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5

This prophecy concerns the problems encountered in rebuilding of the Temple in Jerusalem. It is closely connected with the story in Ezra 4. The wicked woman in the "eiphah" measure (bushel or barrel) represents one or more of the enemies of Israel, primarily the Samaritans and the Edomites, who harassed the builders after being excluded from the rebuilding ...


5

There's no indication in the Hebrew text of who the 'I' is, as the question is introduced by the infinitive "le'mor". However, while the emissaries are plural, the "people" are not, since they aren't in the Hebrew at all. Hebrew is normally a VSO language, so we know that the verb in the first sentence is a singular "sent", but whether Bethel sent ...


4

David Instone-Brewer posits that Matthew was following a rabbinic tradition that rejected the notion that synonymous (poetic) parallelism was intended in the Hebrew Bible: It is very unlikely that a well-read Jew would misunderstand parallelism. This type of poetic construction was still being used as late as Baruch and 4 Esdras. However, as I have ...


4

I use this verse and its context to teach a bad use of verses and context. If this verse is used for Jesus being slain on the cross then we would have to make an almost impossible connection between the false prophets and Jesus, something that seems to tie a knot in our hermeneutical stomach. It is so important to observe that the verse has a connection ...


4

Two reasons barrenness was undesirable In antiquity there were typically two reasons that barrenness was undesirable. The first, which isn't really an issue in this text had to do with the security of the future. Children were the ancient equivalent of a retirement plan since there were no pensions, social security, etc. Therefore, the only ones to care for ...


3

like the mourning of Hadadrimmon in the Valley of Megiddon: Hadadrimmon has no connection to the Valley of Megiddon. These are, rather, two cases of mourning. [The first is] like the mourning of Ahab the son of Omri, who was slain by Hadadrimmon the son of Tabrimmon in Ramoth Gilead, as it is stated (I Kings 22:36): “A cry passed through the ...


3

The Totality of Two Jon Ericson claimed in his answer that two may be a number of completeness. At first I found this surprising, but I begin to find myself persuaded; and because technical terms have a power of persuasion in themselves, I have called it binary completeness. One may think of two sides of a coin, or two people in a marriage, or any number of ...


3

From a Christian perspective prophets after the return from the Babylonian exile are often citing visions about the days of Messiah. However there is no evidence that ancient rabbinic sources understood Zechariah 5 as referring to the end times. Therefore, it seems purely a Christian view that equates this chapter to those times. Under that view, the woman ...


3

Wikipedia also notes one more "pair": Chapters 9 to 14 This section consists of two "oracles" or "burdens": The first oracle (ch. 9-11) gives an outline of the course of God's providential dealings with his people down to the time of the coming of the Messiah. The second oracle (ch. 12-14) points out the glories that await Israel in "the ...


3

These two mountains of brass are the backdrops of the scene of which the four chariots ‘come out’ from. The chariots themselves I take the arguably most commonly held view: the four winds represents angels directing the four monarchies that overturned the known world starting with the Babylonian, Persian, Greek and then the Roman empire. The question before ...


3

In the English the infinitive here serves as the content of a purpose clause. It's hard to extract temporal aspect from infinitives without context, which appears to indicate that Satan did not have this opportunity. לְשִׂטְנֹֽו in verse looks to be a Hiphil (purpose) stem of the sin-tet-nun root. The lamed prefix reinforces this since it indicates ...


2

Verse 11: ביּום ההוא  יגדל המספּד בירוּשלם  כמספּד הדדרמון  בבקעת מגדון In that day will become big the-lament in Jerusalem, like/as/akin-to haddadrimmon lament, in valley of megedon. ביּום ההוא In-day of the-that (i.e. in that day) יגדל המספּד will-grow-big/will-increase the-lament כמספּד הדדרמון like haddadrimmon lament בבקעת מגדון in-valley ...


2

In Zechariah 14:16 the prophet is probably not referring to conversion in the sense of becoming Israelites, (or Jews already at that time). In this passage as in other similar passages the idea is that the nations will recognize the God of Israel as the true God, the only one worthy of worship. Conversion as we think of it today is not required. The ...


2

Zechariah 1:6 reads: אַךְ דְּבָרַי וְחֻקַּי אֲשֶׁר צִוִּיתִי אֶת-עֲבָדַי הַנְּבִיאִים הֲלוֹא הִשִּׂיגוּ אֲבֹתֵיכֶם But my words and my statutes, which I commanded my servants the prophets, did they not overtake your fathers? So far the translation is without special problems. The language of "laws overtaking" someone is used in Deuteronomy 28:15. ...


2

Zechariah was a prophet to those who had begun to return from their exile in Babylon, which was the ‘judgment that overtook their fathers’, to whom the former prophets cried out. Prophets like Isaiah, Micah and Jeremiah specifically cried out against them before the exile, but all other post exilic prophets did as well. These prophets prophesied that Israel ...


