Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

There is an obvious implied rule from the actual listed forbidden birds, that you can use to infer the rules: birds that eat seeds or insects are fine, birds that eat meat, fish, or carrion are not. It's basically an injunction against birds of prey, sea-birds, and carrion birds, and (I believe) this is how it is interpreted. So that if you ask is an emu ok, ...


5

"Is it a good interpretation of the phrase?" In substance, yes--context shows it is the Jewish holidays being referred to. Martin Luther, in his Commentary on Galatians, agrees, commenting on "days and months and times and years" with: The Apostle Paul knew what the false apostles were teaching the Galatians: The observance of days, and months, and ...


5

Being awed and inspired by the world's beauty is not the same thing as a teleological argument. In Psalm 19, the psalmist captures the experience of wonder, a core component of the religious experience and offers an awareness of God's manifestation in the physical world (all translations are by Robert Alter): The heaven's tell God's glory, and his ...


4

[JPS translation and verse numbering throughout, unless otherwise noted] Chapters 1 and 2 - Locust Chapters 1 and 2 describe a plague of locust: What the locust swarm has left the great locusts have eaten; what the great locusts have left the young locusts have eaten; what the young locusts have left other locusts have eaten (1:4). ...


3

"Days and months and seasons and years" does indeed refer to the levitical calendar (corresponding to weekly sabbaths, new moons, annual festivals, and sabbatical years). Paul likely uses the generic language (as opposed to the more specific terms used in Col 2:16) in order to place Torah's calendar into the same class as the various calendrical observances ...


3

It seems from the context (see Gal. 3) that Paul was not rejecting holidays, even Jewish ones, rather, he was making the point to them that since we have been saved, we are free from the bondage of the law and should not enslave ourselves again. He was telling them that as we have been saved by faith, we should also walk by faith, not trusting in the works ...


3

First, I think it obvious that Jonah did not put this prayer to paper inside the leviathan, but wrote these words sometime later. Second, it isn't obvious who the author of the book itself is. Perhaps Jonah himself wrote it, but we really don't know. Third, it's unavoidable to notice that the book includes details that smack of hyperbole1: Jonah ...


2

Background Job is generally thought to be among the most ancient of the surviving Hebrew texts, if not the oldest.1 Exactly when the account was penned is not known, but the best guess as to the time period portrayed is around the time of Abraham or later. Therefore it's entirely possible that the author knew the sources of the Gilgamesh epic. One of the ...


2

As a practical matter, birds are harder to catch and distinguish from afar. Remember, you could corral a pig or cow, but domesticated fowl were far more rare. (I'm forgetting now if they had chickens in ancient Israel or not). Bird hunting with bow and arrow is also not something you did very often either. In short, you don't really get close up to birds, ...


2

I’m trying to restrict my answer to explaining the text; the full question is perhaps better asked on Jewish Life and Learning. Wiki is flat-out wrong. Psalms 107:22 reads “ויזבחו זבחי תודה” let them offer the sacrifices of thanksgiving; the word זבח unambiguously refers to sacrificial offerings. Psalms 107 is referring to reasons why someone would bring ...


1

Jon, great question. My first observation is that I never use a Bible translation that supplies words to make its translators' views clear. I am sitting here with my Nestle-Aland 27th ed., and can verify that there is in the cited passage no word that could possibly be translated religious or anything like it. The translators here, perhaps well meaning, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible