2,297 reputation
116
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location Pittsburgh, PA
age 63
visits member for 10 months
seen 22 mins ago

For the last 56 years, I have been a practicing Christian (liberally conservative and evangelical). Should any posting I make to any Stack Exchange website pique your curiosity as to the what and why of my beliefs, feel free to communicate with me at drlarter@yahoo.com. I do not claim to have all the answers--let alone all the questions(!), but I would consider it a privilege to discuss Christianity with you in a rational and civilized fashion.

My wife (a native Egyptian and Christian) and I have been married over 40 years. We have two grown children who have flown the coop, making us empty nesters.

I have a Master's degree in Speech Communications and three years of doctoral studies in Rhetorical Theory at the University of Pittsburgh. After a brief stint as a teacher of public speaking, I embarked on a couple of different and totally divergent pursuits by owning and operating two small businesses.

Tired of being in business for myself, I went back to school at Duquesne University's Paralegal Institute in Pittsburgh, where I was certified recently as a paralegal. I am currently looking for employment in that field, and would like to round out the last stage of my work life in some area of jurisprudence.

A rhetorical perspective is almost as natural to me as breathing. Overt and covert attempts at persuasion, whether written or spoken, are my legitimate targets for analysis, evaluation, and criticism. Of particular interest to the EL&U web site contributors would be, with some adaptations and modifications, the traditional canons of speech: style (elocutio), invention (inventio), organization (dispositio), memorability (memoria), and delivery (pronuntiatio or actio) .


Dec
6
answered Reading the same thing 3 times in 18 verses
Dec
5
comment Was “Τετέλεσται” actually stamped on paid bills and debt certificates in the first century?
Whether or not Jesus' word, "Accomplished!", is somehow connected to the notion of "paid in full" may be a good question for this site. The fact remains that when Jesus said what He said on the cross, our sin debt was paid for in full. I am not encouraging preachers to play fast and loose with the text. Instead of saying, "Jesus EITHER said and meant __, OR Jesus meant and said ___," perhaps we should be saying "When Jesus cried 'Finished,' it meant that BOTH His work of redemption was accomplished AND our sin debt was paid in full." As is so often the case, it's not either/or but both/and.
Dec
5
comment Is it possible to be unbiased when interpreting Scripture?
@user2479: You're welcome, I'm sure. Thanks for the encouragement. Don
Dec
5
comment Is it possible to be unbiased when interpreting Scripture?
We must not give short shrift (not that you do) to the role of persuasion in getting people to change their minds. While it is possible for people to hash things out intra-personally and consequently change their religion, I suggest it's far from common. A more likely scenario involves reading some persuasive books; participating in stimulating debate; checking out (if only initially out of curiosity) what one's religious "enemies" have to say, instead of relying on what other people say they say; and/or listening to a persuasive speech or two from the "other side."
Dec
5
revised Is it possible to be unbiased when interpreting Scripture?
minor tweaks
Dec
4
answered Is it possible to be unbiased when interpreting Scripture?
Dec
3
comment What hermeneutical principal did Matthew use in 2:15 when quoting the Tanakh?
Thank you. Fine answer. As Dr. Enns observes, the New Testament writers, especially the Gospel writers, had had their eyes opened to the centrality of Christ in the Tanakh and were eager to spread the message that Jesus was in fact the long-awaited Messiah. Rhetoric (my specialty) enters the picture since not only were the Gospel writers persuaded of Jesus' messiah-ship, but they were desirous of persuading others of His messiah-ship, too. As for a label for Matthew's rule of interpretation, I guess we'd have to say it was the supremacy of the Christological principle of interpretation?
Dec
3
comment “My son” in Hosea 11:1 quoted in Matt. 2:14-15
Excellent answer! Why two people down-voted you is a mystery to me! (Though the down-votes probably numbered more than two, but the positive voters like me probably outnumber the negative voters). Yes, your writing style may need a little tweaking here and there, but the substance of what you have to say is spot on. See my question about Matthew's hermeneutic, which I posted in the last week or so (ca. December 1, 2013).
Dec
3
revised What hermeneutical principal did Matthew use in 2:15 when quoting the Tanakh?
major rewrite to narrow things down considerably
Nov
30
asked What hermeneutical principal did Matthew use in 2:15 when quoting the Tanakh?
Nov
26
answered 1Cor. 5:5: “To deliver such an one unto Satan for the destruction of the flesh” - In what way?
Nov
24
answered Do or do not judge: How is 1 Cor. 4:3-5 not contradictory to Cor. 5:12, 6:4-5?
Nov
24
comment Do or do not judge: How is 1 Cor. 4:3-5 not contradictory to Cor. 5:12, 6:4-5?
Well thought-out, well organized, and well expressed! Don
Nov
24
comment A Clearer Explanation
There's a pretty decent definition of both hermeneutics and exegesis here: christianity.stackexchange.com/questions/23053/… Best wishes. Don
Nov
23
revised What is the “Lot” in Proverbs 16:33
major re-writes, mostly in the form of tightening up my answer so as to pacify my critics
Nov
23
revised What is the “Lot” in Proverbs 16:33
fairly minor changes.
Nov
22
revised What is the “Lot” in Proverbs 16:33
spelling and capitalization corrections
Nov
22
answered What is the “Lot” in Proverbs 16:33
Nov
12
revised To what extent, if at all, should we look for one-to-one correlations between parables and real life?
added a negative illustration
Nov
10
comment To what extent, if at all, should we look for one-to-one correlations between parables and real life?
You're welcome, I 'm sure. Thank you for the encouragement. Don