3,116 reputation
218
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location Pittsburgh, PA
age 64
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
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For the last 57 years, I have been a practicing Christian (liberally conservative and evangelical). Should any posting I make to any Stack Exchange website pique your curiosity as to the what and why of my beliefs, feel free to communicate with me at drlarter@yahoo.com. I do not claim to have all the answers--let alone all the questions(!), but I would consider it a privilege to discuss Christianity with you in a rational and civilized fashion.

My wife (a native Egyptian and Christian) and I have been married over 41 years. We have two grown children who have flown the coop, making us empty nesters.

I have a Master's degree in Speech Communications and three years of doctoral studies in Rhetorical Theory at the University of Pittsburgh. After a brief stint as a teacher of public speaking, I embarked on a couple of different and totally divergent pursuits by owning and operating two small businesses.

Tired of being in business for myself, I went back to school at Duquesne University's Paralegal Institute in Pittsburgh, where I received a General Practice Certificate last December (2013). I am currently looking for employment in that field, and would like to round out the last stage of my work life in some area of jurisprudence.

A rhetorical perspective is almost as natural to me as breathing. Overt and covert attempts at persuasion, whether written or spoken, are my legitimate targets for analysis, evaluation, and criticism. Of particular interest to the EL&U web site contributors would be, with some adaptations and modifications, the traditional canons of speech: style (elocutio), invention (inventio), organization (dispositio), memorability (memoria), and delivery (pronuntiatio or actio) .


Feb
22
revised What is the meaning of “violence” in Matthew 11:12?
deleted a few extra words
Feb
21
answered What is the meaning of “violence” in Matthew 11:12?
Feb
20
comment How does one reconcile John's account of the baptism of Jesus with that of the synoptic gospels chronologically?
Frankly, I do not see any need to reconcile the four accounts. John's wording IS a little tricky, but the way I read 1:29-34 is as follows: 1) Jesus' baptism had already taken place; 2) John IDs Jesus as God's Lamb; 3) John identifies himself as the forerunner, and Jesus as the "royalty" whom he preceded; 4) John says twice that he did not recognize Jesus as the Messiah UNTIL His baptism; 5) John testifies that he HAS SEEN Jesus being anointed with the Holy Spirit at His baptism (see #1, above); 6) at the baptism is where John recognized Messiah Jesus bec. the HS descended & REMAINED on Him.
Feb
20
comment “How did Jesus' ”teaching with authority“ differ from the Scribes?”
@user2479: You're welcome. Yes to your question. I'm at a loss as to how I would describe the style and delivery of Jesus, however. He certainly did not mince words; He called a spayed a spayed. He went to the heart of issues and did not pussyfoot around the hot-button issues of His day. He condemned hypocrisy, which was endemic, particularly within Pharisaism. To this day, the very word denotes hypocrisy! He also re-interpreted the Law of Moses in a particularly powerful way: "You've heard it was said . . . , but I SAY UNTO YOU . . .." Saying that sort of thing took guts!
Feb
20
revised “How did Jesus' ”teaching with authority“ differ from the Scribes?”
erratum
Feb
19
answered “How did Jesus' ”teaching with authority“ differ from the Scribes?”
Feb
18
comment Who did Jesus preach to in 1 Peter 3:19?
+1, despite your comment about critical scholars, many (if not most) of whom have an axe to grind. Less metaphoric: their presuppositions are decidedly biased regarding the authorship of the various books of the Bible. Thanks to these "higher critics" concepts such as Deutero-Isaiah have gained a foothold in the ivory towers of many seminaries, and the very concept of the inspiration of Scripture is derided as risible. I'm obviously painting with a broad brush; a kernel of truth still applies, however. Again, kudos on a well-thought-out answer. Don
Feb
16
revised When did Joseph, Jesus's father, die?
minor tweaks here and there, mostly punctuation 'n @.
Feb
15
comment What is the significance of “to them” in Gen 1:28 v 1:22
Good Q. Have you ever thought the similarity between the two commands is because all of us--humans, animals, fish, and birds--are critters? We all have our origin in the creative and omnipotent hand of a loving Creator. The same creative genius God demonstrated in making the human species in His image, of which David marveled in Psalm 139 ("I am fearfully and wonderfully made"), is the same genius He demonstrated in making the critters which do NOT bear His image. It's all a matter of degree and purpose. BTW, have you ever seen a slow-mo video of a hummingbird in flight? Awe inspiring!
Feb
14
comment What “filthiness of the flesh and spirit” is Paul talking about in 2 Cor. 7:1?
@Amaterasu: Good. I'm glad you "kind of understand." If you have any questions about this post, or any questions in general, feel free to email me at drlarter@yahoo.com. I can't guarantee I'll have any answers, but I'm pretty good at finding them! Don
Feb
14
comment What is the “great mystery” in Ephesians 5:32?
@Daи: Thank you. Don
Feb
14
answered What is the “great mystery” in Ephesians 5:32?
Feb
14
comment What is the “great mystery” in Ephesians 5:32?
Upvote from me, just because. Don
Feb
14
comment What is the significance of the author of Genesis using two different designations for God?
Good Q! I wouldn't touch your last citation ("H.B. Witter . . .") with a ten-foot pole, but leave it, rather, to the hermeneutical scholars. I will say that in general, from Job to Chronicles the Bible's authors use so many names and titles for God, including the hyphenated names, such as YHWH-Tsidkenu (Jer 23:6), YHWH-Rohi (Ps 23:1), and YHWH-Jireh (Gen 22:14), to underscore a particular attribute of, or truth about, God's infinitely perfect and multifaceted personhood. That the names vary, stems in part from a given author's purpose of using--in context of course--a particular name of God.
Feb
14
comment What “filthiness of the flesh and spirit” is Paul talking about in 2 Cor. 7:1?
@Daи: No offense taken. Ya does what ya has to does; I know I do. Don
Feb
13
revised Meaning of the Parable of the Sower
not exactly a major rewrite, but . . .
Feb
12
answered Meaning of the Parable of the Sower
Feb
12
comment Meaning of the Parable of the Sower
Excellent answer. Well thought out, well reasoned, and interesting at the same time. The "word does the work" comment is good, but it may miss the point. The word's seeming inability to work in 3 of 4 cases is not the fault of the word; it's the fault of the hearers of the word. I may develop this thought in my own answer. You've laid a great foundation. Kudos. Don
Feb
11
comment When did Joseph, Jesus's father, die?
@FrankLuke: Yes. Good point. However, Jesus' critics did go on to say, "whose father and mother we know." As for the thinking of the translators who translated this phrase, I guess we'd need to engage in a thoroughgoing hermeneutic to determine what that particular phrase meant back then. Can we infer, for example, that in saying these words, Jesus' critics assumed that both of Jesus' parents were alive? I don't know. Let me know if you unearth an answer to my last question. Don
Feb
11
revised When did Joseph, Jesus's father, die?
added a key verse