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6

OP's interest in quantifying Paul's (or, if you like, the NT's Pauline tradition) most frequently used designations for "Christians" makes for a challenging question, and one that would take a long time to deal with definitively. Here is my best shot. Methodology: I have tabulated the figures for the thirteen NT letters in the "Pauline tradition", using the ...


5

This answer is intended as a follow-up to fdb’s answer, with which I basically agree. OP: Is it a Greek-ism? Yes. Atticism might be another appropriate word. As mentioned, the phrase of interest is ἄνδρες ἀδελφοί (andres adelphoi; men, brothers). This appears to be modeled on the typical Athenian oratorical introductory formula, andres Athenaioi ...


4

It seems to me that there are two interconnected problems raised by the formulation of the question. I think it would help to disentangle them: "meek" v. "humble" The question of contrasting "meek" and "humble" is bound up with changing English usage. "meek" tends to be somewhat quaint in usage, and certainly not so prevalent in English usage as it once ...


4

There is no particular reason to shy away from the rhetorical aspects of the contents of the Bible. Yes, I'm a rhetorician (i.e., an expert in rhetoric), but any ol' Christian or Jew can appreciate any one or more of the following concepts: Thesis A "book" of the Bible, whether it comprises history, law, prophecy, poetry, proverbs, Gospels, epistles ...


3

The technical terms you're looking for are: Greek - proem from προοίμιον "opening, introduction"; Latin - exordium, the Latin equivalent of proem (see also Wikipedia) These are, essentially, the author's own "preface" to the following work which orients readers to its leading themes and aims. The much-cited study by B. A. van Groningen, "The Proems of ...


1

ἀδελφός in the singular means “brother”, but the plural ἀδελφοί is used also for “brother(s) and sister(s)”. This usage is classical, for example in Euripides and Herodotus. By contrast, ἀνήρ, plural ἄνδρες means “man, male, husband”. The inclusive term for “men and women” is ἄνθρωποι. So when the Apostle addresses his audience as “ἄνδρες, ἀδελφοί” the ...


1

There are several terms for this. I'll list them from most colloquial to most technical: Purpose, aim, or goal Authorial intent Telos (Greek for end or goal) Illocutionary aim (or illocutionary intent; from Speech-Act Theory) These are probably the main terms you'll come across nowadays.


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Wikipedia defines eisegesis as the process of interpreting a text or portion of text in such a way that the process introduces one's own presuppositions, agendas, or biases into and onto the text. This is commonly referred to as reading into the text. Randall Price puts it a little differently in The Secrets of the Dead Sea Scrolls, page 83, where he ...



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