contrary view; namely, that when a biblical epistle bears the name of the apostle Paul we can safely assume it was in fact written by Paul.
Feb
8
comment How should 2 Thessalonians 2:1-3 be interpreted?
Who are those scholars with the weighty opinions whom you refer to in the last paragraph of your answer? What makes their opinion weighty and the opinion of theologians and scholars who believe that Paul DID write Thessalonians not so weighty? Isn't it simply a matter of liberal versus conservative? (In other words, it's a matter of differing presuppositions; e.g., liberals tend to discount the reliability of the text, assuming that it cannot possibly be error-free, whereas conservatives see no reason why the text can't be error-free.) religioustolerance.org/chr_ntb3.htm Don
Feb
8
revised What is the proper translation of Genesis 32:28?
a few errata, and I added and/or subtracted a few words here and there
Feb
7
answered What is the proper translation of Genesis 32:28?
Feb
6
comment What language did Jesus commonly speak?
Great answer! A nitpicker might want to bust your chops for not being more punctiliously scrupulous in your citations, but not being a nitpicker of that sort, I commend you for the time and effort you invested in your answer. Recently, I've viewed some uTube videos on the Al Franken/Bill O'Reilly debate, in which Franken IS punctiliously scrupulous in verifying O'Reilly's public pronouncements. Each "side" has a point, I guess, but with whom one sides is likely determined by two colors: red and blue! Don
Feb
6
comment What is the meaning of Elijah's reply to Elisha in 1 Kings 19:20?
@Tau: Thanks for the vote of confidence. Someone just obviated your vote, however. Oh well . . .. Don
Feb
6
answered What does “Grace upon grace” mean?
Feb
5
answered What is the meaning of Elijah's reply to Elisha in 1 Kings 19:20?
Feb
4
comment 1 Cor 13 gongs and cymbals: waking the gods
An additional thought. See 1 Kings 18:20-46, but especially v.27, which reads: "It came about at noon, that Elijah mocked [the prophets of Baal] and said, 'Call out with a loud voice, for he is a god; either he is occupied or gone aside [i.e., he's relieving himself!] or is on a journey, or perhaps he is asleep and needs to be awakened.'" A humorous passage, to be sure. Of interest to you (and apropos your question) is Elijah's comment about Baal being asleep and in need being woken up! No gong is mentioned, but the idea of a god being asleep is laughable. Cf. Psalm 121:4. Don