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Apr
7
comment What did Satan mean, when he replied to God, “Skin for Skin”?
@Bagpipes: Offhand, I'd say that the skin condition with which Job was afflicted may have caused his skin to turn black. After all, Satan "smote Job with sore boils from the sole of his foot to the crown of his head" (2:7). Evidently, Job got some relief by scraping the boils with a fragment of broken pottery (2:8). Not a pretty sight, by any means!
Mar
17
comment Why is the word ἐβαπτίσθη used in Luke 11:38?
What you have here is an instance of Synoptic differences. Two folks witness (or are told about) an incident through the eyes of two or more people. One person or group "sees" the same incident differently than the other person or group. I, for example, can see a neighbor of mine dutifully washing his car. Another person sees the same person lovingly detailing his car. We both see the same behavior, but characterize it differently. In the Synoptic Gospels, something similar is occurring. Thanks to the Holy Spirit, the perspectives, though different, are equally true, accurate, and significant.
Mar
17
revised Concealing & revealing in Proverbs 25:2
errata
Mar
8
revised What is the “Lot” in Proverbs 16:33
change of phrase
Mar
6
comment Why delay a blessing by asking for food?
Maybe Esau's stew was to die for! (A joke.)
Mar
6
comment What is the intended image of “pierced my hands and feet” in Psalm 22:16?
We'll need to agree to disagree agreeably on the nature of your hyperlink, Dick. It clearly has a liberal bias. A quick perusal of the menu of its various topics (e.g., "The Bible") reveals this to be the case. That's OK, too. "Fundamentalists" have their own biases, too. Truth is, we all do. About all we can aim for, whether liberal or conservative, is a fair fight with a minimum of ad hominems, ill will, and what I call "Job 12:2 thinking." I'll delete my last comment, Dick, and I'll venture forth to the Chat room. Don
Mar
6
comment What is the intended image of “pierced my hands and feet” in Psalm 22:16?
metaphors and similes and neglect to take away the main point of the psalm; namely, that the psalmist is relaying to us some horrible, awful, frightening, and injurious experience, which causes him to feel initially as though God has forsaken him. At the psalm's end (really, from v.22 ff.), however, he realizes God was well aware of his affliction and had not forsaken him after all (see esp. vv.22, 24, and 26). By the way, we need not force v.16 to be Messianic. Among the injuries Jesus sustained on the cross, however (not so coincidentally), were severe wounds in his hands and feet.
Mar
6
comment What is the intended image of “pierced my hands and feet” in Psalm 22:16?
I suggest you not overthink this one. There MAY be some unknown, unexplained cultural significance vis a vis the verse in question. Evidently there are ancient depictions of a lion pinning a man to the ground, so the lion metaphor isn't necessarily "out." If a band of thugs is surrounding me and tearing at me like a pack of dogs, I'll likely sustain AT LEAST defensive wounds on my hands, and if they kick me to the ground, I could wind up with defensive wounds on my feet from my attempt to kick/push my attackers away. The point is: we can get sidetracked in pinning down the meaning of the
Mar
5
answered What did Satan mean, when he replied to God, “Skin for Skin”?
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
@MatthewMiller: Jesus was not "looking for a bride"; he was seeking and saving the lost. Jesus began that work in Samaria by introducing himself to one lone Samaritan whose witness in Samaria started a chain reaction of faith in Jesus the Messiah. To get sidelined into an interpretation of the text which is about as far from John's purpose in writing his Gospel as is possible to go is to pursue a tangent which diverges from the truth. John wrote his Gospel "so that [his readers] may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing [they] may have life in His name" (20:31).
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
@MatthewMiller: The allegorical approach has been around for millennia. Midrashic hermeneutics had its Sod (sood or sawd) approach to Scripture, which looked for hidden, secret, and mystical meanings in ways which would make the biblical writers scratch their heads incredulously and say, "But I didn't mean that!" When Jesus explained (i.e., "hermeneuticked") to Cleopas & the other disciple on Emmaus Road "the things concerning himself in all the Scriptures," do you REALLY think he interpreted those "things" allegorically? Email me (see my profile) & I'll send you Jesus' sermon outline! Don
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
@MatthewMiller: Guess we'll need to agree to disagree agreeably. I cannot honestly see any good in coming from your approach to Scripture. It seems fanciful, highly subjective, highly symbolic--allegorical, even, and is not supported by a commonsense reading of the text. Granted, there is a depth to the Scripture which none of us will ever plumb, and no single method of interpretation can unlock all its treasures. Nevertheless, a spiritualizing hermeneutic can often--and has!--become a "slippery slope" which leads to an erratic and risible, even, approach to interpreting the Bible.
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
For an interesting and informative verse-by-verse exposition of John 4, check out this site: christiancourier.com/articles/282-jesus-and-the-samaritan-woman. Don
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
@MatthewMiller: Your hermeneutic is certainly, uh, unique! Mine is informed by a middle-of-the-road, mostly conservative Evangelicalism. Accordingly, I look at Jesus' interaction with the woman at the well as the consequence of his being led by the Spirit to this particular woman at this particular time, so that the good news of the kingdom could take root not only in her heart but also in her fellow townspeople. Very possibly, the success of Philip the evangelist among the Samaritans years later was attributable to the seeds Jesus had sowed in the 2 days he spent in Sychar (see Acts 8:5-25).
Mar
2
answered Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
Feb
23
revised What is the context in Mark and Luke as regards the buying and preparing of the spices?
a couple errata
Feb
23
comment Concealing & revealing in Proverbs 25:2
I guess what I'm saying is that a proverb squeezes a great nugget of truth into very few words, but it doesn't squeeze everything! One "app" of searching things out is in matters of justice; another is in matters of everyday ethics; another is in not-so-common commonsense; another is acquiring a spiritual understanding which was heretofore a bit of a mystery; and so on. About God concealing sin; well, that's another app (see Prov 10:12; 17:9; and 1 Pet 4:8), although the second half of the proverb (i.e., 25:2) makes that app a little forced. (It's still true, however!).
Feb
23
comment Concealing & revealing in Proverbs 25:2
@Jas.3.1: One interpretation; many applications. Solomon, for example, searched out the legal, moral, ethical, and spiritual implications of the case of the two harlots who gave birth to two babies, one of whom died (see 1 Kings 3:16 ff.). You'll recall that one harlot did the ol' switcheroo (her dead baby for the living baby) and then had the temerity to tell King Sol the living baby was hers! Sol offered to divide the child in two, and the rest is history. Notice that "all Israel heard of the king's judgment . . . [and] saw the wisdom of God was in him to administer judgment" (v.28).
Feb
22
answered Concealing & revealing in Proverbs 25:2
Feb
20
revised What is “that day” in John 14:20?
minor word change