646 reputation
114
bio website stackoverflow.com/users/…
location Pacific Northwest, USA
age 94
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen Jul 18 at 20:52

Web developer; regular reader of biblical languages (Hebrew and Greek); an aspirant to both professional and exegetical disciplines.


Jun
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
28
awarded  Yearling
Jul
11
answered What is the difference between בְּתוֹךְ (b'tokh) and בְּקֶרֶב (b'kerev), which are both sometimes translated the same way?
Jul
10
answered What does it mean for a man to leave his father and mother?
Jun
19
awarded  Tumbleweed
Jun
12
accepted Why does Numbers 29:39 (LXX) refer to “your salvation” instead of “peace offerings”?
Jun
12
comment Why does Numbers 29:39 (LXX) refer to “your salvation” instead of “peace offerings”?
This answer is a start on thinking about the larger question of why the LXX word choice in translating shelem. Perhaps you could open the issue in a new question. It would be too long for me to answer, so I won't raise that question. If it's too long for me to answer, I won't ask it here. But it might not be too long of an exploration for you to explore on this site. Regards.
Jun
12
comment Why does Numbers 29:39 (LXX) refer to “your salvation” instead of “peace offerings”?
Interesting observations on Gen. 26. This answer fits well with the larger discussion of LXX usage of soteriou vs. eirenikos for shelem. Does the covenant distinction you make here, with respect to the ways of translating "peace offerings" hold up throughout the historical books? Maybe beyond what you have time to look at, but may be interesting. Thanks.
Jun
12
comment Why does Numbers 29:39 (LXX) refer to “your salvation” instead of “peace offerings”?
The intention in posting this question was based on a false assumption of an anomaly. I had not parsed a word (soteria) correctly, therefore looked it up incorrectly and thought I had found an anomoly! So I will accept my answer below that corrects my oversight. However, this question also begs the question of the translation choice of soteriou for shelem and I appreciate that a few more lines of answers have added depth to the question I would have been asking, had I understood my first question! If that makes sense.
Jun
12
comment Why does Numbers 29:39 (LXX) refer to “your salvation” instead of “peace offerings”?
Richard Averbeck in NIDOTTE, s.v. "shelem", states that it has been taken to mean "a sacrifice that brings salvation" (cf. the same in EDNT), but Averbeck suggests the possibility of reading "a sacrifice that celebrates salvation". He also notes that in 1 Sam. - 2kgs eirenikos is used, instead of soteriou (i.e.1 Sam.11:15). Soteriou, being used in Leviticus and here in Numbers. This still does not answer why, or in what manner the translation choice was made. That is a good question. Perhaps the answers posted here are a start on that question, and could be followed up with further study.
Jun
12
revised Why does Numbers 29:39 (LXX) refer to “your salvation” instead of “peace offerings”?
removed a line which was theologically misleading for readers, and therefore unnecessary
Jun
11
comment Why does Numbers 29:39 (LXX) refer to “your salvation” instead of “peace offerings”?
Note: soteria in Num. 29:39 is the adjective, not the noun. I edited this answer to correct that remaining false assumption.
Jun
11
revised Why does Numbers 29:39 (LXX) refer to “your salvation” instead of “peace offerings”?
deleted 97 characters in body
Jun
11
comment Why does Numbers 29:39 (LXX) refer to “your salvation” instead of “peace offerings”?
Thanks for your answer here Tim, but I think we both missed it. I've explained more in my answer below.
Jun
11
answered Why does Numbers 29:39 (LXX) refer to “your salvation” instead of “peace offerings”?
Jun
10
asked Why does Numbers 29:39 (LXX) refer to “your salvation” instead of “peace offerings”?
May
17
awarded  Critic
May
4
awarded  Custodian
May
4
reviewed No Action Needed Why does Mark provide two feeding accounts?
May
4
revised What is the significance of the phrase πιστὸς ὁ λόγος (“the faithful saying”) in Pauline epistles?
JH Bernard, not Findley