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24

The Hebrew word was used for winged creatures that weren't insects. Applying 'modern science' to an ancient culture's classifications of the world is anachronistic. The Tyndale Bible Dictionary reads: Modern scientists classify organisms on the basis of internal and external structure, but the biblical writers generally classified organisms according to ...


12

In modern Hebrew, עטלף, the word to which I believe you are referring, indeed means bat. But Targum Yonason (I know the Hebrew, I am referring to the source material at the moment) translates that word as טרפידא in Aramaic, which, based on the roots, (to capture prey by chasing it down and ripping it apart) leans more towards a sort of owl or other bird of ...


11

That seems unlikely. The word is clearly a compound of προ, which is equivalent to the English prefix "pre-", and ορίζω which means: v. define, fix, designate, detail, determine, prescribe, set As far as I can tell, this particular definition still applies to the word in modern Greek.


10

I think the best answer is summed up by Peter Leithart (who admits to borrowing liberally from James Jordan on this): To get the point of Ecclesiastes, we have to ignore the usual translations of several key words or phrases. The Hebrew hebel has been translated as "vanity" (NASB, KJV, ESV, ASV) or "meaningless" (NIV, New Living Translation). The ...


9

Textual Usage The word 'archangel' (lemma: ἀρχάγγελος) appears twice in the New Testament, at least once in the LXX translation of the book of Enoch (which mentions numerous angels and their duties and authority - I would read it here or here if this topic interests you), and also in a highly disputed verse in 2 Esdras. It should be noted that after the ...


9

I decided to build a canonical answer to this question, since it seemed that all three answers had something to offer. Greek and Hebrew The Hebrew word yare (Strongs H3372) carries a number of meanings. There is both the definition being "terrified" or "afraid" along with the definition of having "reverence", "awe", or "respect". In Greek, the word ...


8

There are places in the Bible where "the world" means less than the globe, yet it would still not include all of Africa or Eurasia. For instance, "all the world should be taxed" in Luke 2:1. Clearly, Augustus' decree only held weight in the Empire, its provinces, and protectorates. Acts 11:28 is similar "a great famine over all the earth." That would ...


8

Short Answer: "Generally it is the only translation" (but it is complicated) First, there are two (three?) different words in the references you give. The Nephilim (נְפִילִים; a word only ever found in plural form in OT) only appears three times in Gen 6:4 and Num 13:33 (twice). The word in 1 Ch 20:8 (also 1 Ch 20:6 and 1 Ch 8:2; cf. also 1 Ch 4:12) is ...


7

Based on the uses in Eccl 1:2 the use of the word vanity in English was likely built on the Latin Vulgate use of "Vanitas Vanitatum". It was then translated Vanity of Vanities in a number of English translations including ESV, NASB(U), KJV, NKJV, ASV, RSV, Darby, Douay-Rheims, Noah Webster's, World English Bible and Young's Literal Translation. The idea of ...


7

I've often heard that 'fear' as in 'fear the LORD' should not be understood to be 'fear' as in 'afraid', but rather 'awe' and 'reverence'. But myself, I want to be cautious about watering down the 'fear' as in 'afraid' side, because: I feel a sort of cultural pressure to do so which I think I then read back into the bible There are usages that clearly ...


7

Bruce M. Metzger writes in Bibliotheca Sacra 150 (July-September 1993) (pp 277–278): The great majority of these hapax legomena occur also in other Greek sources, and so the meaning of most of them is not often in dispute. The meaning, however, of a word in the Lord's Prayer as recorded in Matthew 6:11 and Luke 11:3 has often been debated. Does ...


7

According to Waltke/O'Connor, "the Qal...is simple semantically in that notions of causation are absent." (p. 362). Qal is kinda like the Greek aorist of Hebrew (btw the LXX translates it with an aorist). There is no idea causation being communicated in the stem. This is not to say there is none being implied by the broader context. However, the parsing only ...


7

A survey of the uses of these words in Johannine literature will be conducted. ἀγάπη (agape): "The quality of warm regard for and interest in another, esteem, affection, regard, love (without limitation to very intimate relationships, and very seldom in general Greek of sexual attraction)."1 This word appears in the noun form 30 times in 25 verses of ...


7

If indeed the Gospel of Matthew was written in Greek, then Matthew simply wrote the Greek word Χριστοῦ (pronounced [khrē-stoo']), which is the genitive of Χριστός (pronounced [khrē-stos']). Matthew 1:1 Βίβλος γενέσεως Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ, υἱοῦ Δαβὶδ, υἱοῦ Ἀβραάμ Declension Paradigm of the Greek Word χριστός Nominative, singular number: χριστός ...


7

An accurate translation of εκκλησια would be 'assembly'. Also, εκκλησια is used as a near-synonym with συναγωγη. Here are a few examples of εκκλησια in the Septuagint (though I am using the common verse numbers, not the LXX's). Leviticus 8.3: assemble (εκκλησιασον) all the gathering (συναγωγην) Deuteronomy 9.10: the day of the assembly (εκκλησιας) ...


