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Answer: Although both Faith and Hope are functions of the "Psyche," Hope carries with it an emotional sense of "Joyful Expectation;" whereas Faith carries with it a rational sense of Certain Expectation. Luke 23:8, NASB - Now when Herod saw Jesus, he was exceedingly glad; for he had desired for a long time to see Him, because he had heard many ...


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Speaking strictly from a Biblical perspective... The world has adopted the word 'faith' to speak of other things. Strictly speaking, from what follows, only a Christian can have 'faith'. Some people would have difference of opinion. The following is from a general Word of Faith background, stemming from a study of the words in Greek and the apparent ...


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It refers to the things that shine in the night sky that are not the "lesser light" (the moon). So, the Hebrew "stars" would also include the wandering stars that we refer to as planets, as well as the distant suns that we label as stars proper. To the Hebrew, they were all "stars".


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Is there anything else intrinsic to these passages or their context that would cause the writers to choose this form. Is there anything that ties these occurrences together? Intrinsic - belonging naturally; deep-rooted, deep-seated, existing in something as a permanent, essential, or characteristic attribute. In the Hebraic mindset a name is honor, ...


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'The messiah' actually referrer to the Word from heaven, (John 6:25-35 and Mat1:18-24) called 'Harum mila' in ancient Hebrew. The Yorubas of Nigeria in their traditional religion of Ifa (Ephod by Septuagint and Ifa or Afa in Hebrew) called the name Orunmila (Hor'mila/Harum mila).


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Of course, אֱלֹהִים ʾĕlōhîm has a much broader semantic range than YHWH, as implied by the way the question is framed. They are by no means synonymous. The entry in Brown-Driver-Briggs lists a number of references where ʾĕlōhîm is used of one who stands in God's place (as HALOT also has it): Some references are regularly cited together here, especially ...


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The Greek text of John 14:2 according to the Textus Receptus (Stephanus, 1611) states: ἐν τῇ οἰκίᾳ τοῦ πατρός μου μοναὶ πολλαί εἰσιν εἰ δὲ μή εἶπον ἂν ὑμῖν πορεύομαι ἑτοιμάσαι τόπον ὑμῖν The word in question is μοναὶ (monai). It is the nominative plural declension of the feminine-gender, root noun μονή (monē). The noun μονή and its various declensions ...


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From here it says that the Archaic definition of the word "mansion" was "an abode or dwelling place". The definition of the English word "mansion" has simply changed over time. This verse is therefore more accurately translated to modern readers in the NABRE translation as "mansion" here does not mean "a large estate" as the word would tend to indicate in ...


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Both translations are suitable! But they indicate the original Hebrew has a deeper meaning than can be conveyed in one sentence of English. The two main issues here is the meaning of the word "lack" and how to best translate that from the imperfective. The details: The first verse contains four Hebrew words, two phrases of two words each. The first says ...


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Rather than spend a month or two answering all of the questions laid out ἄνωθεν (wink), I'll add yet another perspective that neither authority nor time seem to be the dominant categories according to LSJ, but instead: spatial position (as when the "veil of the shrine was split from above unto below" in Mt 27:51), which may include heaven above earth, and ...



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