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The ancient Egyptian equivalent of the Hebrew תּוֹעֵבָה (tôʿēbâ) is bawut: Although bwt is sometimes still translated ‘abomination’, the consensus of contemporary Egyptologists suggests a meaning more at ‘taboo’. Specified foods (e.g. pork, fish, honey), behaviors (e.g. sexual activity, walking ‘upside-down’) and people (e.g. menstruating women, ...


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These appear to be Jewish assumptions, rather than historical details about Egyptian culture. The Targum Onkelos says in explanation of Genesis 43:32: Ch 41-44: And Joseph made haste, for his compassions were moved upon his brother, and he sought to weep, and he went into the chamber [JERUSALEM. Into the chamber] the house of sleep, and wept there. And ...


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You are right in saying both Hebrew and Greek words just mean "messenger". The English word "angel" is transliterated from αγγελος. All passages containing "messenger" make most sense when looking see what the actual "message" is that is being brought by the "messenger". The message is more important that the one who brings it. Related Strongs Numbers ...


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Έπιστάτης appears in the NT only in Luke (5:5; 8:24, 45; 9:33, 49; 17:13). In case except the last, the word appears on the lips of a disciple. Marshall, in this NIGTC calls the make of the last reference a near disciple (203). Marshall agrees with Oepke’s TDNT article (II, 622f.) that the word is a translation of the Palestinian Aramaic, רַבִּי. Marshall ...


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As noted the meaning of the phrase σαββάτῳ διαπορεύεσθαι may be indirectly related to Luke’s description of the resurrection and if so raises a question of Luke's Passover narrative: Chrysostom's Homily indicates two consecutive Sabbath days - then one would expect the same construction in the Byzantine version of Luke's Passion narrative - if-and only-...


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BDAG has the following for the word in question from Galatians 5:20: φαρμακεία, ας, ἡ (also-κία; X., Pla. et al.; Vett. Val., pap, LXX; En, AscIs; Philo, Spec. Leg. 3, 94; 98; Ar. 13, 7; Tat. 18, 1) sorcery, magic (φάρμακον; Polyb. 38, 16, 7; Ex 7:11, 22; 8:14; Is 47:9, 12; Wsd 12:4; 18:13; En 7:1; SibOr 5, 165) Rv 18:23. Pl. magic arts 9:21 (v.l. ...



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