681 reputation
315
bio website
location Glarus, Switzerland
age
visits member for 1 year, 7 months
seen Jan 8 at 4:36

Trusting in the God of Abraham. Loving Law and Prophets. Believing Christ and his Apostles. Found fathers in Paul, Job, Moses, John. Adoring Daniel and Jeremiah. Trying to live in Christ (and for that reason hating foolish images and carven crosses and similar stuff).

hannes


Jul
18
comment In John 14:2, what is Jesus' Father's house?
It suggests a kind of restlessness. One gets driven hither and tither, and there seems to be no place to stay.
Jul
18
comment In John 14:2, what is Jesus' Father's house?
The difficulty with your approach is
Jul
17
answered How is it that Jesus could be “three days and three nights in the heart of the earth”?
Jul
17
revised The number 40's “real meaning”
added 12 characters in body
Jul
17
comment Was Jesus raised 'for our justification' or 'because of' it?
This link shows a discussion of some divergent opinions about Aristotle's use of 'dia' (strictly causal vs. final) in his Nikomachean Ethics. books.google.at/…
Jul
16
comment Was Jesus raised 'for our justification' or 'because of' it?
We seem to be chasing Aristotle while we are having Paul already. The philosopher's thoughts on the four causes are undisputed - you supplied a link. However, they do not add much more than a little nuance to the debated verse. (We have come to a point where he disturbs more than he helps.) Perhaps you are right in that: we should have stayed with Paul.
Jul
16
comment Was Jesus raised 'for our justification' or 'because of' it?
If Aristotle had developed his thoughts not before the time of Paul, it would be of lesser value as it may not have reached Paul and his readers. In fact Aristotle did not invent that meaning of 'dia'. It was already there. As it is in the English 'for'. I will add a citation where he used dia with final meaning, if you wish so. With or without Aristotle Paul obviously used it in that sense as in the other (final and causal in the narrower sense of the word).
Jul
16
comment Was Jesus raised 'for our justification' or 'because of' it?
I mentioned Aristotle because he understands an end as a cause. And by asking for this (final) cause - dia ti - he comments on this aspect of the meaning of dia. The thing about the sciences I mentioned to remind of our training in disregarding finality as a cause.
Jul
16
revised Was Jesus raised 'for our justification' or 'because of' it?
added 155 characters in body
Jul
16
comment In John 14:2, what is Jesus' Father's house?
@Mike Bull. You are supplying fireworks of references in many of your postings. Many of them are interesting. A few appear somewhat grotesque e.g. the animals in Noah's Ark as kings and priests. One might conclude the Bible were a work of references to references which again lead to references only to refer you back to where you started off. What will be left after all referential symbols are done away with?
Jul
16
comment In John 14:2, what is Jesus' Father's house?
@FrankLuke. I believe Mike is referring to the parody about the rich man in hell and the poor one that comes to sit in Abraham's bosom in the more pleasant compartment. So the House of the Father would after this view be in Hades. However, I am not sure Mike Bull would subscribe.
Jul
16
revised The number 40's “real meaning”
added 7 characters in body
Jul
16
answered The number 40's “real meaning”
Jul
16
comment In John 14:2, what is Jesus' Father's house?
@stanly john. Hi! Why do you say "definitely heaven" when the scriptures still refer to Him as the Coming One?
Jul
14
revised Was Jesus raised 'for our justification' or 'because of' it?
deleted 1 characters in body; added 2 characters in body
Jul
14
answered Was Jesus raised 'for our justification' or 'because of' it?
Jul
10
comment Translation questions “right, may, might” as listed below
@Erin - Even if translated to their best, some texts are still difficult to understand fully. The time they were written was so different from our time, so that if we needed to understand the scriptures fully, there were no hope for anyone. But every little word that we come to understand better is a gift and often joyful. (e.g. to understand the context of 1 John 5:11-12 one needs to almost dive into the time and the severely difficult circumstances John was facing with the disciples)
Jul
10
answered Translation questions “right, may, might” as listed below
Jul
9
comment Why does the Bible say that Abraham sacrificed his “only-begotten son”?
I am also thinking about the Psalm in which God is said to pronounce: You are my son. Today I have generated (gegenneka) you. (2:7) The generating here obviously has a meaning far beyond biological fathering. (Inthronisation and kingship are addressed.)
Jul
9
comment Why does the Bible say that Abraham sacrificed his “only-begotten son”?
Hi Eric. I'm not sure yet what to conclude. It may be the LXX tried to improve what they saw not accurate in the Hebrew text. The way the Letter to the Hebrews renders it obviously supports the reading that excludes Ishmael.