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51

It's hard to get inside the minds of people from other cultures, especially when we are separated by time as well as distance. And the main problem here is cultural: We have an expectation of greater precision than ancient people did. The other answers hint at this, but IMO they don't fully appreciate the divide between modern and ancient levels of ...


33

Many different explanations have been proposed. The best article I've read on the subject is The Number Pi in the Bible by Abarim Publications. I'll begin with what I think is the obvious and correct explanation, then mention some other explanations (mentioned e.g. in the article above). 10 ≠ 10.0 (rather, "10" means (10.0 ± 0.5)) 1 Kings 7:23 says ...


12

To start with, compare the circle the diameter we're given would make with the circle the circumference we're given would make: Since a circumference is π times the diameter, a 'pure' circle of 10 cubits in diameter as we describe the sea as having would be 10π cubits in circumference, or roughly 31.4 cubits. Now, since the circumference attributed to ...


10

My reading of the Gospels—especially Mark—is that Jesus operated in grey territory from the perspective of human authority. For instance, right at the beginning of his ministry, the people were amazed at his authority: And they were astonished at his teaching, for he taught them as one who had authority, and not as the scribes. —Mark ...


7

hekal(הֵיכָל) means 'palace' or 'temple'. It is used to refer to the Solomon's Temple but also (for example) the house at Shiloh in David's time, here in 1 Samuel 1:9 After they had eaten and drunk in Shiloh, Hannah rose. Now Eli the priest was sitting on the seat beside the doorpost of the temple of the Lord. ESV Among other usages, it can also refer ...


6

Abstract Neither of these views captures what Jesus was doing by clearing the temple. Rather, Jesus was acting as (more than) a prophet, judging the temple system and enacting a symbol of its coming destruction. Mark's Account In Mark 11, the story is told as a sandwich story: a. Jesus curses a fig tree. b. The narrative is interupted as Jesus enters ...


6

You just about have your answer right in the question. The short answer is that moving eastward seems to relate to exile, while moving westward is a return to the garden and the presence of God. The long answer: The garden is planted in the east of Eden The garden is the primeval meeting place between God and man. It is the first sanctuary, where man is ...


5

One of the two great themes of the book of John is that those who believe can have life in Jesus’ name. (John 20:31) In John 14-17 Jesus revealed the magnitude of this teaching, showing that he desires people to be one with him, just as he is one with the Father. In the next few verses after John 14:2, Jesus tried to emphasize that he was going to the ...


5

Though Jesus was called 'Rabbi' the term was used in it's primitive meaning of 'great' one. He was not formally educated as a Rabbi[1] and had no earthly credential to teach as one, and certainly no man made institution gave him authority. He claimed it as his own Father's house [2], and they were unwilling to challenge him on it. [1] Joh 7:15 And the ...


5

we don't even know what the real numerical value of pi is. When written out as a number, it will always be rounded. The question is: At which decimal place will you believe God's Word is true? The hundredth decimal place, the thousandth decimal place? I'm guessing for most, there will never be enough decimal places. For me pi = 3 is close enough.


5

From a post by Cecil Adams, aka The Straight Dope In 150 A.D. a Hebrew rabbi and scholar named Nehemiah attempted to explain away the anomaly in Chronicles by saying that the diameter of the tub was 10 cubits from outer rim to outer rim, whereas the 30 cubit circumference was measured around the inner rim. In other words, the difference between the ...


5

When the sun rises, in the East, it banishes the darkness of the night. On the other hand, as the sun sets, in the West, it ushers in the darkness. Throughout both the Christian and Hebrew scriptures the images of light represent God/holiness/goodness and images of darkness represent sin/danger/evil. Here are just a few: You are my lamp, O LORD; the ...


4

I agree with Soldarnal that Jesus is symbolically enacting the temple's coming destruction. But I disagree that his authority was simply from heaven. Jesus claimed to be like Solomon, the "Son of David" and thus the rightful builder of God's house. See my response to Did Jesus have the legal authority to cleanse the temple? for more. But why did Jesus ...


4

So far I've found two "surveys" (links below), both of which agree that there are four main interpretations of the vision: Literal (post-Exile) - Under this view the vision anticipates a literal new temple built after the exiles' return. There is little evidence, though, that any of the returning exiles considered the pattern given in the vision as ...


4

Jesus had the legal authority to cleanse the temple not because he was a rabbi but because he claimed to be like Solomon, the "Son of David" and thus the builder of God's house (2 Samuel 7). This is evident from a careful reading of the gospels through the lens of the Hebrew Bible. In the synoptics the temple cleansing is immediately preceded by Jesus' ...


