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bio website timgallant.com
location Tennessee
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visits member for 1 year, 3 months
seen Apr 11 at 14:33

I hold an M.Div. from Mid-America Reformed Seminary (2000) and am an independent scholar-publisher. Primary fields of biblical expertise are in Pauline studies, but I have also done considerable work in many other biblical and theological areas, including sacraments, covenant theology, etc.


Jun
19
comment Can the word translated as “messiah” be considered a title when referring to Jesus?
Agree with Frank. The notion that Paul uses Christos as a surname has nothing to do with the Greek text, and doesn't account for the fact that he places Christos both before and after Iesous. The truth of the matter is that Paul used the term just as one would expect from a 1st century Jew who believed something of eschatological significance had occurred. I.e. he used the term to refer to Jesus as the Messiah.
Jun
13
comment Did Jesus endorse tithing for all when addressing the Pharisees?
Some good stuff here, but (1) your answer appears to leap from what Jesus is saying in the text; and (2) strictly tying tithing to the temple would not seem tenable in terms of the Hebrew Scriptures, since Genesis indicates that Jacob vowed a tithed to Yahweh as well (Gen 28:22). Moreover, Hebrews 7:2, 4 says that Abraham paid tithes to Melchizedek.
Jun
13
comment Did Jesus endorse tithing for all when addressing the Pharisees?
Mike, I think your answer would do better without the mention to churches which support the continuance of tithing, which neither addresses the exegetical question that was asked nor follow from your own biblical argumentation, since your reading seems to be that the Pharisees were not at fault for tithing per se, but for imposing extrabiblical rules and engaging in other practices.
Jun
12
comment How can we understand 1 Corinthians 12 without contradiction
ζηλοῦτε in 12:31 could be translated as an indicative. I suggest that should be thought through as a possibility, although the occurrences in 14:1, 39 appear to be rightly rendered as imperatives.
Jun
12
comment Why does Numbers 29:39 (LXX) refer to “your salvation” instead of “peace offerings”?
Good catch. This of course simply brings the question back a level. Why would the LXX employ σωτηρίοv to refer to peace offerings?
Jun
5
comment Why does the Peshitta use the word ‘baptism’ for ‘enlightened’ in Hebrews 6:4?
Heh. I'm not expert enough on the Fathers to do that without further research, but I've read enough to be aware of the connection they made. (I've done a fair amount of work on the sacraments in Scripture, but not much in connection with the 2nd–3rd century Church.)
Jun
5
comment What does 'Salt of the Earth' mean?
Interesting, pterandon... but I really don't see any exegetical demonstration there, e.g. usage in other biblical contexts.
Jun
4
comment Is John 16:31 meant to be a question?
Just a note that Augustine would be in Latin, not Greek.
Jun
4
comment Why does the Peshitta use the word ‘baptism’ for ‘enlightened’ in Hebrews 6:4?
The Early Church thought of baptism as enlightenment. Why they did that would require an essay, but it readily explains the Peshitta.
Jun
3
comment What is the meaning of “day and hour unknown”?
Amos, I think one issue that would need to be addressed there is whether He speaks in more than one sense of His coming, i.e. of the possibility of multiple comings. So without necessarily disagreeing with you regarding this text, I would want to see a bit of work showing that in this case, He is actually talking in the close context of something about to happen.
Jun
3
comment What does “born again” from John 3:3 mean?
I find it interesting that people vote down my response without bothering to comment why.
Jun
2
comment Did the Jerusalem Council intend to replace the Torah?
No, certainly not. But the apostles weren't giving Gentiles a free pass, either.
Jun
1
comment Would the Pharisees go to Pilate and secure the tomb on the Sabbath?
Note: the term we translate "day of preparation" was almost certainly a technical term for "Friday." (Sorry, no sources here, but I've read a number of scholars make a good case for this.) In view therefore is not "the day before Passover," but Friday, the day before the weekly Sabbath.
Jun
1
comment When did separation between Israel and Judah happen?
It should be noted that Solomon's division of the labour force almost certainly contributed to the later political division, because it favoured Judah. This explains how Jeroboam (who was over the labour force—and "force" apparently describes it—for the tribe of Ephraim) had to flee until Solomon's death. Apparently, he began to agitate while in that role. See 1 Kg 11:26ff.
Jun
1
comment Why did the Samaritans worship God in Mount Gerissim rather than Jerusalem?
For the sake of accuracy, it would be better to refer to Samaritans as having partial Israelite ethnicity; this would not have been primarily Jewish (if at all), but drawn from tribes of the northern kingdom. They were the remnants of the "people of the land," intermarried with the settlers from other nations whom the Assyrians transplanted among them.
May
31
comment Genesis 3:13 Does the Hebrew actually say הִשִּׁיאַ֖נִי deceived ME?
I see now there's some question of ambiguity with Kate's question. I didn't catch that she was distinguishing between the presence of me or not, just whether the action was past or ongoing.
May
30
comment Signficance of name change from Saul to Paul
The parallels are all excellent observations, and I think they are significant. In fact, I think that even more could be said, such as the fact that Saul was waging war against God's anointed king, David; "Saul II" was waging war against God's anointed (messiah) king, the Son of David. I don't believe, however, that there was a change of name; and given the early parts of Romans 11, I'm not convinced that Paul himself is concerned to "break" the connection.
May
30
comment Signficance of name change from Saul to Paul
That's an interesting thought, Matthew. I don't really lean that way, though. I seems to me that since he was primarily working among Gentiles, he would have gone this route regardless. On the other hand, the fact that Luke is talking about Sergius Paulus may have prompted him to mention Paul's other name specifically at this point.
May
30
comment Who or what are the “no gods” in Galatians 4:8?
Viz, "we Jews" were under the stoicheia in the form of Torah; "you Gentiles" were under the stoicheia when you served those which are not in fact gods; and thus, now that you are adopting Torah, you are again turning to bondage to the stoicheia.
May
30
comment Who or what are the “no gods” in Galatians 4:8?
Thanks, Joseph. I guess my earlier explanation wasn't quite clear... In my view, Paul uses "elements of the world" (stoicheia kosmou) analogously to how the ancients viewed the constitutive elements of the world, but in a sort of eschatological/metaphorical sense. That is, the world (kosmos) before/outside of Christ is made up of certain things. Those elements include Torah, but Torah is one of a subset. One of the tricky things to deal with is that Paul goes back and forth between "we" and "you," and in my view that's very intentional in this context. (to be continued)