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Jul
4
answered What does Jesus mean in John 10:34?
Jul
4
revised What does Jesus mean in John 10:34?
changed "none" to "one." BIG difference!
Jul
3
revised Did Moses call himself the “most humble man on the planet”?
a couple errata and minor changes in syntax
Jul
2
answered Did Moses call himself the “most humble man on the planet”?
Jun
24
comment How can we ensure a given “chiasm” was intentional by the author, and is not merely fanciful eisegesis?
See this [website][1] regarding the possible overlap between the figures of inclusio and chiasm. Compare Matthew's introductory verse (1:1) and his concluding verses which quote Jesus' words (28:18-20). In chapter 28, Jesus is simply commissioning His disciples to be involved in fulfilling the promise God gave to Abraham, Jesus' ancestor, according to the flesh ("genealogically")! Textbook inclusio. Don [1]: kevinfannystevenson.blogspot.com/2014/02/…
Jun
24
comment How can we ensure a given “chiasm” was intentional by the author, and is not merely fanciful eisegesis?
@Jas3.1: But God knew, and so did the apostles (in hindsight, of course; see Acts 3:22-23, and 7:37). My point: Usually, the writers of Scripture knew whereof they wrote, and in Dt 18, e.g., Moses, I imagine, thought he knew that the prophet whereof he spoke would arise in the generation after his death. Did he know of the "ultimate" prophet, who according to Peter would be raised up not only as a prophet, but as God's Servant (Acts 3:26a)? No. IOW, we can't make too much of authorial intent, especially with prophetic words originating under the Old Covenant (see Jesus' words in Jn 5:45-47).
Jun
24
comment How can we ensure a given “chiasm” was intentional by the author, and is not merely fanciful eisegesis?
@Jas3.1: From my answer: ". . . the human writers God used to pen His word were not automatons to whom God dictated!" There were times in their writing of the Bible when the authors did not have a full understanding of what they wrote. Moses, e.g., didn't know beans about Jesus Christ when he wrote, "The LORD your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among you, from your countrymen, you shall listen to him." And, "'I will raise up a prophet from among their countrymen like you, and I will put My words in his mouth, and he shall speak to them all that I command him'"(Dt 18:15,18).
Jun
24
revised How can we ensure a given “chiasm” was intentional by the author, and is not merely fanciful eisegesis?
fairly minor touch-ups here and there; some formatting changes
Jun
24
comment How can we ensure a given “chiasm” was intentional by the author, and is not merely fanciful eisegesis?
@FrankLuke: Good point. A good definition and biblical illustrations can be found at <kevinfannystevenson.blogspot.com/2014/02/…; Don
Jun
21
reviewed Leave Open Did Jesus primarily use an exegetical or hermeneutical approach in explaining the meaning of the Hebrew Scriptures?
Jun
21
reviewed Leave Open Who were the scholars responsible for the New English Translation?
Jun
16
awarded  Yearling
May
29
revised How to interpret John 6:32-33
fixed a couple errata
May
27
revised How to interpret John 6:32-33
judicious rewording here
May
26
answered How to interpret John 6:32-33
May
24
revised What does the word 'idols' mean in 1 John 5:21 and what exactly is idolatry?
minor fixup
May
17
comment Who is 'us' in 2 Peter 1
While I respect ScottS's answer, below, I can't help but feel there is no deeper significance or unusual logic involved in Peter's changing from first person singular to first person plural to second person plural, and then back again, and back and forth. To me, the switching back and forth is quite natural and logical and normal, and I would do the same thing were I to write to an assembly of Christians where my wife and I ("us") used to be members with them ("you" plural), especially if the purpose of my letter was to encourage and exhort them to progress in their faith.
May
16
comment Who is the “True Companion” in Philippians 4:3?
@David: How right you are. I've corrected my blunder. Thanks! Don
May
16
revised Who is the “True Companion” in Philippians 4:3?
made a correction or two
May
15
awarded  Custodian