7

OLD TESTAMENT USAGE: The word "poiema" us used only twice in the New Testament, as you say. But in the Greek translation of the Old Testament, the same word is used several times: 1Sam. 8:8 According to all the works which they have done since the day that I brought them up out of Egypt, even to this day—with which they have forsaken Me and served other ...


7

This may be related to another question about the parable that is the context for this question on Matthew 18:34 in particular. OP: What is the original word used in our oldest manuscripts and how has that word been traditionally used? The word used here for "torturers" is τοῖς βασανισταῖς or, in its lexical form, βασανιστής (basanistēs). There are no ...


7

The key clause in Genesis 2:18 is אֶעֱשֶׂהּ־לּוֹ עֵזֶר כְּנֶגְדּוֹ ʾeʿĕśeh-lô ʿēzer kᵉnegdô I will make for him a helper fit for him This noun (עֵזֶר, ʿēzer, the same root that the name "Ezra" comes from) appears 21× in the Hebrew Bible.1 It is indeed used for Israel's help from the LORD, unambiguously, e.g., in Ps 33:20[esv] Our soul waits for ...


6

The definition of λῃστῶν is: λῃστής, οῦ, ὁ (ληϊς, epic form of λεία ‘booty, spoils’; Soph., Hdt.+; ins, pap, LXX; ApcSed 15:3; Joseph.; loanw. in rabb.; Ar. 3, 2; Just., Tat., Ath., R. 19 p. 72, 25; Theoph. Ant. 3, 14 [p. 232, 13]). ① robber, highwayman, bandit (in Palestine: Jos., Bell. 2, 125; 228 al.) Lk 10:30, 36; 2 Cor 11:26 (Chariton 6, 4, ...


6

From my understanding of Strong's and Thayer's, γραφὰς always means, "sacred writings." It does not necessarily imply the entire canon as Christ used the word to refer (presumably) to the Tanach. In addition, it does not even imply which canon is to be trusted (as there were several present at that time). All of that being said, I think it is fairly safe to ...


6

Peter almost certainly didn't think of canonicity the way we do today. As Ignatius Theophorus points out, the Greek word (as used by New Testament writers) refers to sacred writings. In its most common use among early Christians, the word γραφὰς referred to those writings that could be read in church; however, Clement, bishop of Rome in the late first ...


6

Absurd, as in this school of philosophy, does a good job of capturing what the book is all about. Chapter 1 3. What do people gain from all their labors at which they toil under the sun?  4. Generations come and generations go, but the earth remains forever. 5. The sun rises and the sun sets, and hurries back to where it rises...7. All streams ...


6

Within Johannine literature, there seems to be quite a bit of overlap in the uses of the agapao and phileo word groups. Here are a number of pairings of verses across the body of work wherein there seems to be no distinguishable difference of usage. Each pairing below begins with a verse using the agapao word group followed by a similar one using the phileo ...


6

There were two main qualifications, one is primarily cultural, and one is really universal. A host family (or person) would need to be hospitable. Abraham, Lot, and others throughout the Old Testament were "lovers of strangers" (to use an anachronistic expression derived from the Greek word for hospitality). In the ANE, hospitality and being a good ...


5

The usual hermeneutic rule is that words are interpreted to mean what they usually mean in the wider culture unless there's good reason to read it differently. For instance, in the New Testament, the word εὐαγγέλιον (gospel) begins to take on a specific sense related to the good news of Jesus Christ. It becomes a technical term. In order for the term ...


5

The phrase 'poor of the Saints' (πτωχους των αγιων) is just what it means from the most reliable sources I have looked up. Kittel notes that this 'collection for the poor' without indicating there was any debate about its meaning in the original Greek: The accent is to be placed on the fact, not that they are poor saints at Jerusalem, but that they are ...


5

We have no records of the word being used prior to the Lord's prayer. The NET Bible translates: 6:11 Give us today our daily bread They then note that other potentially valid translations would include “Give us bread today for the coming day,” or “Give us today the bread we need for today.” Unfortunately, the Greek term appears only in early ...


5

Genesis 1 as a whole describes the creation of the physical world, so it would be inconsistent to view the light as figurative rather than physical unless you read the whole chapter that way. On that basis, then, the light is physical, but what is its nature? As summarized here, the talmud records a debate about the light in Chagigah 12a. One opinion is ...


5

Both the Greek verb προσκυνέω and its Hebrew equivalent השתחוה literally mean "pay homage," "make obeisance." It is an act of reverence given to one's superior. Contrary to popular belief, it is not solely used in reference to God. For example, see Exo. 18:7: And Moses went out to meet his father in law, and did obeisance, and kissed him; and they asked ...


4

I think the "meaning" of this word in the context is that Yahweh (God) will lift the curse from the ground. The thorns and thistles (nettles) are the result of the curse on the ground. Isaiah is prophesying that there will be a time when these products of the curse of the ground will be removed, and then substituted with "living" plants that actually bear ...



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