Hot answers tagged

7

OP's interest in quantifying Paul's (or, if you like, the NT's Pauline tradition) most frequently used designations for "Christians" makes for a challenging question, and one that would take a long time to deal with definitively. Here is my best shot. Methodology: I have tabulated the figures for the thirteen NT letters in the "Pauline tradition", using the ...


7

Jesus is being compared to John the Baptist by the Pharisees in that John ate sparingly and only things such as locust and honey and drank no wine. Jesus ate pretty much whatever he wanted to and drank wine, and was accused of gluttony and being a winebibber or drunken, because of this. They thought John the Baptist diet strange and too controlled, but when ...


6

First I checked that the same phrase appears in both Col 3:16 and Eph 5:19. It does. psalmois, humnois, kai odais pneumatikais I then checked those words out in the lexicons and compared the words they translated in the LXX. psalmois - often for neginah, which means song, or mizmor, also meaning song. Used 92 times in the LXX but mostly in the title ...


6

From the Introduction to the NIV Exhaustive Concordance [NIVEC], with some interspersed commentary: Advances in biblical scholarship have made it difficult, if not impossible, to use Strong's century-old system. In the first place, Strong's system indexes only the vocabulary of the original-language texts that underlie the KJV. This means some words ...


5

Hermeneutics is the science and art of interpretation. So "after" one studies the principles of how to interpret (of which there are varying philosophies about what these principles are, hence various hermeneutics), then comes the application of actually doing interpretation of texts. One never really "finishes" learning about hermeneutics, and one never ...


5

This answer is intended as a follow-up to fdb’s answer, with which I basically agree. OP: Is it a Greek-ism? Yes. Atticism might be another appropriate word. As mentioned, the phrase of interest is ἄνδρες ἀδελφοί (andres adelphoi; men, brothers). This appears to be modeled on the typical Athenian oratorical introductory formula, andres Athenaioi ("...


5

Likely polyptoton based on the ancient Hebrew prayer Nishmat that ends "shir ushvaha, hallel v'zimra" translated into Koine, in which case it would not necessarily be appropriate to look for a distinct meaning for each term. Attributed variously to the Apostle Peter and to Shimon ben Shatah, I guess depending on which side of the fence you are on, and ...


4

According to F.F. Bruce's Israel and the Nations (p 108): "the God of Heaven" is a title by which Yahweh is commonly designated under the Persian regime The phrase is not just used in Daniel, but also used in Ezra 7:12 where Ezra is designated "scribe of the law of the God of heaven" in Artaxerxe's letter to Ezra. It is used throughout the book of ...


4

Jesus means none of the four things you noted Here is a slightly expanded context to the words you quote. John the Baptist had just sent messengers to confirm some things about Jesus (Lk 7:18-23). After they leave, Jesus says some very impressive words about John the Baptist (Lk 7:24-28). At this point is... Luke 7:29-35 29 (All the people, even the ...


4

It seems to me that there are two interconnected problems raised by the formulation of the question. I think it would help to disentangle them: "meek" v. "humble" The question of contrasting "meek" and "humble" is bound up with changing English usage. "meek" tends to be somewhat quaint in usage, and certainly not so prevalent in English usage as it once ...


4

The technical terms you're looking for are: Greek - proem from προοίμιον "opening, introduction"; Latin - exordium, the Latin equivalent of proem (see also Wikipedia) These are, essentially, the author's own "preface" to the following work which orients readers to its leading themes and aims. The much-cited study by B. A. van Groningen, "The Proems of ...


3

Hermeneutics as an academic discipline is descriptive up to the point at which "rules for good interpretation" are applied. We can, for example, speak of speech-act-theory, and discuss how one arrives at his or her own interpretation. That would be descriptive hermeneutics. There are certainly basic rules that make some interpretations "better" i.e. - ...


2

Because earlier while Jesus prayed in the garden, Jesus asked His father, God, "If it be thy will let this cup pass from me", in a request that He not have to suffer death on the cross. This was before the incident in the garden where He is arrested and Peter draws His sword. At this point Jesus is referring to the fact that God required Jesus to go as a ...


2

In the story you point out it makes sense to think about their sources. It seems that Matthew and Mark had almost the exact same source material--probably either well known oral tradition or an actual document that is lost to us. Luke seems to have had the same source as Matthew and Mark, but also some extra information that he decided to include. John, ...


2

In general different words are used to convey different meanings: Children (τέκνα) The Spirit itself beareth witness with our spirit, that we are the children (τέκνα) of God. (Romans 8:16 KJV) That is, They which are the children (τέκνα) of the flesh, these are not the children (τέκνα) of God: but the children (τέκνα) of the promise are ...


1

There is a distinction. The Spirit Himself witnesses with our spirit that we are children of God (Rom. 8:16; cf. John 1:12). The Spirit witnesses to our most elementary relationship with God, that is, that we are His children; it does not witness that we are His sons or His heirs. The fact that the "begetting" Father wants His children to grow unto ...


1

ἀδελφός in the singular means “brother”, but the plural ἀδελφοί is used also for “brother(s) and sister(s)”. This usage is classical, for example in Euripides and Herodotus. By contrast, ἀνήρ, plural ἄνδρες means “man, male, husband”. The inclusive term for “men and women” is ἄνθρωποι. So when the Apostle addresses his audience as “ἄνδρες, ἀδελφοί” the ...


1

There are several terms for this. I'll list them from most colloquial to most technical: Purpose, aim, or goal Authorial intent Telos (Greek for end or goal) Illocutionary aim (or illocutionary intent; from Speech-Act Theory) These are probably the main terms you'll come across nowadays.


1

Wikipedia defines eisegesis as the process of interpreting a text or portion of text in such a way that the process introduces one's own presuppositions, agendas, or biases into and onto the text. This is commonly referred to as reading into the text. Randall Price puts it a little differently in The Secrets of the Dead Sea Scrolls, page 83, where he ...


1

There are depths within this question. If we consider the nature of the writers of the four accounts it may help put things into perspective. Matthew (Matthias Levi - described as the son of Alphaeus, although there are problems with this) may have been the author of ‘Matthew’s’ gospel, but more probably ‘Matthew’ is a dedication. Even so the author may ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible