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Jul
6
comment How to understand Leviticus 18:22 and 20:13
@mbm29414 Our sages taught (Sanhedrin 105a) that the righteous of all nations shall have a place in the world to come. The balance of the scale seems to favor the Noachide because he has only 7 commandments to follow, and the Jew has up to 613 commandments (not all of which apply to any individual Jew). However, because Jews have more commandments, they have more opportunities to achieve higher levels of holiness. But since we do not know how God weighs any one commandment, we assume that our good and bad deeds are even and our next good or bad choice could decide our final judgment.
Jul
6
revised How to understand Leviticus 18:22 and 20:13
Amended to bring in insights following the Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriages.
Jul
6
comment How to understand Leviticus 18:22 and 20:13
@mbm29414 No, I am not Christian; I converted to Orthodox Judaism 35 years ago. Jewish law says non-Jews are only required to observe seven commandments that were given to Noah. Our tradition teaches that these laws were: 1) Do not Blasphemy; 2) Establish courts of Law; 3) Do not commit Incest; 4) Do not commit Bloodshed; 5) Do not commit Robber; 6) Do not commit Idolatry; and 7) Do not eat Treifus (Heb. for non-kosher; more correctly, "do not eat parts of animals while they are still alive"). To remember this, my wife created an acronym: "B'li Brit," Hebrew for "Without the Covenant."
Jun
24
comment When were the superscripts added to the Psalms?
If you are referring to such things as "A Psalm of David", Judaism treats these as part of the Psalm itself, which is why our verse numbering often differs from Christian Bibles. To know, for example, whether the Psalm was written by the sons of Korach or King David, for example, is pretty important to appreciating the text. For example, Ps. 3 says that it is a psalm of David when he fled from Absalom, his son. That is very important because it is a psalm praising G-d. David understood that when extraordinary things happened to him, good or bad, it was because G-d was communicating something.
Apr
9
comment How would stoning of an adulterer actually be carried out under the Law of Moses?
The four methods of execution are not buried at all. The rabbis (aka the Pharisees) preserved the details of practices in the Second Temple in the Mishna, and they are discussed at length (a great deal of length) by later generations of the rabbis in the Gemara (together the Gemara and Mishna are published in what we know today as the "Talmud." None of the executions were what you commonly expect. I'll write an answer.
Apr
9
reviewed Leave Open What is the new covenant made with Jews/Israel in Jeremiah 31:31
Apr
1
reviewed Leave Open Plants created before the sun?
Mar
30
comment Why is the genealogy in Luke attributed to Mary?
Kevin, can you give us some examples of people who contend that Luke is referencing Mary's genealogy?
Mar
25
comment Why is the genealogy in Luke attributed to Mary?
If it were Mary's genealogy, and it is important (and it is), then why didn't the NT explicitly tell you that it was her genealogy? Yes, there is a big problem.
Mar
25
comment Why is the genealogy in Luke attributed to Mary?
What Biblical proof is there that Mary was descended from David? Also I can't agree that a child born out of wedlock would not be considered appropriate to be Messiah, necessarily. After all, David was descended from Ruth who was a Moabitess. Had Mary had an adulterous relationship, i.e. got pregnant after she was engaged to marry someone other than the father, then yes, there would be a problem because the child would then be a mamzer. But if Joseph and Mary just jumped the gun, then no problem. A famous rabbi back then was born out of wedlock. We don't blame the child for that.
Mar
25
comment Why is the genealogy in Luke attributed to Mary?
@user6053 (cont. last comment) Under Jewish law (then and now), an adopted father does not replace the biological father. E.g. If Adam's parents were Yosef and Miriam, but Miriam's husband Shmuel adopted Adam, Adam would still be named Adam son of Yosef. If Adam's father was unknown or not Jewish he would be known as the Adam son of Miriam. If Yosef wasn't Jewish at the time of birth, but converted afterward, Adam would still be Adam son of Miriam. That was the case of one of the rabbis in the Talmud whose father converted after his birth (and later became a great scholar also).
Mar
25
comment Why is the genealogy in Luke attributed to Mary?
@user6053 (cont.) The theories that Mary was descended from David, or that adoption by Joseph conferred Joseph's tribal status to Jesus, are not found in the Bible -- in fact, they are contrary to Jewish law found in the Bible and Rabbinic teachings from that time. (more)
Mar
25
comment Why is the genealogy in Luke attributed to Mary?
@user6053 Correct.The Messiah must be a descendant of David and a member of the tribe of Judah. Tribal lineage is determined by the father (Num. 1:18, 2:2, 36:7). By giving us the patrilineal line for Joseph, the NT attempts to prove Jesus was a patrilineal descendant of David. Paul acknowledges this view. Rom. 1:3; Heb. 7:14. But as soon as the NT gives Joseph's genealogy, it abandons the proof by saying Joseph did not father Jesus. Matt. 1:18. This switch suggests in interpolation of the Gospels by those Church leaders who wanted to deify Jesus more than provide his creds as Messiah. (more)
Mar
25
awarded  Mortarboard
Mar
24
reviewed Reopen Why is the Greek word Θεὸς in John 1:1c treated as a proper noun in English Translation?
Mar
23
comment Does the past tense in the suffering servant song (Isaiah 53) refer to Jesus?
Does the Radak specifically apply this analysis to Isaiah 53?
Mar
23
comment Does the past tense in the suffering servant song (Isaiah 53) refer to Jesus?
@JoshuaBigbee Remember that the paragraph numbering came long after Isaiah wrote the book, placed there by Stephen Langston, the Archbishop of Cantebury, in the early 13th century -- about 2000 years after Isaiah. His decisions where to break up the book do not necessarily have any meaning, and often are contrary to the way the text was written (he often made a chapter break in the middle of a block of text -- as it appeared in the scroll -- rather than at the end of the block.