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Jan
13
answered How does the translation of γενόμενον as “made (of)” imply a previous state of existence?
Jan
13
revised How does the translation of γενόμενον as “made (of)” imply a previous state of existence?
changed a key word
Jan
12
comment What is the meaning of “Sorceress” in Exodus 22:18?
@David: It's a red herring only if I used it in an attempt to slip something by someone, so to speak. That, rest assured, was not my intent. I even said the passage from Shakespeare was anachronistic. Lighten up, David. Empires are crumbling. Don
Jan
12
comment Circumcision / Flight into Egypt
I commend to you the reading of an article written by Hodge and Chaffey. It's here: answersingenesis.org/holidays/christmas/a-matter-of-time. The article provides what I consider to be a welcome balance to the oft-repeated charge of the "higher critics" that there are glaring contradictions in the Christmas timeline. Enjoy! Don
Jan
7
comment In 1st Timothy 5:17–18, is the “double honor” an imperative for pay?
@warren: IYHO, yes?
Jan
6
comment In 1st Timothy 5:17–18, is the “double honor” an imperative for pay?
+1. I wish you would've made the "double honor" expression even clearer by saying something to the effect that "The first honor is the respect he commands by being a good elder who preaches and teaches. The second honor is a salary/stipend/honorarium (or whatever you want to call it)." Each honor--respect and remuneration-- is a reward. The elder can waive the latter, however, when circumstances warrant it. If and when circumstances change, I see no reason why he shouldn't ask for the second honor. The apostle Paul obviously did both, each at different times, according to circumstances. Don
Jan
2
comment What was the tree of life in Genesis 2:9
I choose not to weigh in on this one, but I commend to you the reading of Revelation chapter 2 (especially v.7), and Revelation 22 (especially vv.2, 14, & 19). What was once forbidden and guarded by cherubim and a flaming sword in Genesis is in Revelation freely available to "overcomers" and to those who "wash their robes." Just a thought. Don
Jan
1
answered In Heb. 9:14, what is the meaning of the phrase πνεύματος αἰωνίου?
Jan
1
comment What is the ontological constitution of a believer according to Galatians 2:20?
Romans 6 also has some great explanatory material related to life and death. Don
Dec
29
comment Psalm 23, “…table in the presence of my enemies…”
+1. Fine answer. I've heard Ken Bailey preach on a couple of occasions. He has some fascinating insights borne of extensive research, as well as many years spent in the Middle East. A younger, though equally insightful Bible teacher is Ray Vanderlaan, whose video series "That the World May Know" is filled with insights on ANE culture, and the series sheds much needed light on biblical content. I also commend to you a little book written by G. Christian Weiss, called "Insights Into Bible Times and Customs," which the Back to the Bible Broadcast published back in '72. Good stuff. Don
Dec
23
comment How would Adam know what “you shall surely die” meant?
Whose sin was worse? Good question. God made Adam take the rap because he, being the head of the woman, surrendered his headship. (Much later, of course, Jesus took up the slack and became the second--& the last--Adam who did what Adam failed to do.) Could it be that Adam did what he did out of his love for Eve, thus turning his back on the person who should have been his first love: the LORD God? I don't know. It's worth a thought, I guess. If Adam chose not to sin, would God have created another Eve for him? Meh. What's done is done & we have 2 live with the consequences. Don
Dec
23
comment How would Adam know what “you shall surely die” meant?
whatever was behind door #2. What happened? They got zonked! Again, crazy! There is a certain craziness in sin, however. The Bible talks about the "mystery of iniquity" (2 Thess. 2:7), which means, in part, the whole notion of sin is cloaked in things we just cannot understand. We know that sin enters the picture via "the lust of the eyes & of the flesh, and the pride of life" (those things comprise the whole world system), but the why and the how and the timing contain elements of mystery. We do know, however, that Eve was deceived and then sinned; Adam, largely, sinned with eyes wide open.
Dec
23
comment How would Adam know what “you shall surely die” meant?
@JackDouglas: Good question. Is there an inevitability to sin such that the moment we begin to question God's directives, thereafter we will inevitably sin? James describes this process in 1:14 ff. I suggest we all read & meditate on James's insight, esp. v.17, which brings to mind (mine, anyways) the good & perfect gift God gave A&E in the form of who knows how many trees filled with delicious fruit. What did they do? They chose the one tree which was prohibited. Crazy! It's as though God went all "Monty Hall on them," gave them the big prize behind door #3 and they give it away for
Dec
23
comment How would Adam know what “you shall surely die” meant?
God have fellowship with one another until Eve came along? A day? A million years? How long did A & E as a married couple have fellowship with God before the deception and disobedience? A day? A week? A billion years? There were, I assume, many conversations between the first humans and their Creator, and while we haven't a clue as to the substance of those conversations, A & E certainly learned a great deal from them! BTW, the very word "death" is fraught with complications, since the words "in the day that you eat of it you will surely DIE" had both literal and metaphoric import. Don
Dec
23
comment How would Adam know what “you shall surely die” meant?
As I said in my original comment beneath your Q, a child need not know from experience how painful a burn can be in order to obey her parent by not touching the lit stove. She'll find out soon enough after she disobeys. Kinda the same thing with Adam, the "first man"--the one who blew it! Adam may not have fully (or even partially) understood what the word "death" meant, but he DID know what "DON'T eat from THAT tree" meant. As elegant and profound and parsimonious the first few chapters of Genesis are, they telescope reality, particularly re. the time elements involved. How long did Adam &
Dec
23
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Dec
23
comment How would Adam know what “you shall surely die” meant?
+1. While I applaud the way you stick to the text, I have to agree with what @ScottS said regarding your comment that Adam had the ability to understand what death was, "at least to a degree." I'd ask you to support that statement, but frankly I don't think you could, especially if you "stick to the text," which doesn't really give us a clue (one that I can see, that is). The main issue, as I see it, is obedience/disobedience, period. The brilliant apostle Paul contrasted one man's disobedience and the death that followed in its wake, with one man's obedience and the life that issued from it.
Dec
22
comment How would Adam know what “you shall surely die” meant?
(symbol-making, symbol-misusing) animal, inventor of the negative (or moralized by the negative), separated from his natural condition by instruments of his own making, goaded by the spirit of hierarchy (or moved by the sense of order), and rotten with perfection." I don't agree with Burke about man being the inventor of the negative; I think that's God's invention, but the rest of Burke's definition of man is pretty much spot on. Take out the word "animal" and substitute it with the word "creature," and the definition has much to commend it. Don
Dec
22
comment How would Adam know what “you shall surely die” meant?
+1. Lots of suppositions, but good suppositions. In fact, your idea of language being a gift from God to Adam is one supposition I share with you. The apostle John's title for Jesus in John chapter 1 is "The Word." There is something about the word, Word (or word, for that matter) which is deep and compelling. Before God's first creative act (or word!), did language exist within the Godhead? Surely there was communication and fellowship and love. Is there a heavenly language? Were angels given the gift of language, too? Kenneth Burke: "Man is the symbol-using
Dec
22
comment How would Adam know what “you shall surely die” meant?
To be sure, a perplexing question, Jack. While I do not dare to provide an answer, I will say this: When we tell our children "No. You mustn't do ____," they seldom understand fully the consequences of going against our command. Their ignorance in no way lessens the certainty of punishment for their disobedience--assuming the parents follow through on their punishment (unless of course it's a hot-stove issue, so the child's getting burned is sufficient punishment!). All the child needs in order to be able to obey or disobey is the necessary intelligence, which I assume Adam had in full. Don