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Evidence against inclusion Codex Sinaiticus is the earliest manuscript with a complete copy of Mark's Gospel, although even it only dates from the fourth century. Sinaiticus and some other important manuscripts do not include "Son of God." Christian authors up to the fourth century, including Origen, Epiphanius, and Victorinus quote Mark 1:1 without “son ...


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In order to view the relevant "leaf" on P66, please click here. To view the complete transcript of this leaf, please click here. In order to view the relevant "leaf" on P75, please click here and view the large image at the bottom of the page. To view the complete transcript of this leaf, please click here. The brackets in the transcript supply suggested ...


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The article in Greek does not function like it does in English (where it makes a word definite.) As I have outlined here, the presence of the article in Greek typically stresses identity, while the absence typically stresses quality. (However, there are even exceptions to this rule, so we need to be careful with blanket statements.) So yes, it could refer ...


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The translation of the New Testament in the New International Version (NIV) is based upon "the Koine Greek language editions of the United Bible Societies and of Nestle-Aland."(1) Specifically, it is based on the Nestle-Aland 27th edition. The Greek text of the NA27 states: ὅτι δέ ἐστε υἱοί ἐξαπέστειλεν ὁ θεὸς τὸ πνεῦμα τοῦ υἱοῦ αὐτοῦ εἰς τὰς καρδίας ...


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There are so many similarities between the stories of Lazarus in Luke and John that you are right to recognise that there is evidence of copying. The usual scholarly position is that the story in Luke is original to Luke and that the author of John was inspired by this parable and by the Lukan story of Mary and Martha. Even if the name 'Lazarus' were a ...


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The word θεός occurs 159 times in the dative singular in the Greek New Testament (NA28). In all cases with the anarthrous construct (no occurrence of the definite article), the reference is not to "a god" but is instead in reference to the creator of the heavens and earth. In other words, there appears no references to "a god" in the Greek New Testament, ...



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