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Mar
7
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
Thank you @Susan! Could you tell me which part is controversial and needs more proof? I think the most controversial claim I made was the one that you questioned me on.
Mar
6
comment Did Mark intend to end his gospel at 16:8?
@soldarnal - it looks like you've been interested in this question. I've added my answer below.
Mar
6
revised Did Mark intend to end his gospel at 16:8?
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Mar
6
revised Did Mark intend to end his gospel at 16:8?
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Mar
6
comment Did Ruth uncover Boaz' feet, or something else?
Very interesting! Of the four OT women mentioned in Matthew 1, three have had inappropriate sexual encounters. Tamar had sex with her father-in-law, Rahab was a harlot, and Bathsheba had an affair with David. Ruth, however, has never seemed to fit that pattern. Perhaps she does.
Mar
6
answered Did Mark intend to end his gospel at 16:8?
Mar
4
accepted Why does Matthew include these women in Jesus' genealogy?
Mar
4
awarded  Famous Question
Mar
4
revised Why did Jesus enter Jerusalem on a donkey?
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Mar
4
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
@Susan, I'm sorry I forgot to tag you in my last comment. I'm not sure if you got the message.
Mar
4
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
I have added the reference. As you can see from my answer I'm most skeptical about this part of my answer as well. I list it only as a possibility. But I do thinks it's an inference which is built on a much stronger foundation. First two points do not derive directly from Eslinger but are found in a number of academic books and journals. The third point (the history of this plot of ground) is a personal discovery but one that I think makes a great deal of sense given the explicit and implicit references to marriage. And as I have said this not only time that allusions to marriage appear in Jo
Mar
4
revised Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
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Mar
4
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
@Susan, I found this in the paper "The Wooing of the Woman at the Well: Jesus, the Reader and Reader-Response Criticism" by Lyle Eslinger. It's a while since I made a copy and I don't see in which book or journal it appears. But I do have a note that states it originally appeared in Literature and Theology 1/1 (1987) pp 167-83. My copy goes from page 165-182. The reference you seek occurs on pg 176-177. There's an extensive footnote at the bottom of the page which lays out the case for the sexual overtones in this word. The author cites a number of additional sources. Do you want me to quote?
Mar
4
revised Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
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Mar
3
comment Why did Jesus enter Jerusalem on a donkey?
That is interesting. 2 Kings 9:13. My total speculation is that the "mule" was only a part of the corination of the davidic Kings. But this detail certainly lends weight to the idea that this is a coronation ceremony.
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
@rhetorician Cery true! But why does that exclude jesus looking for his bride in the people he is saving? Isn't that what the NT says he is doing elsewhere? The wedding/marriage imagery is a metaphor of salvation. I still haven't seen you engage with the evidence I have presented. Your ignoring and not offering any rebuttal.
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
one more thing. You said it's not a common sense reading of the text. That certainly begs the question whose common sense. John wasn't written for our 21st century American multimedia fed culture. It was written for a first century, largely illiterate culture with many beliefs that are absolutely foreign to our own. They heard and read texts in ways that is not at all common to our world.
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
my approach isnt allegorical. I'm focused on authorial-intent. I wouldn't read every biblical author this way. But I read John this way for a number of reasons deriving from his writings. John invites he's readers to read his gospel this way. He does first through the misunderstands and through his metaphors.
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
may I ask why you find it subjective? I didn't come up with many of these connections. Scholars have been noting them for the past forty years. And they were noted in the early church. But don't you think that subjectivity is diminished with a pattern of consistent evidence? That's what we have here. Allusions are a fundamental tool of John. You believe that John 1:1 alludes to Genesis 1:1, right? Which connection that I've pointed to do you disagree?
Mar
3
comment Why does Jesus tell the Samaritan woman to “Go, call your husband”?
I'm an evangelical too. And my hermeneutic is by no means unique. It's actually quite common among scholars even evangelical ones. I read the gospels as literary constructs. While they are based on historical events they are not the events themselves. They are arranged, edited and interpreted through the spirit inspired author.