2,818 reputation
11341
bio website brucealderman.info
location Kansas
age 45
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen yesterday

I've been a Christian since 1985, and a member of East Heights United Methodist Church in Wichita since 1994, though I no longer live in Wichita. My theology is Wesleyan/Arminian, but I don't think all Christians must share this view.

I believe that the Bible is inspired but not inerrant, that it was written to teach us about God and not the physical universe.

I believe faith is not an intellectual pursuit but a transformation of our entire being.


Feb
15
comment Is 1 Corinthians 14:33-35 an interpolation?
Also: 6. The verses were original to Paul's letter, but the copyist at Corinth accidentally omitted them, and then wrote them into the margin. The original was kept by the church, and only the copy with the words in the margin was circulated.
Feb
15
comment Is 1 Corinthians 14:33-35 an interpolation?
I can think of another possibility: 5. The verses were added, without Paul's knowledge, shortly after the letter was written. For example, maybe someone in the Corinth church added them to the margin of the original copy. Or maybe someone added them into the margin of the first copy made from the original letter, then the second copy was circulated while the church held onto the original.
Feb
15
comment Who was the Beloved Disciple?
I actually could vote this up if you would just mention Lazarus by name in your answer rather than making me download and read a 56-page .pdf to find out who you are talking about.
Feb
10
comment Is there a modern English translation of the Bible that uses the second-person plural pronoun?
This sounds kinda like the Cotton Patch Gospel.
Feb
9
comment Who was the Beloved Disciple?
It should be pointed out, though, that the first ones to attribute this gospel to John were people who knew him personally, and that the church community that put the New Testament together included this gospel only because it carried John's name and authority.
Feb
8
comment Was the Beloved Disciple the author of the Fourth Gospel?
I see a discrepancy between your statement that we should not trust in non-Biblical sources, and your claim that the answer can be found in an eBook.
Feb
8
comment Was the Beloved Disciple the author of the Fourth Gospel?
I'm not sure why they might have been swapped. The one source I've seen that defends it does not seem to care about that question; they seem more interested in attempting to reconstruct the "original" gospel of John. Other sources mention it only in passing.
Feb
7
comment Who was the Beloved Disciple?
Are you asking for the identity of the beloved disciple, or of the author of the gospel? They may not have been the same person.
Feb
2
comment Are Job's friends the voice of the Accuser?
@Jon: "I would like to play devil's advocate"...or in this case, devil's advocates' advocate. :-)
Feb
1
comment Separation of Luke-Acts
I'm not sure I understand the question. Could you elaborate?
Jan
31
comment What is the significance of '14 generations' in Matthew’s account of Jesus's genealogy?
In Hebrew, the values of the letters of David's name add up to 14.
Dec
16
comment How did the gospels get their names?
Is the Patmos tradition based solely on identifying the gospel writer with the author of Revelation?
Dec
16
comment How did the gospels get their names?
@LanceRoberts: That would be redundant. The same tradition gives us all four names.
Dec
16
comment Why didn't Joseph try to contact his father from Egypt?
Is there any way to answer this question apart from speculation?
Dec
14
comment Can we date Mark without first committing to an interpretation of the Olivet Discourse?
Many ancient people lived what we would consider a full lifespan. The second century martyr Polycarp claimed before he died that he had served Christ for 86 years. The Greek philosopher Socrates was 70 when he was sentenced to death.
Nov
19
comment How consistent were Augustine's hermeneutics?
+1 for "The literal sense is the meaning intended by the human authors at the time of writing" -- this can't be stressed enough, that ancient people did not understand "literal" the way moderns do.
Nov
11
comment Is there a scriptural warrant for the literal-historical approach?
@GalacticCowboy: I mentioned the parables to draw a parallel: Just as Jesus' verbal teaching has a deeper meaning for those who seek it, so do the Scriptures.
Nov
2
comment Who named the wrong priest in Mark 2:26?
@Jack: I do believe your views are reasoned and thought through; given your assumptions, you've reached reasonable conclusions. My objection is that because I start from different assumptions, I am being accused of claiming the Holy Spirit is incompetent.
Nov
1
comment Who named the wrong priest in Mark 2:26?
@Jack: And if you're trying to say that God chose the very words for the NT authors to write, you're going to have to explain a lot more than who was high priest. Mark didn't know Greek very well, and often used the wrong verb tenses; sometimes he even changed tenses in the middle of a sentence. This is glossed over in most modern translations, but you can see it in Young's literal translation. This is a problem if God literally brought "all things" to their remembrance, but not if the writers were responsible for their own words.
Nov
1
comment Who named the wrong priest in Mark 2:26?
@Jack: But if Jesus was speaking just to those in the room with him, it wouldn't include the writers of most of the books of the New Testament, including Mark. So John 14 wouldn't apply to Mark picking the wrong priest's name from memory.