2

Clearly this mourning was apocalyptic and referred to the national mourning the spiritual Jerusalem would engage in upon the birth of the church during Messianic days. Even ancient references in the Talmud interpret Zechariah 12:10,12 as applied to the Messiah (according to Alfred Edresheim the Jewish historian in his book, The Life and Times of Jesus the ...


2

The farmer is one who has disowned his former profession of speaking falsely in the name of the Lord (as the previous verses 4-5 make clear). Such an individual now knows his rightful work and applies himself to it with diligence (verse 5). If he has suffered beatings (e.g. for having spoken falsely in the past), then he sees this as a good and positive ...


2

It is important to look at this passage as a whole and to consider what is going on in it. Zechariah 12:10-14 “And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and pleas for mercy, so that, when they look on me, on him whom they have pierced, they shall mourn for him, as one mourns for an only child, and weep ...


2

A similar phrase occurs in Amos 4:11 where Yahveh says that Israel was "like a brand plucked from the burning" (כְּאוּד מֻצָּל מִשְּׂרֵפָה). "Burning" (שְׂרֵפָה) is evidently related to "fire" (אֵשׁ), since the former is produced by the latter (cp. Isa. 64:11). Gesenius (p. 20) wrote that the noun אוּד referred to "a wooden poker, so called from the fire ...


2

The bronze mountains represent the entrance or gateway to the presence of God and in particular are reminsicent of the two great bronze pillars of Solomon's temple. Context of the Canon Mountains Mountains are used often as symbols throughout the Hebrew Bible. Their use is not uniform, but there are identifiable symbolic themes. Mountains may represent ...


2

Admittedly this passage is very difficult, but there are some parallels in the gospels that we must compare with similar passages in the Hebrew Bible. In other words, our fundamental hermeneutic is to interpret Scripture with Scripture. First, when we find Jesus on the Mount of Olives, he is in the company of a crowd of people according to the gospel of ...


2

tl;dr The Hebrew is also ambiguous. In the Hebrew: ‏ (16) וְֽהוֹשִׁיעָ֞ם יְהוָ֧ה אֱלֹהֵיהֶ֛ם בַּיּ֥וֹם הַה֖וּא כְּצֹ֣אן עַמּ֑וֹ כִּ֚י אַבְנֵי־נֵ֔זֶר מִֽתְנוֹסְס֖וֹת עַל־אַדְמָתֽוֹ׃ (17) כִּ֥י מַה־טּוּב֖וֹ וּמַה־יָפְי֑וֹ דָּגָן֙ בַּֽחוּרִ֔ים וְתִיר֖וֹשׁ יְנוֹבֵ֥ב בְּתֻלֽוֹת׃ ‎ (Westminster Leningrad Codex) The words translated "How wonderful ...


1

The LXX has Χαναναία in Zechariah 14:21, with other forms of the same word found many times elsewhere in the Old Testament, and also once in the New, Matthew 15:22, where the KJV has the same word as the LXX (Strong's G5478). Looking further at the instances in the LXX (canonical books), it almost disappears after the book of Judges, where it appears in ...


1

Four Post-Exilic Texts There are four texts in the Hebrew scriptures that were written in close historical proximity: Ezra, Nehemiah, Haggai, and Zechariah 1-8. In their respective books, Ezra and Nehemiah are portrayed as significant leaders during the post-exilic period, especially regarding the efforts to build a new temple in Jerusalem. Likewise, Ezra ...


1

The apostle Peter observes that the Old Testament prophets spoke concerning the salvation and grace that are ours in Christ and the glory that is to follow (1 Peter 10-11). In the gospels, Jesus also informs a Samaritan woman (John 4:23) that worship is no longer restricted to any specific geographical location (e.g. Jerusalem and its temple) or to set ...


1

In regards to the Jebusites, this is probably a reference to how God told David to build an altar on the land of Araunah, a Jebusite. The Israelites had lived in Jerusalem for a while, but it wasn't until David that they conquered the central fortress, which became known as the City of David. That fortress was a Jebusite one. While most of the Jebusites ...


1

Two mountains would make me think first of Gerizim and Ebal, where the Levites pronounced the blessings and curses, respectively, of Torah upon the people of Israel. These were pronouncements of God's blessings if Israel and Israelites kept covenant, and cursing if they did not (Paul refers to this in Gal 3:10). I have not studied Zechariah in any depth, but ...


1

I have read several commentaries on this portion of scripture and see it causes a lot of confusion because the most probable meaning is that it is not associated with the first coming of Messiah but the second coming. Originally I may have fell into the 'destruction of Jerusalem' trap because Jesus spoke about the destruction of Jerusalem while sitting on ...


1

There is not a standard belief among various bible scholars about what this means, but I suppose in general it could be said to the agreement of most that the prophecy is referring to a remnant of the Philistines, which Ekron was a city of, who would become proselytes of Judaism as a result of the destruction that was to fall on them. Possibly this ...



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