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Jews reject the argument that Cain's sacrifice was insufficient because it did not involve blood, and they have some good arguments. Leviticus clearly spells out various "grain offerings," and there is even one example of a "sin offering" where the poor people were allowed to offer grain instead of an animal sacrifice. (See Lev. 5:11-13.) The traditional ...


5

Onan's sin was entirely related to his refusal to perform his levirate duty. Quickly about the other three: Coitus interruptus is not masturbation. It is a (very unreliable) method of birth control. Onan was attempting not to get Tamar pregnant because he did not want to provide an heir for his deceased older brother. It was not "theft of Tamar's child." ...


4

The answer to your question is best examined by looking at Onan's sin in the context of the exchange between Judah and Tamar and requires a good understanding and background of the place of women in ancient middle eastern culture and the purpose of Leverite marriage practices. We must remember that this culture had no medicare and no social security. ...


3

Let's follow the context: Chapter 5: when there is no commandment to break, nothing has been broken. Sin has not been "committed." But death in the world was evidence that sin has existed (and remains) since Adam. After comparing Jesus with Adam 5 times, he introduces the real purpose of the law: an instrument to magnify, for us, the reality of sin. But ...


2

Sexual Sin According to Jubilees, Er sinned by refusing to sleep with Tamar: (1) And in the forty-fifth jubilee, in the second week, (and) in the second year, Judah took for his first-born Er, a wife from the daughters of Aram, named Tamar. (2) But he hated, and did not lie with her, because his mother was of the daughters of Canaan, and he wished to ...


2

Before we compare the two verses, we should first determine the original message and context given when they were written. » [1 Timothy 2: 9-16] (NASB) 9 - Likewise, I want women to adorn themselves with proper clothing, modestly and discreetly, not with braided hair and gold or pearls or costly garments, 10 - but rather by means of good works, as is proper ...


2

Good question. Strictly speaking, we don't know how commonly held the belief was (as we do not have a huge number of documents from that exact time period, and certainly "opinion surveys" didn't exist then). However, the IVP Commentary does a good job of explaining the probable background based on rabbinic comments from the following centuries. I will ...


2

Restatement of the Question: Why was Abel's sacrifice considered 'greater', 'more', or 'above' Cain's? Was it because they were different types of sacrifice, or was there something else at work? Historically, there is a great amount of speculation regarding this passage, but this answer is constrained to Scripture only : Answer 1: Because Cain ...


1

Sacred prostitution was practised widely throughout the Mediterranean world and probably originated as a fertility ritual. The prostitute, whether male or female, could charge a fee on behalf of the temple for which he or she worked. These are not common prostitutes, but sacred prostitutes, for which the Hebrew language uses different words. The practice ...


1

No, it is not a valid assumption that because certain sins won't be forgiven in the hereafter then some will. Pointing out that it is not a crime to drink alcohol in France does not mean that it is a crime here. Nor does it mean that it is also a crime here. Simply put it makes no assertion about anything than that which it affirms. Inference, without an ...


1

In "On the City of God against the Pagans" (De Civitate Dei Contra Paganos), