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In Keil and Delitzsch's Commentary,(2 Kings 2) The request of Elisha is evidently based upon Deu 21:17, where בּ פּי־שׁנים denotes the double portion which the first-born received in (of) the father's inheritance, as R. Levi b. Gers., Seb. Mnst., Vatabl., Grot., and others have perceived, and as Hengstenberg (Beitrr. ii. p. 133f.) in our days ...


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This really depends on how you define "Genesis" Many scholars believe that Genesis was sourced from the Enuma Elish which in turn was sourced from the Eridu Genesis. If you consider these first drafts of Genesis, then the answer is Sumerian. The book of Genesis as we have it now is vastly different in terms of meaning and what it is trying to tell us, but ...


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Two very easy questions. Question one: the answer is Hebrew. Question 2: the word used in Gen. 1:26 is אָדָם (ʼādām, “man”); the word in 1:27 is הָאָדָם (hāʼādām “the man”).


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I've always understood it as the "manifestation of sin in the presence of the Law," but more specifically "the penalty of sin the the presence of the law." Here's how I've explained it in teaching this passage: If there were no speeding laws you could drive fast and recklessly — and although dangerous and potentially harmful, there's no "curse." But once ...


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Exodus 22:18 (note it is 22:17 in the Hebrew text) is one of those texts which may be especially susceptible to anachronistic treatments based on putative translations rather than relevant historical and linguistic evidence. First, then, the text: Masoretic text: :מְכַשֵּׁפָה לֹא תְחַיֶּה mĕkaššēpâ lōʾ tĕḥayyeh You shall not allow a mĕkaššēpâ to ...


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From Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers: Exodus 22:18 [cf. Deuteronomy 18:10-11] - Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live.—The word translated [by some Bible versions] “witch” . . . is the feminine singular [i.e., sorceress of that rendered by “sorcerers” in Exodus 7:11, and means “a mutterer of charms.” The use of the feminine form can only be ...


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My Hebrew is basic, but I do read Greek. Sarah refers to Abraham as her kurios in Genesis 18:12 in the Septuagint (the Greek Old Testament.) Yet she does not address him directly with that word in her commentary of 1 Peter, Karen Jobes (2005:205) notes that "This noun [kurios] is the only lexical connection between the story of Sarah and Peter’s claim.” ...



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