2,925 reputation
218
bio website none
location Pittsburgh, PA
age 64
visits member for 1 year, 4 months
seen 2 days ago

For the last 57 years, I have been a practicing Christian (liberally conservative and evangelical). Should any posting I make to any Stack Exchange website pique your curiosity as to the what and why of my beliefs, feel free to communicate with me at drlarter@yahoo.com. I do not claim to have all the answers--let alone all the questions(!), but I would consider it a privilege to discuss Christianity with you in a rational and civilized fashion.

My wife (a native Egyptian and Christian) and I have been married over 41 years. We have two grown children who have flown the coop, making us empty nesters.

I have a Master's degree in Speech Communications and three years of doctoral studies in Rhetorical Theory at the University of Pittsburgh. After a brief stint as a teacher of public speaking, I embarked on a couple of different and totally divergent pursuits by owning and operating two small businesses.

Tired of being in business for myself, I went back to school at Duquesne University's Paralegal Institute in Pittsburgh, where I received a General Practice Certificate last December (2013). I am currently looking for employment in that field, and would like to round out the last stage of my work life in some area of jurisprudence.

A rhetorical perspective is almost as natural to me as breathing. Overt and covert attempts at persuasion, whether written or spoken, are my legitimate targets for analysis, evaluation, and criticism. Of particular interest to the EL&U web site contributors would be, with some adaptations and modifications, the traditional canons of speech: style (elocutio), invention (inventio), organization (dispositio), memorability (memoria), and delivery (pronuntiatio or actio) .


Sep
25
comment Use of “I, even I” and similar phrases
@omannay: I've made myself persona non grata here recently, but I'm sure things will get better, eventually. Thanks for your vote of confidence! Don
Sep
24
revised Use of “I, even I” and similar phrases
spelled out some abbreviations
Sep
23
answered Use of “I, even I” and similar phrases
Sep
22
comment What does Jesus mean by “Pray then like this:” before the “Lord's Prayer”
Great answer, Jack. Jesus' model prayer for his disciples is more of a paradigm than a pattern or template. From its first word, OUR, which indicates that prayer is a link to God for ALL Christians in the community of faith, to the last word, amen, which says in effect "according to Your will, not ours" (AMEN meaning "so be it," or "may it be thus"). A frequently heard expression in Christian circles today is "It's not about you." It's all about GOD: His character, His will, His word, His forgiveness, His enabling power, and His inherent right to reign and to rule, now and forever. Don
Sep
16
comment Why doesn't St. Paul use LOVE for each of the members, when he lays out the Rules for a Christian Households [Col 3:18-20]?
Couldn't have said it better, Frank Luke! Don
Sep
9
comment What does the oil in the ten virgins parable represent?
@Daи: If I'm not mistaken (though on rare occasions I am--back in aught-six, for example--1906, that is), I suggest your locution, "this is not a Christian site" is a bit of an overstatement. A more accurate description of the BHB site would be as follows: "Though BHB attracts many Christians--and Jews, for that matter--who contribute questions and answers, the site is not just for Christians and Jews but for people of all faiths or no faith at all. What unites us all is our interest in the Bible as a text worth interpreting." What thinkest thou? Don
Aug
28
comment Who were the “all” distributed to in Acts 2?
As important as preaching is in reaching the lost for Christ (through the demonstration of God's love AND the proclamation of God's love), discipling is also important. The local churches in which converts are discipled within the welcoming, accepting, and loving atmosphere of a family-type community are in the best position to be used of God to reach out to "non-family members" as ambassadors for the foreign policy of the kingdom of God and of our Lord Jesus Christ. Don
Aug
28
comment Who were the “all” distributed to in Acts 2?
It ain't either/or, man; it's both/and. Our brothers and sisters in Christ are family, and family comes first. Does that mean God doesn't care about non-family members? Of course not! God is no respecter of persons, and one of the best ways for Christians to evangelize is to earn the right to be heard, especially through good deeds, good examples, and sacrificial love. How is a baby in Christ going to learn how to earn the right to be heard? By being discipled by older, gifted, and more-mature family members within the church. The main verb in the Great Commission is "making disciples."
Aug
28
comment Why Moses ordered to keep virgins alive but kill all non-virgins and males in Numbers 31:17-18?
Biblical Hermeneutics Beta encourages answerers to provide proof to back up their statements. That proof may come from either biblical and/or extra-biblical sources. OPs and readers alike find citations helpful, particularly in the form of hyperlinks, particularly if they want to follow up on (or even check out!) your answer. Intelligent opinions, guesses, and hypotheses are welcome, but again, you need either to back them up with respected authorities or simply identify them as opinions, best guesses, and hypotheses. Even then, they should be backed up by logical proof. Best wishes! Don
Aug
28
comment Who were the “all” distributed to in Acts 2?
The greatest gift the nascent church in Jerusalem had to offer non-believers in need was healing, both spiritual and physical. A classic verse in this regard contains Peter's words to a man crippled from birth: "Then Peter said, 'Silver and gold have I none; but such as I have give I thee: In the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth rise up and walk'" (Acts 3:6 KJV). I'm sure that church members did share their wealth with unbelievers, but their priority was, rightly, meeting each others' needs first. "Do good unto all men," Paul said, "but especially to the household of faith"(Galatians 6:10).
Aug
18
revised Why did not the Apostle Paul ever say “In the name of him who says” (i.e., Heb. be-shem omro)?
added a few critical words
Aug
1
revised What is hermeneutics?
supplied a word that was missing
Jul
31
revised What is hermeneutics?
cleaned it up a bit
Jul
31
revised What is hermeneutics?
cleaned it up a bit; made it a bit easier to read
Jul
30
revised What is hermeneutics?
a few tweaks here and there
Jul
30
answered What is hermeneutics?
Jul
30
comment Why was Elijah so afraid of Jezebel that he fled immediately after performing a great miracle?
Yeah, I agree with your last sentence. It is said, "Even the gods have feet of clay." How much more do mere mortals like us expect to be free of the occasional doubt, fear, anxiety, depression, discouragement, and so on and so on. Don
Jul
29
revised What is the meaning of “Sorceress” in Exodus 22:18?
major overhaul
Jul
29
comment What is the meaning of “Sorceress” in Exodus 22:18?
@Daи: Do you really think witchcraft, sorcery, and the "black arts" have really changed that much over the centuries? I don't. I included the Shakespeare excerpt because it illustrates (but doesn't provide a "definition"--your word) artistically and fantastically the muttering of the sorceresses, whom Ellicott defined as mutterers of charms. I suppose if I looked really hard and could read ancient Hebrew and a few other ancient languages, I might be able to cite some actual incantations that were commonly used in the ANE, but the expenditure of time might be prohibitive.
Jul
29
revised What is the meaning of “Sorceress” in Exodus 22:18?
added a few crucial words in the last paragraph