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7

hekal(הֵיכָל) means 'palace' or 'temple'. It is used to refer to the Solomon's Temple but also (for example) the house at Shiloh in David's time, here in 1 Samuel 1:9 After they had eaten and drunk in Shiloh, Hannah rose. Now Eli the priest was sitting on the seat beside the doorpost of the temple of the Lord. ESV Among other usages, it can also refer ...


7

In this particular case, the translator's note from the NET Bible is helpful: The meaning of the word תְּחָשִׁים (tÿkhashim) is debated. The Arabic tuhas or duhas is a dolphin, and so some think a sea animal is meant – something like a dolphin or porpoise (cf. NASB; ASV “sealskins”; NIV “hides of sea cows”). Porpoises are common in the Red Sea; their ...


5

An alternate translation is “assembling” rather than “ministering”; the relevant root is צבא, see, e.g., Wiktionary. Try this translation on for size: He made the washstand of copper and its base of copper; from the mirrors of the assembled [women], who congregated at the entrance of the tent of meeting. The translation of “ministering” is somewhat ...


5

Simple answer, building on Ron’s longer one: The words “every man” at the end of the verse is not gender-specific, but can also be translated as “everyone”. Try this translation on for size: They came, both men & women; all the generous of heart brought clasp, nosering, ring, and vulva-cover, all gold implements—everyone that brought an offering of ...


5

See the Encyclopedia Judaica on taḥash for the earliest ancient translations—"blue", "purple", "violet" (Volume 19, page 435), and the reference links at Wikipedia's tachash article (e.g. Living Torah on Exodus 25:5 footnotes "blue-processed" citing ancient sources; and Natan Slifkin's Sacred Monsters on "The Tachash" also citing the ancients "leather ...


4

The text just says "make" (in the Hebrew too) and this does not imply overlaying some other material, but the text provides an interesting hint. Ex. 30:1-5 is the command, as quoted in the question. The actual construction is described in 37:25-27, where the same language is used: 25 And he made the altar of incense of acacia-wood [...] 27 And he made ...


4

I just want to pop in here to add that it's important to remember that the way that we think of "blue", "purple", and "red", is necessarily not the same as how the Biblical audience would have thought of "tekheleth", "argaman", and "shani". In particular, I'm not sure that the "red+blue=purple" argument is particularly applicable here, since these colours ...


4

If their gold casting techniques had not changed from the time they left Mt. Sinai, then the gold was not pure. Ex 32:4 And he received [them] at their hand, and fashioned it with a graving tool, after he had made it a molten calf: and they said, These [be] thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt. Ex 32:20 And he ...


4

The Greek text of Heb. 9:4 is, χρυσοῦν ἔχουσα θυμιατήριον καὶ τὴν κιβωτὸν τῆς διαθήκης περικεκαλυμμένην πάντοθεν χρυσίῳ ἐν ᾗ στάμνος χρυσῆ ἔχουσα τὸ μάννα καὶ ἡ ῥάβδος Ἀαρὼν ἡ βλαστήσασα καὶ αἱ πλάκες τῆς διαθήκης The phrase in question is χρυσοῦν θυμιατήριον (chrysoun thymiatērion). Both the accusative and nominative declension are spelled ...


3

I am proposing two options, one obvious and one subtle. The obvious meaning of blue, purple and scarlet, would be that they are associated with precious fabrics and in some cases even royal colors. I think this is sometimes the meaning that they convey in the Bible. For example,  When Mordecai left the king’s presence, he was wearing royal garments of ...


2

The text does not say what the women did when they were ministering. Possibly they were greeting people as they entered the temple? Possibly helped direct visitors or provided a cup of water to thirsty visitors? Maybe they just kept things clean and organized? Regarding the mirrors, it seems that the women were not very vain for otherwise they would not be ...


2

See the Wikipedia page for Tabernacle for the jumping-off point to a large literature on this subject, including a modern model. Naḥmanides (Ramban) famously expounded on the subject, see 'Perush 'al ha-Torah' (Commentary on the Torah), Exodus 25:1 and also see the Midrash Exodus Rabbah 35a (for discussion of the planks of acacia wood). Someone may convert ...


2

If the rings are on the bottom, as v12 seems to indicate, then I would see no problem with them being solid gold, since they're more for "containment" of the poles than to support then entire weight via suspension. Gold is not the most structurally-sound material in tension, but in compression it's certainly strong enough for the purpose at hand.


1

Sensus plenior provides means for solving riddles since things which take metaphoric meaning must have that meaning everywhere they occur. The first clue is that though blue, purple and scarlet are closely associated most of the time, occasionally gold is added to the group. We have a group of colors following the pattern of 3+1. This is the pattern of ...



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