3

According to Vincent's Word Studies: Temple of God According to some, a figure of the Christian Church. Others, the temple of Jerusalem. Barnes' Notes on the Bible defends the first reading: The phrase "the temple of God" is several times used with reference to the Christian church, 1 Corinthians 3:16, 1 Corinthians 3:17; 2 Corinthians 6:16; ...


3

If it meant "cow of soil," פרה would need to be in the genitive, and thus פרת. I don't think the genitive inflection of that word even occurs in scripture.


3

According to strong’s definition, Yakin יָכִין means He will establish. While Boaz who was an ancestor of David means quickness בֹּ֫עַז . However as the meaning of Boaz is uncertain in Hebrew it would be better to follow the Septuagint where according to Barne’s Notes on the Bible in the margin reference is translated Boaz Ἰσχύς as ‘Strength.’ “The ...


3

I had thought about this when I read Gen 11:2 "As people moved eastward, they found a plain in Shinar and settled there" I asked myself "east" from where? The answer, as has been stated above, is "east from Eden". Eden is where God's Presence was. The way back to Eden was now protected by Cherubim: Gen 3:24 So He drove out the man; and He placed cherubim ...


3

Perhaps not the entire answer, but the Sun does rise in the east. So for practical reasons, the door of the tabernacle and temple should face east so that there is light for ceremonies early in the morning. (It would be facing the west if ceremonies happened in the late afternoon, I suppose.) It may be that the rising sun is invoked as a symbol of God's ...


3

There’s more to Jesus’ violent actions in the temple then the exchange rate. Here are three all too often overlooked reasons Jesus cleansed the temple. 1. Jesus as the “Son of David” is the Builder of God’s House In His entrance into Jerusalem on a donkey, Jesus claimed to be like Solomon, the “Son of David,” in his coronation (1 Kings 1) and thus ...


2

This isn't really meant to answer your question; it is more me thinking out loud and trying to learn. I'm less than a layman when it comes to hermeneutics, but I thought it was an interesting question about a Biblical account that I love, and I'd like to get @Jon Ericson's comments on my thoughts. Poking around the board a bit, it seems like you really know ...


2

Ezekiel's book focuses on the Temple: its desolation (1–24) and glorification (33–48). In the earlier section we see the Glory of God forsaking the temple and city as a necessary final step before Jerusalem could be laid waste (8–11). In the latter section we are shown the glory of God returning to the temple (43:4–5). Ezekiel did not introduce a ...


2

As was described in this Mi Yodeya article, priests only actually worked in the temple for 2 days a year. This is a result of the priests being divided up into 24 groups (mishmarim) for Temple service, with each group being further subdivided by family. So even priests over the age of thirty would have had a lot of time on their hands to do things other ...


2

In the Greek New Testament, there seems to be the distinction between the Tabernacle and the Temple, which "houses" the Tabernacle. For the example, both the Greek word for "temple" (ναός) and "tabernacle" (σκηνή) occur together in the following verse. Revelation 15:5 Καὶ μετὰ ταῦτα εἶδον, καὶ ἠνοίγη ὁ ναὸς τῆς σκηνῆς τοῦ μαρτυρίου ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ... ...


2

To be in God's "Resting Place" is to be in His tabernacle (mshknuth). This is the place of rest; this is also the place where the brazen altar, the altar of incense, lampstand, and the Holy of Holies are found. Until Solomon's Temple (approx. 1000 BC), the tabernacle was where God dwelt, all the laws concerning worship, sacrifices, rituals were prescribed ...


2

Reading from the preceding section in the same chapter, the temple cited in verse 17 is referring to the collective body of believers (amplified in 1 Cor 3:10-14), and therefore not to our individual bodies as temples of God (which is mentioned later in 1 Cor. 6). The following words in Greek (highlighted in bold) are in the plural form, which substantiates ...


2

Did Jesus give in to political pressure by paying the temple tax as recorded in Matthew 17? Jesus gave an explanation in his answer; Matthew 17:27a Notwithstanding, lest we should offend them... This principle we can see also given by Paul; Romans 12:18 If it be possible, as much as lieth in you, live peaceably with all men. The instruction ...


1

Jerusalem coming down from the heavens is actually mentioned a few verses earlier in Revelation 21:2: I saw the Holy City, the new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride beautifully dressed for her husband. It's meaning follows in the next verse: And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Look! God's dwelling ...


1

No, Jesus did not subject Himself to the law of the land by paying the temple tax. For one thing, the temple tax (see Exodus 30:12 ff.) was not a law of the land, but it was a law of Moses imposed on the "sons of Israel" both as a ransom for them and for the maintenance of the "tent of meeting" (i.e., the tabernacle). By paying the temple tax Jesus was ...



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