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While I partially agree with David's analysis, I think it misses the point and context. Let's start with some fundamentals. First, lets consider the Jewish theory that while in the Garden of Eden, Adam and Eve could not die. Second, let's also consider that while in the Garden of Eden, Adam and Eve did not have complete free will in the sense that they ...


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For a careful examination of the extra-biblical and potential biblical evidence, I recommend A. Philip Brown II, "Chrysostom & Epiphanius: Long Hair Prohibited as Covering in 1 Cor. 11:4, 7," Evangelical Theological Society 15 Nov. 2011: 1-15 Brown argues that the more plausible understanding of this expression is "having [long hair] on his head," with ...


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The sources that Liddell and Scott cite for meanings other than 'glory' are all much older than the NT: Homer (7-8th century BC) Aeschylus (5th century BC) Euripides 5th century BC) Herodotus (5th century BC) Pindar (5th century BC) Demosthenes (4th century BC) Plato (4th century BC) Thucydides (4th century BC) Xenophon (4th century BC) Liddell and Scott ...


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Even if this "surely" in Genesis 2:16 were meant to imply predestination (which does not seem likely), it does not refer to eating from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, but to eating from all the other allowed trees. 16 And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, “You may surely eat of every tree of the garden, So this verse is not about the ...


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I do not pretend to know the minds of the ESV revisers. But there is some justification for their rendering of Genesis 2:16, although exploring the (possible) reasoning cannot be done briefly. Here we go... Genesis 2:16-17 We need the text, and in this case it is imperative to work from the Hebrew, with the immediate context also in view (I'll stick with ...


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This is an instant where the Greek doesn't capture it's original sense in the Hebrew. In Hebrew 'kabod'(glory) originally meant 'weight'. We see this illustrated in 2 Chron. 5:14, So that the priests could not stand to minister by reason of the cloud: for the glory of the LORD had filled the house of God. In Ex. 33:22, the Lord says to Moses, ...


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As a matter of fact שָׁכְרָה actually does mean “to become drunk”. It is a very common and unambiguous root in Hebrew, with cognates all across Semitic. See for example here: http://biblehub.com/hebrew/7937.htm


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Go back to your Perseus link and look up the unabridged LSJ. You will see several attestations for the meaning "glory" in Koine Greek (LXX and NT). http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/morph?l=do%2Fchs&la=greek#lexicon


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The Masoretic Text(from the Hebrew Bible) says,(Hag. 1:6) You have sown much and you bring in little. You eat without being satiated. You drink without getting your fill. You dress, and it has no warmth. And he who profits, profits into a bundle with holes Interestingly, Rashi's Commentary says: and you bring in little: because of the ...


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Copied from my answer to this question (as suggested by @Jack Douglas). Actually, most modern translations are done from the original languages (or are revisions of previous translations that were translated from the original languages), and it usually states so in the first pages of that edition of the Bible. The problem with asking for something that ...


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The translation of almah as virgin makes no sense in context. First, the word almah is a vague term that means a young woman. Betulah is a more specific term for a virgin, especially one whose signs of virginity are still in tact. See Bably. Talmud Yevamot 60b ("והא אמר רבי שמעון 'בתולה' בתולה שלימה משמע" -"and Rabbi Shimon says that the word "betulah" ...


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A note about the flavor of the two major extant text traditions: The LXX was very Messianic in interpretation, in keeping with Jewish tendencies at the time. In contrast, after the events of the first century, Judaism became very anti-Christian to the point of altering interpretations (and even the text at times) where Christians had claimed Scriptural ...


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Dinah is called a parthenos in Genesis 34:3 after being raped in Genesis 34:2. Not sure what the LXX translators were thinking there either. They could have easily used the feminine adjective for "young" as a substantive, as in Titus 2:4 where "young wives/women" is translated from tas neas. Other possible Greek words are korasion and "korē" (e.g. "The ...


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1 Thessalonians 1:4 - Stephanus Textus Receptus 1550 εἰδότες ἀδελφοὶ ἠγαπημένοι ὑπὸ θεοῦ τὴν ἐκλογὴν ὑμῶν Knowing | brothers | beloved | by/of | God | the | election | of you Knowing, brethren beloved, your election of God. (KJV) Here we see in the King James that the First Three Words match to the Greek. Next it says "your election" the Greek does support ...


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Προσευχόμενοι δὲ μὴ βαττολογήσητε, ὥσπερ οἱ ἐθνικοί δοκοῦσιν γὰρ ὅτι ἐν τῇ πολυλογίᾳ αὐτῶν εἰσακουσθήσονται (Matthew 6:7 Stephanus Textus Receptus 1550) What does βατταλογήσητε mean? 945 battologéō – properly, to blubber nonsensical repetitions; to chatter (be "long-winded"), using empty (vain) words (Souter). (Source). What does Προσευχόμενοι mean? ...


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A survey of ancient incantations will reveal that it was common to repeat phrases over and over. This was thought to cause a god to better hear you and for the one offering up the incantation to better bend the ear of the subject of his prayer - typically in order to cause the spell or incantation to have more effect. In this way, God is distinguishing ...



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