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I am in my senior term at the Seminary of the Wilderness. My first ten years were spent as bi-vocational pastor/evangelist in Utah preaching of Christ how I knew best and trying to improve by learning theology from Reformed, Wesleyan, Pentecostal, Baptist and other sources. The second ten years were spent as a BVP/E and discovering that I didn't know what I thought I knew and reading the Bible without outside influence. At the beginning of the third ten I started seeing Christ in the OT, and tried to figure out how and why. I intend in the fourth ten to figure out how to communicate what I learned last term. After that I might be useful for something.

My bias in approaching the Bible is that I believe that it exists in a form today sufficiently intact to be considered infallible. That apparent contradictions are intentional riddles designed to guide us in focusing on different aspects of Christ. That sensus plenior exists in a form which is discernible in a verifiable, and reproducible manner. And that God is a rewarder of those who diligently seek him.


Jul
8
comment The number two in the book of Zechariah
You have been in Zech a while. If you would like to see the whole book unpacked, drop me a note and I'll start working on it. I'd have to do it through e-mail because I don't know what format it would take here.
Jul
8
comment The number two in the book of Zechariah
Just a note.. 7 is the number of completeness in SP. There are six spatial rays of direction, and a seventh in time (you cannot go back in time). 4 is the whole word of God as revealed through prophet, priest, king and judge. These are duals of duals (HH, HE, EH, EE) The duality of time is between time/eternity. As for rhetorical emphasis, tere is a Jewsih rule that says a double letter is not a new root, but an expansion (of some sort) of the root with a single letter. Using this rule it is determined that Cain had a twin sister and Abel had two twin sisters (triplets)
Jul
8
comment The number two in the book of Zechariah
@Kazark Try applying it everywhere you see it. If it only works here it is just free-for-all allegory with a coincidental application. If it works everywhere, it is God's intended meaning.
Jul
7
comment What is “the hermeneutical circle”?
If a hermeneutical principle is not derived from the scriptures, then it is by definition man-made. No wonder we have free-for-all hermeneutics ;-)
Jul
7
comment What is “the hermeneutical circle”?
Hmmm... I seem to remember that a programming language wasn't considered a real language if it's own compiler couldn't be written in it. So why would asking for hermeneutical principles derived from the scriptures be any different?
Jul
7
comment Was Adam created as complete man containing both male and female?
@monica THere's a name for the structural pattern in Hebrew ABA. Where the references at the beginning are repeated at the end. But I can't remember what it is.
Jul
7
comment Why was a chapter division placed at the end of Genesis 1, rather than between 2:3 and 2:4?
A few more chapters like this and it might be considered evidence that Langton saw sensus plenior.
Jul
7
comment Does the Gospel of Thomas help in reproducing the hermeneutical methods of the apostles?
Also look how they treat John the B. Mark plainly states that John fulfills prophecy by coming before Jesus. Matthew adds the SP images of the vipers and the axe. Luke includes the birth of John and the sign of his father "no water/word" until John. And John includes the imagery of the firmament of Gen 1. Each a bit more sophisticated that n the previous authors.
Jul
7
comment Does the Gospel of Thomas help in reproducing the hermeneutical methods of the apostles?
I am very skeptical about Q. ;-) Under the assumptions of SP, the disciples were taught how to read the Bible by Jesus, not given omniscient knowledge of it. So each successive book, in the order above, shows a more in depth knowledge of the SP in the OT. Just look at where each author begins the story. Mark with John's preaching, Matthew with Abraham. Luke with Adam. John with Gen 1:1. As they each had more time than the previous author to practice reading as Jesus taught, they make a deeper application of OT scripture.
Jul
6
comment Does the Gospel of Thomas help in reproducing the hermeneutical methods of the apostles?
"But I would want to know if there's any connection between the Gospel of Thomas and the apostles." I would suggest taht many people had access to the apostles, and that GOT was produce FROM their teaching, not the other way around.
Jul
6
comment Does the Gospel of Thomas help in reproducing the hermeneutical methods of the apostles?
Some GOT researchers place an early date on GOT even preceding the gospels. If the gospels are the recorded "dog and pony show" (not meant derogatorily, but based on the repetion of the apostles, preaching the same thing in many places) then a contemporaneous origin is not out of the question. They would be sermon notes on how to read the OT. and the gospels would be the events that Jesus did that fulfilled the OT. This can be shown if the gospels are analyzed as if written in the order Mark, Matt, Luke John, each becoming more sophisticated in the use of SP.
Jul
6
comment Does the Gospel of Thomas help in reproducing the hermeneutical methods of the apostles?
THe GOT has been labelled as Gnostic by those who attempt to understand it literally. Philo is more tunes to Pythogreans, and Greek Philosophy. His use of numerology is completely different. Scholors say that it is likely he did not read Hebrew, without which there can be little tie to the gospels. I have shown that even the Logos is traceable to Gen 1:1 rather than to Philo.
Jul
6
comment How does the rule of non-contradiction differ between Greek logic and Biblical Hermeneutics?
There is a bad hermeneutic rule that says an author uses the same word in the same way... this is obviously not true, in the examples you give.
Jul
6
comment How does the rule of non-contradiction differ between Greek logic and Biblical Hermeneutics?
Great answer. I wanted to get it established as an answer so we can refer to it in answers to skeptics, who accept the contradiction at face value rather than look for the difference in time or way the language is used.
Jul
6
comment Why should an altar be made with uncut stone?
The law is an aspect of Holiness. The Kingdom will be a Holy kingdom as will the church. "Be ye therefore Holy". There is one stone that was broken by the rod of God, from which came living water.
Jul
6
comment According to Scripture, how should we interpret Scripture?
@Jas hermeneutics.stackexchange.com/questions/460/…
Jul
6
comment Why isn't there a taxonomic distinction between clean and unclean birds?
@Jon, your instincts fit SP. The picture is that those birds eat either carrion, dead things, or they catch fish, which, like the lobster catching fish is not kosher (snatching those living in the world and dragging them to the earth)( And birds that eat other birds). The birds that are clean are those that eat seed (Christ) as a picture of the Eucharist.
Jul
6
comment “Back in ships to Egypt” in Deut. 28
Drop the vowels, Ships also means sorrow, and they have the root 'I'. So he is saying, "Though at times you wished to return to Egypt, in this case I myself will take you back to Egypt in sorrow."
Jul
5
comment According to Scripture, how should we interpret Scripture?
"recognizing the gradual unfolding of the redemption plan in it." this is an apriori assumption. I have shown that John Got John 1-1-4 from Gen 1.1 and that plausibly, by the meaning of the words themselves, Adam knew the skins were a symbol of the death of the creator Lamb of God.
Jul
5
comment According to Scripture, how should we interpret Scripture?
I would argue that Paul did not appeal to "bare nature" but in fact was making the point that "the natural man says long hair is a shame" and knowing that for the Nazarite it was his holiness (the spiritual interpretation) produced a riddle which must be answered. Christ bore our shame on the cross (symbolized by long hair), but it was not his shame, he was holy.