5,260 reputation
52169
bio website na
location Kansas City, MO
age 38
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Aug 25 at 12:44

 


Nov
9
comment What is the head covering referring to in 1 Corinthians 11:4-6?
Those articles are excellent. Also, thanks for the work that went into this one.
Nov
9
comment Can we use “linguistic fingerprints” to identify different authors of the Bible?
Welcome to BiblicalHermeneutics.SE!
Nov
9
comment What is “Regula Fidei”?
@Caleb Yeah, I agree. I need to come back and rehash this to include the contrast to the GH approach. (It's a big topic and I was tired of typing.) ;)
Nov
9
comment What is “Regula Fidei”?
Sorry for the partial answer. This doesn't really approach the subject of the GH appraoch to hermeneutics.
Nov
9
comment What is the meaning behind the parable of Children in the Marketplace in Luke 7:31-35?
Excellent question! And welcome to BiblicalHermeneutics.SE!
Nov
9
comment What does Jesus mean in Matthew 26:64 with “You have said so”?
@lonesomeday Well, I guess that explains your viewpoint nicely, then. Thanks for the input.
Nov
9
comment What does Jesus mean in Matthew 26:64 with “You have said so”?
@lonesomeday Two authors, two views of the same event, one man speaking. That tells me that we can look at the four accounts (in the four gospels) and use them to reconcile each other. Unless you think that all four accounts are recording different events or that all four accounts are made up.
Nov
9
comment What does Jesus mean in Matthew 26:64 with “You have said so”?
@lonesomeday No, you're right. You also have to read the text of Matthew itself to understand. "You have said it so" can mean many things, one of which is "What you said is true". We can infer from Mark that this is the correct interpretation. (Sorry, I skipped that logical step.)
Nov
8
comment What does Jesus mean in Matthew 26:64 with “You have said so”?
I don't know if that would be sarcasm, but I think that's the idea.
Nov
8
comment Is translation a subset of exegesis?
So are these three different views on the answer or are they three different aspects of the same answer? (ie what would your TL;DR say?)
Nov
8
comment Is translation a subset of exegesis?
May be related: What is the difference between exegesis and hermeneutics?
Nov
8
comment Does sensus plenior exist in the New Testament?
I would think that if you could apply Sensus Plenior to any part of the Bible, it would apply to the whole equally, and for the same reasons.
Nov
7
comment Does Daniel 12 imply the righteous will become stars?
In essence: They'll be in heaven.
Nov
6
comment What is the relationship between the “Adversary” in Job and the serpent in Genesis?
The variations of interpretations on this subject seem directly related to the doctrine through which it is interpreted.
Nov
6
comment What's the difference between “sensus plenior” and “inspired sensus plenior”?
I hope you answer this yourself, because you are the one I would go to for the answer!!
Nov
4
comment What is the relationship between the “Adversary” in Job and the serpent in Genesis?
OK, I'll trust you on that. From my viewpoint, you either oppose God or you are for God: it's a dichotomy. For or against; God or Satan. Granted, that's more of a Christian view rather than a spectrum of opposition.
Nov
4
comment What is the relationship between the “Adversary” in Job and the serpent in Genesis?
God is above all, we can all agree. Beyond that, there are two choices. (1) The multitude of entities that oppose God (Satan, fallen angels, and errant humans) are on equal terms and oppose God equally. (2) Satan is the primary, top-most entity that opposes God and all others that oppose God are doing the will of Satan. Because of John 8:44, I believe the latter. Believing the latter shows that all who oppose God are of Satan. Through this lens, we can see that the serpent and adversary are the same.
Nov
4
comment What is the relationship between the “Adversary” in Job and the serpent in Genesis?
@Soldarnal Tough call. I haven't really researched the idea of God deceiving before. However, I did find an excellent blog post about God deceiving. Also, here are verses that seem to indicate that God does deceive on occasion.
Nov
4
comment What is the relationship between the “Adversary” in Job and the serpent in Genesis?
From a theoretical standpoint, I agree with this. So, +1. However, looking at all this through my doctrine, I believe that they are one and the same. Otherwise, we would have to accept that there are multiple agents actively working against God. From a doctrinal stance, I believe that it's a dichotomy--God vs Satan. And while Satan has agents of his own, it's his initiative, control, and authority that these things are being done. These two instances specifically are Satan himself, in different forms.
Nov
4
comment What is the relationship between the “Adversary” in Job and the serpent in Genesis?
On a purely textual level, I agree. So, +1. However, here's one common thread: They opposed God. One (the serpent) opposed God back when all the humans were innocent. The other (the adversary) opposed God in heaven, where (presumably) there are no others opposed to God. There's a pretty common thread linking them.