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Actually, it shows that Paul was very good at logic. Anthony Thiselton tackles this question in his article "The Logical Role of the Liar Paradox in Titus 1:12,13: A Dissent From the Commentaries in the Light of Philosophical and Logical Analysis", Biblical Interpretation 2.2 (1994): 207–223. Thiselton acknowledges that the commentaries uniformly take this ...


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From the link posted by Paul Vargas, found here: Our restatement of Sharp’s rule is believed to be true to the nature of the language, and able to address all classes of exceptions that Winstanley raised. The “Sharper” rule is as follows: _ In native Greek constructions (i.e., not translation Greek), when a single article modifies two ...


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One presumptive analysis is to view all the grammatical situations extant in the Greek New Testament (NA28) and Septuagint where the following morphological string occurs: <START> any definite article (in the genitive case) <WITH> any noun (in the genitive case) <WITH> any possessive pronoun (in the ...


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Apostle Paul also knew that people will not endure sound doctrine and warned Timothy about it: For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine, but according to their own desires, because they have itching ears, they will heap up for themselves teachers; - 2 Timothy 4:3 In 1 Timothy 1:8-10, apostle Paul described what is contrary to sound ...


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Actually it shows that Paul was not very good at logic. Paul is referring to a particular quasi-historical Cretan and a poem he once wrote to illustrate a logical fallacy. The quasi-historical/quasi-mythical Cretan writer Epimenides once wrote in Cretica Cretans, always liars and this is the statement that Paul is referring to. In logic and ...



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