Hot answers tagged

6

From the Introduction to the NIV Exhaustive Concordance [NIVEC], with some interspersed commentary: Advances in biblical scholarship have made it difficult, if not impossible, to use Strong's century-old system. In the first place, Strong's system indexes only the vocabulary of the original-language texts that underlie the KJV. This means some words ...


5

Hermeneutics is the science and art of interpretation. So "after" one studies the principles of how to interpret (of which there are varying philosophies about what these principles are, hence various hermeneutics), then comes the application of actually doing interpretation of texts. One never really "finishes" learning about hermeneutics, and one never ...


5

This answer is intended as a follow-up to fdb’s answer, with which I basically agree. OP: Is it a Greek-ism? Yes. Atticism might be another appropriate word. As mentioned, the phrase of interest is ἄνδρες ἀδελφοί (andres adelphoi; men, brothers). This appears to be modeled on the typical Athenian oratorical introductory formula, andres Athenaioi ("...


4

The technical terms you're looking for are: Greek - proem from προοίμιον "opening, introduction"; Latin - exordium, the Latin equivalent of proem (see also Wikipedia) These are, essentially, the author's own "preface" to the following work which orients readers to its leading themes and aims. The much-cited study by B. A. van Groningen, "The Proems of ...


2

In general different words are used to convey different meanings: Children (τέκνα) The Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children (τέκνα) of God. (Romans 8:16 KJV) That is, They which are the children (τέκνα) of the flesh, these are not the children (τέκνα) of God: but the children (τέκνα) of the promise are ...


1

There is a distinction. The Spirit Himself witnesses with our spirit that we are children of God (Rom. 8:16; cf. John 1:12). The Spirit witnesses to our most elementary relationship with God, that is, that we are His children; it does not witness that we are His sons or His heirs. The fact that the "begetting" Father wants His children to grow unto ...


1

ἀδελφός in the singular means “brother”, but the plural ἀδελφοί is used also for “brother(s) and sister(s)”. This usage is classical, for example in Euripides and Herodotus. By contrast, ἀνήρ, plural ἄνδρες means “man, male, husband”. The inclusive term for “men and women” is ἄνθρωποι. So when the Apostle addresses his audience as “ἄνδρες, ἀδελφοί” the ...


1

There are several terms for this. I'll list them from most colloquial to most technical: Purpose, aim, or goal Authorial intent Telos (Greek for end or goal) Illocutionary aim (or illocutionary intent; from Speech-Act Theory) These are probably the main terms you'll come across nowadays.


1

I will focus on the difference between the account in John's Gospel and that in the Synoptics. I will start with two assumptions: John had the text of the Synoptics available before him when composing his Gospel, so that when he deviated from the Synoptics' account he did it on purpose and for a purpose, which was providing not just factual accuracy (which ...


1

The simplistic answer would be to say that each evangelist chose to include historical details that he thought to be relevant, while omitting other details that he knew to be true but felt it not necessary to report. This overlooks the fact that Matthew and Luke are regarded by almost all New Testament scholars to have been substantially based on Mark's ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible