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  • 11 votes cast
Apr
25
comment Why do English translations sometimes, but not always, transform names instead of just transliterating them?
Related: linguistics.stackexchange.com/questions/2299/…
Mar
22
comment What is the tree of life in Proverbs 11:30?
But see העמ״ד ברא׳ ב׳ ט׳.
Feb
13
comment What is the proper translation in English, for Pi Hahiroth.?
@H3br3wHamm3r81, it's a transliteration, to be sure. But it's the translation also, if you insist that the word has a translation; the alternative would be to say "don't translate names", which is certainly very reasonable. Either way works, really. Same for "Chicago".
Feb
12
comment What is the proper translation in English, for Pi Hahiroth.?
@H3br3wHamm3r81 "יונה" has two distinct translations (at least) corresponding to two referents of the word. One translation is "Jonah", a name; the other is "dove". In the book of Jonah is has the former translation; in Genesis, the latter. To say it translates as "dove" in the book of Jonah is an error. Likewise, to say "Chicago" (in the sentence "I went to Chicago Tuesday") translates into French as anything but "Chicagot", or "פִּי הַחִירֹת" (in Exodus) translates into English as anything but "Pi Hachiros", is an error. According to Rashi and ibn Ezra, anyway.
Feb
12
comment What is the proper translation in English, for Pi Hahiroth.?
@Bagpipes, "Jonah" is a man's name. It doesn't translate as (or mean) "Dove". Are you asking about etymology? The question says you're asking about translation.
Oct
31
comment What is the tree of life in Proverbs 11:30?
@JonEricson, the no-synonyms thing he's famous for refers to words, like כֶּבֶשׂ, keves, and כֶּשֶׂב, kesev, both of which mean "sheep", which he distinguishes between. I don't think it refers to different meanings (or referents) of the same word, like etz chayim ("tree of life") here.