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location Pacific Northwest, USA
age 94
visits member for 1 years
seen Jan 23 at 4:25

Software developer of database driven airline/aviation industry related applications; a regular reader of biblical languages (Hebrew and Greek); and an aspirant to both professional and exegetical disciplines.


Apr
21
comment What does “break bread” mean in Acts 20:7 and 11?
Jer 16:7 [LXX] is the only verse that I find in the OT that has the verb for "break" and the object "bread" in Greek: καὶ οὐ μὴ κλασθῇ ἄρτος ἐν πένθει αὐτῶν εἰς παράκλησιν ἐπὶ τεθνηκότι οὐ ποτιοῦσιν αὐτὸν ποτήριον εἰς παράκλησιν ἐπὶ πατρὶ καὶ μητρὶ αὐτοῦ. In several places, a derived word refers to "pieces of bread" (i.e. Ps.102:9).
Apr
21
comment What does “break bread” mean in Acts 20:7 and 11?
When this Greek combination of "break" (κλάω) and "bread" (ἄρτος) is used it appears to me in a brief perusal of each case to imply the "sharing of a meal", with perhaps the emphasis on the division of the meal (to be shared by many), coming with the use of "break" which appears in some use in the LXX to translate "shattering" (i.e., of one's enemies). Perhaps other lit. would indicate if this is an idiomatic phrase, or relating to meetings of associations. However, the plain alternative would be to use the verb "to eat" "bread", which has less emphasis on the event of a special shared meal.
Apr
18
comment Is there any significance behind Jesus' use of the word “love” in “John 21:15-17”
D.A. Carson's short book on Exegetical Fallacies provides a specific answer to this question. He illustrates a fallacy which is committed when too much emphasis is placed on the difference in verbs used in this passage. I refer to that book for this answer, but I think @swaschek has also provided a very good answer below.
Apr
17
comment To what extent is Psalm 51:4 poetic exaggeration?
I enjoyed your question. God's response to David surely has both representative (corporate) and individual implications, theologically speaking; but my answer does not (intentionally) address that. Maybe this comment answers yours(?).
Apr
10
awarded  Self-Learner
Apr
9
revised Those who believe are “especially” saved?
clarified greek expl. is good no matter the interp.
Apr
9
revised Those who believe are “especially” saved?
edit to aviod contribution to debate
Apr
9
answered Those who believe are “especially” saved?
Apr
9
awarded  Quorum
Apr
9
revised To what extent is Psalm 51:4 poetic exaggeration?
plural ending, word choice
Apr
9
revised To what extent is Psalm 51:4 poetic exaggeration?
grammer and spelling
Apr
9
revised To what extent is Psalm 51:4 poetic exaggeration?
organizing even more
Apr
9
revised To what extent is Psalm 51:4 poetic exaggeration?
fixed a word order
Apr
9
revised To what extent is Psalm 51:4 poetic exaggeration?
trying to clarify
Apr
8
revised To what extent is Psalm 51:4 poetic exaggeration?
added 43 characters in body
Apr
8
answered To what extent is Psalm 51:4 poetic exaggeration?
Apr
8
comment To what degree is understanding the feelings of a biblical author necessary in exegesis?
@Mike. Clarification. There's no misunderstanding of the WCF in my comment: I stated that "If the question is about...God's emotions...in exegesis, then that would involve the the attributes of God; and...'God is without passions'." Thereby, I simply indicate that if the degree of God's emotions is in the question, the doctrine of impassibiliy pertains to the answer - as does anthropopathism. Your quote proves that relevance. Additionally, how we should attribute emotions to God, has been raised in some notable Presbyterian debates (as the ordination exam of Dr. Gordon Clark).
Apr
7
comment To what degree is understanding the feelings of a biblical author necessary in exegesis?
I believe God used human authors, and when human emotions are applied to God I understand it as "anthropopathism". If the question is about learning how much God's emotions should be weighed in exegesis, then that would involve the the attributes of God; and in the protestant reformed confessions (that's what I'm most familiar with), the statement comes up "God is without passions" (i.e., Westminster Confession of Faith 2.1). However, if you are looking for the hermeneutical term, my favorite is a "Biblical-Historical" method leading to a communicative hermeneutic of encounter -knowing God.
Apr
6
answered To what degree is understanding the feelings of a biblical author necessary in exegesis?
Apr
5
comment Where can I find Greek and Hebrew plain text sources?
Jackpot, I didn't even see the select Box...great!