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Two-thousand years ago a rabbi was a teacher and advisor but not, by himself, a legal authority. Questions of interpreting the law were argued in rabbinic courts, study halls, and ultimately the sanhedrin. The talmud is in large part a written record of those arguments. A typical argument might go as follows: R. Yehoshua said that the law (on some topic) ...


8

My reading of the Gospels—especially Mark—is that Jesus operated in grey territory from the perspective of human authority. For instance, right at the beginning of his ministry, the people were amazed at his authority: And they were astonished at his teaching, for he taught them as one who had authority, and not as the scribes. —Mark ...


7

Based purely on the text you quoted: it seems to be neither. He was upset at what he saw and took the law into his own hands, causing losses to those he attacked. (I'm talking only about the direct losses, like those coins and any animals that weren't recovered, and not indirect losses of sales.) The laws in place at the time called for him to instead ...


7

hekal(הֵיכָל) means 'palace' or 'temple'. It is used to refer to the Solomon's Temple but also (for example) the house at Shiloh in David's time, here in 1 Samuel 1:9 After they had eaten and drunk in Shiloh, Hannah rose. Now Eli the priest was sitting on the seat beside the doorpost of the temple of the Lord. ESV Among other usages, it can also refer ...


5

Abstract Neither of these views captures what Jesus was doing by clearing the temple. Rather, Jesus was acting as (more than) a prophet, judging the temple system and enacting a symbol of its coming destruction. Mark's Account In Mark 11, the story is told as a sandwich story: a. Jesus curses a fig tree. b. The narrative is interupted as Jesus enters ...


5

You just about have your answer right in the question. The short answer is that moving eastward seems to relate to exile, while moving westward is a return to the garden and the presence of God. The long answer: The garden is planted in the east of Eden The garden is the primeval meeting place between God and man. It is the first sanctuary, where man is ...


4

One of the two great themes of the book of John is that those who believe can have life in Jesus’ name. (John 20:31) In John 14-17 Jesus revealed the magnitude of this teaching, showing that he desires people to be one with him, just as he is one with the Father. In the next few verses after John 14:2, Jesus tried to emphasize that he was going to the ...


4

The Temple in Jerusalem was known as "the house of God" (2 Cor. 5:14) and "the house of YHVH" (1 Kings 8:10). However, we may conclude that this is not the "Father's house" to which Yeshu'a was referring, since that very house would be destroyed in 70 A.D. The physical Temple in Jerusalem had no further relevance to the body of Christ after Christ offered ...


4

When the sun rises, in the East, it banishes the darkness of the night. On the other hand, as the sun sets, in the West, it ushers in the darkness. Throughout both the Christian and Hebrew scriptures the images of light represent God/holiness/goodness and images of darkness represent sin/danger/evil. Here are just a few: 2 Samuel 22:29 - You are my lamp, ...


4

So far I've found two "surveys" (links below), both of which agree that there are four main interpretations of the vision: Literal (post-Exile) - Under this view the vision anticipates a literal new temple built after the exiles' return. There is little evidence, though, that any of the returning exiles considered the pattern given in the vision as ...


4

Jesus had the legal authority to cleanse the temple not because he was a rabbi but because he claimed to be like Solomon, the "Son of David" and thus the builder of God's house (2 Samuel 7). This is evident from a careful reading of the gospels through the lens of the Hebrew Bible. In the synoptics the temple cleansing is immediately preceded by Jesus' ...


4

Though Jesus was called 'Rabbi' the term was used in it's primitive meaning of 'great' one. He was not formally educated as a Rabbi[1] and had no earthly credential to teach as one, and certainly no man made institution gave him authority. He claimed it as his own Father's house [2], and they were unwilling to challenge him on it. [1] Joh 7:15 And the ...


3

I agree with Soldarnal that Jesus is symbolically enacting the temple's coming destruction. But I disagree that his authority was simply from heaven. Jesus claimed to be like Solomon, the "Son of David" and thus the rightful builder of God's house. See my response to Did Jesus have the legal authority to cleanse the temple? for more. But why did Jesus ...


3

This isn't really meant to answer your question; it is more me thinking out loud and trying to learn. I'm less than a layman when it comes to hermeneutics, but I thought it was an interesting question about a Biblical account that I love, and I'd like to get @Jon Ericson's comments on my thoughts. Poking around the board a bit, it seems like you really know ...


3

I had thought about this when I read Gen 11:2 "As people moved eastward, they found a plain in Shinar and settled there" I asked myself "east" from where? The answer, as has been stated above, is "east from Eden". Eden is where God's Presence was. The way back to Eden was now protected by Cherubim: Gen 3:24 So He drove out the man; and He placed cherubim ...


3

Perhaps not the entire answer, but the Sun does rise in the east. So for practical reasons, the door of the tabernacle and temple should face east so that there is light for ceremonies early in the morning. (It would be facing the west if ceremonies happened in the late afternoon, I suppose.) It may be that the rising sun is invoked as a symbol of God's ...


3

According to Vincent's Word Studies: Temple of God According to some, a figure of the Christian Church. Others, the temple of Jerusalem. Barnes' Notes on the Bible defends the first reading: The phrase "the temple of God" is several times used with reference to the Christian church, 1 Corinthians 3:16, 1 Corinthians 3:17; 2 Corinthians 6:16; ...


2

In the Greek New Testament, there seems to be the distinction between the Tabernacle and the Temple, which "houses" the Tabernacle. For the example, both the Greek word for "temple" (ναός) and "tabernacle" (σκηνή) occur together in the following verse. Revelation 15:5 Καὶ μετὰ ταῦτα εἶδον, καὶ ἠνοίγη ὁ ναὸς τῆς σκηνῆς τοῦ μαρτυρίου ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ... ...


2

To be in God's "Resting Place" is to be in His tabernacle (mshknuth). This is the place of rest; this is also the place where the brazen altar, the altar of incense, lampstand, and the Holy of Holies are found. Until Solomon's Temple (approx. 1000 BC), the tabernacle was where God dwelt, all the laws concerning worship, sacrifices, rituals were prescribed ...


2

Ezekiel's book focuses on the Temple: its desolation (1–24) and glorification (33–48). In the earlier section we see the Glory of God forsaking the temple and city as a necessary final step before Jerusalem could be laid waste (8–11). In the latter section we are shown the glory of God returning to the temple (43:4–5). Ezekiel did not introduce a ...


2

According to strong’s definition, Yakin יָכִין means He will establish. While Boaz who was an ancestor of David means quickness בֹּ֫עַז . However as the meaning of Boaz is uncertain in Hebrew it would be better to follow the Septuagint where according to Barne’s Notes on the Bible in the margin reference is translated Boaz Ἰσχύς as ‘Strength.’ “The ...


1

I apologize for the length of this one but your question demands a thorough answer. Who is the man? From the immediate context his is only what it says, 'a man'. He is a man who has a 'special interest'. He is a man provisioning for the miraculous visionary, prophetic and thus mysterious future expansion of Israel. In the immediate context this vision is ...


1

The book of Ezekiel follows a literary pattern laid down in the Torah. It begins in the Sanctuary/Garden, moves out to the Land, then out to the World (the Gentile nations), then moves back to the Land and then to the Garden. We see this in the pattern from Adam to Noah, where Noah is a new Adam but a better one. So the first part of Ezekiel judges and ...



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