815 reputation
136
bio website bullartistry.com.au/wp
location
age
visits member for 1 year, 2 months
seen 11 mins ago

Mike Bull is a graphic designer who lives in the Blue Mountains west of Sydney Australia. He has written some books on the fractal nature of the literary structure of the Bible: http://www.amazon.com/Bible-Matrix-Michael-Bull/dp/1449702635 http://www.amazon.com/Bible-Matrix-II-The-Covenant/dp/1449723756 http://www.amazon.com/Gods-Kitchen-Theology-you-drink/dp/1449779409 His favorite theologians are James B. Jordan and Peter Leithart. Blog: http://www.bullartistry.com.au/wp


Mar
28
comment What is the “systematic typology” hermeneutic method and how does it work?
Some points might require more explanation (such as Booths being a feast for Jews and Gentiles) but this structure is found everywhere, even in the Last Supper. Notice the chiastic correspondence between Day 2's robe and Day 6's torn veil. I believe the entire Bible consists of 4 testaments. What is known as the new testament should not be considered separate. Not only do we see this pattern the first century history (Jesus = Passover; AD70 = Atonement), but the entire Bible history combined follows the pattern. If the New Testament is separate the largest structure is incomplete.
Mar
28
comment What is the “systematic typology” hermeneutic method and how does it work?
@MonicaCellio Day 1: Light-Joseph the favoured son (Initiation - Sacrifice chosen/Sabbath) Day 2: Firmament-Joseph robed (Delegation - Sacrifice cut/Passover) Day 3: Land & Fruits-Joseph's first dream (Elevation - Sacrifice lifted up & presented/Firstfruits) Day 4: Governing Lights/Joseph's second dream (Purification-Holy fire/Pentecost) Day 5: Swarms/Clouds-Joseph's brothers unite against him (Transformation-Fragrant smoke/Trumpets) Day 6: Animals & Man/Joseph's robe is bloodied (Vindication-Mediators/Atonement) Day 7: Rest-Joseph is sold to Gentiles (Representation/Booths)
Mar
28
comment What is the “systematic typology” hermeneutic method and how does it work?
@MonicaCellio Thanks Monica - good question. The basic patterns are found in the text as mentioned: the Creation Week, the Feasts, the Tabernacle, the Covenant speeches, the sacrificial procedure, the journey from Egypt to Canaan, etc. The patterns run right through the Bible, and are entirely self-referential, for instance, in the first cycle of the story of Joseph:
Mar
27
comment God's speech in Job 38-42
Good answer. The maidens may not be a reference to Job's daughters. Some believe he was an Edomite king (Jobab), in which case these would be servants in his court. biblicalhorizons.com/biblical-horizons/130
Mar
26
answered What is the “systematic typology” hermeneutic method and how does it work?
Mar
25
answered Is there external historic or scientific evidence of a particular flood that corresponds to the Genesis 7 account?
Mar
21
comment Jesus and the adulterous woman: was stoning a practical possiblity?
Fraser, the literary structure of John requires this passage to be included. It is more likely it was left out by well-meaning Christians who thought it might encourage people to commit adultery. The structure of the passage itself is a replay, or rather, a re-match, of the events in the Garden of Eden. In this case, Adam steps in to rescue the bride.
Mar
21
awarded  Critic
Mar
20
comment What is the meaning of “calculate” in Revelation 13:18?
Thanks Jon. Much appreciated.
Mar
20
answered What is the meaning of “calculate” in Revelation 13:18?
Mar
17
comment Before the Tower of Babel did all speak Hebrew as the original human language?
Sure - if we believe Genesis is history, rather than myth, it makes sense that it was written by those who lived it. Importantly, all the names recorded before Babel have meanings in Hebrew. If we take that as our foundation, there are some other less obvious factors to consider. The literary structures of the text before Babel continue in the text after Babel. Also, Edward Ullendorff argued in his "Is Biblical Hebrew a Language?" that the language of the text is too restricted in form and variety to function as a spoken language, that it is instead a technical, scribal, priestly dialect.
Mar
16
answered What is the meaning of “poor in spirit” in Matthew 5:3
Mar
14
awarded  Enthusiast
Mar
13
answered Why is the Bible so repetitive?
Mar
12
comment How Is the Date of Composition of the Gospels Estimated?
The saints sealed (as mini scrolls) in Rev 7 are slain and resurrected, and then put into government. So the apostolic church must be defined as a transitional body which ended with the Temple. This would support the idea that the giving of the canon by the Spirit was part of that initial, and now finished, generation. It also makes sense of the end of the apostolic gifts, which were a sign to Israel.
Mar
12
comment How Is the Date of Composition of the Gospels Estimated?
Thanks Jon. I think it would boil down to what one thinks is going on in the Revelation. Jordan sees it as a rundown of events from Acts to AD70, with a brief glimpse of the current age in Rev 20. Jesus ascends as Firstfruits Lamb (AD30) and opens the NC scroll. The seals broken are the apostolic witness, and the promise of vengeance for all the innocent blood from Abel. The final seal is actually the day of Pentecost. War between false and true Jews (Christians) ensues. The Trumpets are the final apostolic warnings, and the bowls are the destruction of the old order (seven sprinklings).
Mar
12
answered How Is the Date of Composition of the Gospels Estimated?
Mar
11
revised What is “apocalyptic” literature?
Expanded
Mar
11
comment What does Jesus mean by generation when talking about the end times?
The simplest answer is the one found by doing an online word search for "generation" in the New Testament. Do this and I promise you will be blown away. It it most certainly first century.
Mar
10
comment Should Q be considered a Gospel?
The Bible doesn't really deal in hard and fast genres. There is too much overlap (historical narrative written as poetry etc.) so that is largely an imposed idea. The four gospels correspond to the four faces of the cherubim, which in turn correspond to the four points of the compass in the tabernacle furnitures (Lion - Ark, Ox - Altar, Man - Table, Eagle - Lampstand), which give us priest, king, prophet and mediator. Four eye-witness testimonies is thus sacred architecture. Any speculation concerning an imposed genre and whether it might apply to other texts misses the point entirely.