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The Romans usually only crucified insurrectionists. That is, people who had an agenda to harm their empire. "Thief" or "robber", therefore, is unfortunate language as we interpret that in our culture as someone who steals. But, Barabbas and those crucified alongside Jesus were more likely thought of by the Romans as Terrorists. What we know historically, ...


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All the Godhead dwells in Jesus, Jesus is the Father, Son and Holy Ghost. I believe it was God which is spirit talking to the Man nature of Christ. Jesus prayed to his self. The man nature of him praying to the divine nature. The Godhead is Jesus, fully man and fully God.


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The answer to the question is that they are different. During a single sermon, Jesus taught on two different kingdoms with two different types of righteousness: For I say to you, that unless your righteousness exceeds the righteousness of the scribes and Pharisees, you will by no means enter the kingdom of heaven. (Matthew 5:20 NKJV) But seek first ...


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The original of this passage is in Mark's Gospel, simply because it is the strong consensus of New Testament scholars that Mark was written first and was the main source used by the authors of the other two synoptic gospels. Thus, the most reliable way to establish the original meaning of this passage seems to be to look in Mark. The term 'kingdom of God' ...


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Since the stories are incompatible, can we conclude that at least one of them was invented? How can we tell which is true, if any? I would like to challenge the assumption that the the two narratives of the birth of Jesus are incompatible. Roman Catholic scholar Raymond Brown writes: This leads us to the observation that the two narratives are not ...


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In the original Hebrew we find the LORD (yud-hey-vahv-hey) says to my Lord (Adonee). The second lord, being in the singular, is referring to a human king or nobleman. In historical context it becomes clear that this psalm, written by David, was meant to be sung by the kohenim during temple liturgy. The kohenim would sing "The LORD says to my lord (king ...


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The simple answer is, of course they are different, they are describing actions that happened on two separate occasions. One narrates from His birth until 40 days later; while the other tells of events that happened around the age of two. First you have to remember that there were no chapter and verse markers in the original Greek; you can’t always assume ...


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In view of the fact that διάβολος and σατανᾶς have different basic meanings (i.e. "slanderer" and "adversary"), it appears that the NT authors were choosing terms that emphasized those different characteristics of the one creature we know as Satan. Note that a number of other appellations, some of which are proper nouns, are ascribed to the person of Satan ...



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