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Apr
28
comment Leviticus 20:27 - Why is this verse at the end of the chapter?
And why does it "especially include those who consulted demons," as opposed to those who sacrifice their children?
Apr
27
comment Leviticus 20:27 - Why is this verse at the end of the chapter?
Yes, but death was the punishment for several of the other prohibitions mentioned in this chapter. Why is this one singled out?
Apr
27
awarded  Student
Apr
27
comment Leviticus 20:27 - Why is this verse at the end of the chapter?
Either way, as the phrase "dying let him die" is used several times in the chapter, your answer would have to explain why the mystics are singled out.
Apr
27
comment Leviticus 20:27 - Why is this verse at the end of the chapter?
While I don't know Latin, the Hebrew (and every English translation) has the verse in the active sense - "shall surely be put to death". In addition, the Latin phrase "morte moriantur\moriatur" appears several times in that chapter, and is sometimes translated in the passive, "dying let him die," and sometimes in the active, "be put to death." I don't know why there's a difference, as the same identical active phrase is used in the original Hebrew for all the verses.
Apr
27
comment Leviticus 20:27 - Why is this verse at the end of the chapter?
I'm not sure how your explanation fits with vs 2, which talks about one who offers his child to the Molech fire-god. Such a person should also be outside the realm of holiness. +1 anyways.
Apr
27
asked Leviticus 20:27 - Why is this verse at the end of the chapter?
Apr
24
awarded  Editor
Apr
24
revised Meaning of (et)“את” and (v'et)“וְאֵ֥ת” in Genesis 1:1
added hebrew text
Apr
24
suggested suggested edit on Meaning of (et)“את” and (v'et)“וְאֵ֥ת” in Genesis 1:1
May
24
comment Which 'modern' English translation of the Bible is considered the 'closest' or most accurate translation?
Of all the translations I've come across, The Schocken Bible by Everett Fox is the most interesting one. It tries to not only be super-literal, but also to keep the "feel" and rhythm of the original Hebrew. amazon.com/The-Five-Books-Moses-Deuteronomy/dp/0805211195
May
24
awarded  Supporter
May
24
comment Was nûn deleted from Psalm 145 in the Masoretic Text?
Support for the interpolation approach is based on the fact that the Nun line is nearly identical to verse 17 (צ). See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psalm_145#The_.22Missing_Verse.22 for details.