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Jun
30
comment Is Jesus giving the Spirit in John 20:22?
I don't know how to make it clearer. I enumerated them:The Spirit of God, The Spirit of Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit. You can find all three used in the NT. They are just another expression of the Trinity.
Jun
30
comment The Eye of the Needle
@Jas thanks for the input, I spelled it out more clearly.
Jun
30
comment Is Jesus giving the Spirit in John 20:22?
"The Spirit of the Holy Spirit " where do you get that?
Jun
30
comment Was Greek Mark's second language?
OK, if we assume that they gospels were written thirty to sixty years after Christ. AND it takes the average seminary student two years to think himself competent, then even "uneducated" Peter had the chance to go to seminary fifteen to thirty times to get the language down before he wrote anything. It is a bit absurd to claim that even Peter couldn't have written in fluent Greek.
Jun
30
comment Why did the tabernacle use the colors blue, purple and scarlet?
It is more important to me that SP is not seen as free-for-all allegory, but there is a formal method for interpreting, and a formal method for evaluating the interpretation. There is no other method of interpretation as rigorous.
Jun
30
comment Why did the tabernacle use the colors blue, purple and scarlet?
The altar is also made of wood/Man covered with brass/sin covered by the blood of the lamb and burnt up in tribute to His total devotion. We could also say that judge, but it has to be the same thing everywhere it occurs. And the purpose of the riddles is to draw us into meditation upon his word. It sure does that!
Jun
30
comment Why did the tabernacle use the colors blue, purple and scarlet?
In the same 3+1 relationship, the prophet is the summation of the prophecies contained in the voices of priest, king and judge, and the judge is the executor of the judgements found in the voices of the other three. So separating them is a subtle endeavor. I've given myself a 30% on the surety at this point, so any other insights are welcome.
Jun
30
comment Why did the tabernacle use the colors blue, purple and scarlet?
In SP we don't pit one opinion against another, we bring scripture to bear upon it. Yes. the altar has a relationship to the priest, but the priest speaks of esoteric things in a hidden language. The altar is his voice to the earthly. The prophet speaks of the earthly in the hidden voice.
Jun
30
comment Why did the tabernacle use the colors blue, purple and scarlet?
The altar has four horns... The four voices... that is the Word, or Prophet. The rest is covered with the sovereign will of the King who executes righteousness. You can't judge one system by the result obtained in another. What would be the basis of your judgement?
Jun
30
comment What is the meaning of “rod and staff” (Psalm 23)?
Now that the goats are older and can defend themselves against single dogs, and since they come to me when I want them, I carry a dog dazer, a pocket of shredded wheat and a .48 ;-)
Jun
30
comment What is the meaning of “rod and staff” (Psalm 23)?
I have goats. When they were young I carried a rod and a staff. The rod was to defend the goats against dogs. Though the curved staff was as long, it was not as strong having been bent into a curve. The curve would break easily if used as a weapon. I carried the staff so I could draw the goats to me.
Jun
19
comment Does the story of the thief on the cross imply that Jesus believed religious practice was unnecessary for salvation?
Symbolically, his feet were nailed to a cross, so he was unable to work in the flesh or in the spirit. However, he did what we are called to do: "You are my witnesses." His 'work' which validated his claim was to proclaim Christ. So when we 'work' in faith, they are not works, but acts which acknowledge God as God.
Jun
17
comment In Dispensationalism what rule determines applicability of a scriptural demand?
Here is an illustrative example: In covenant theology, the symbols of the first covenant are replaced with new covenant symbols, while retaining the meaning of the first. In dispensationalism new symbols are created with new meaning. Covenant churches baptize infants rather than circumcise. Baptism is done by sprinkling retaining the meaning of the blood being sprinkled on the whole congregation. Dispensational churches baptize by immersion based on a literal application of the symbols in the NT. Are these accidental distinctions or guided by a hermeneutic?
Jun
17
comment In Dispensationalism what rule determines applicability of a scriptural demand?
The line effects how we view Israel and the church. Are they one entity, two, or blended, and if blended, does the blended entity get separated? Going back to the OP, it directly effects the applicability of law to the current believer. So I am digging to find (and I appreciate your feedback greatly) between the dispensationalist schemes of 8,7,4,and 3 dispensations. What difference does it make upon exegesis? And if it doesn't, then why have the scheme? They are frameworks for interpretation, what difference does it make in determining application for daily life?
Jun
17
comment In Dispensationalism what rule determines applicability of a scriptural demand?
One alternative to dispensationalism is Covenant theology, which is what Luther subscribed to. When he refers to dispensations it is the Old and New Covenants, so I think we are getting lost in the words when we call those who identify two covenants dispensationalist. Covenant theology identifies two covenants but sees grace and law in both, whereas dispensationalism, in all forms draws a firm line at the cross between a dispensation of law, and one of grace.
Jun
17
comment In Dispensationalism what rule determines applicability of a scriptural demand?
Why doesn't a Dispensationalist observe the feasts? Some worship on the Sabbath others do not. So I am not sure I understand yet, what is the guiding principle.
Jun
17
comment Humankind divided up among the gods?
Rashi - according to the number of the children of Israel: [God let man remain in existence] for the sake of a [small] number of the children of Israel who were destined to descend from the children of Shem, and [the sake of] the number of the seventy souls of the children of Israel who went down to Egypt, He “set up the boundaries of peoples,” [i.e., He separated man into seventy nations with] seventy languages.
Jun
16
comment In Dispensationalism what rule determines applicability of a scriptural demand?
Would you say that allegory leads to minimizing the effect of commands, or that the desire to minimize the effect of commands leads one to allegorize. And which ever way you say it, do you believe it to be a general rule, or just an observation of the groups you have observed?
Jun
16
comment In Dispensationalism what rule determines applicability of a scriptural demand?
Great start! Dispensationalism concerns more than just Revelation. The OT is divided into varying numbers of dispensations. Do you see that these divisions permit ignoring application of certain requirements since that dispensation has past? Or that a requirement in one dispensation is likewise made to be allegory of a slightly different requirement in the next?
Jun
15
comment Where is God coming from in Habakkuk 3:3, and what does that signify?
Teman means 'South' or 'right" since south is to the right when looking east. This double meaning allows for a reversal of metaphor. South represents the earthly but right represents spiritual. We must be careful how we divide it. In a 'spiritual' shadow of Christ, he came from the spirit (right). This is validated by Mt. Paran which is a mountain of caverns (tombs) with a root of 'beautiful'. The mixup is understandable: the sheep are on God's right which is north looking from the east.