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Most commentary on this passage (and Mt 12:25) stumbles on the rather misleading translation of "ἐνθυμήσεις" into English as "thoughts". In ancient Greek philosophy, "thumos" was quite distinct from a person's intellect (nous, noeo, noema) or reason (logizomai). Thumos, according to Liddell and Scott, is "soul, spirit, as the principle of life, feeling and ...


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The textual variants are ἰδὼν and εἰδώς. According to Tischendorf, ἰδών is the well attested variant. ἰδών is a participle declined in the aorist tense, active voice, nominative case, masculine gender, and singular number. It is derived from the aorist tense verb εἶδον. εἰδώς is a participle declined in the perfect tense, active voice, nominative case, ...


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Your question immediately brought to my mind a verse in John's Gospel which precedes what is perhaps the most famous chapter in the Bible, save perhaps for Psalm 23. Here is the verse in context: "Now while Jesus was in Jerusalem at the feast of the Passover, many people believed in his name because they saw the miraculous signs he was doing. But Jesus ...


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Thank you all for your insight full comments. I would say that I favor the conclusion of Thayer's Greek Lexicon (which I found here: http://biblehub.com/greek/2644.htm ) Specifically that "but the passive is used also where only one ceases to be angry with another and receives him into favor; thus καταλλαγεις, received by Cyrus into favor, Xenophon, an. 1, ...


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There are 28 instances of the Aorist Passive Imperative (Second Person Plural) in the Greek New Testament (NA28), which are found in 27 verses. Please click on the thumbnail, below, to view all of these instances in the New Testament. The Aorist Passive Imperative (Second Person Plural) is therefore not uncommon. Some verbs, such as δεήθητε (Matt 9:38), ...


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Aorist In non-indicative moods (like the imperative) the "tense" indicates aspect and not time. So the aorist here indicates either a puntiliar (instantaneous) or undefined (generic) kind of action. Passive The active voice is used in Greek when the subject is performing the action (e.g. "he is eating"), while the passive is used to indicate an action ...



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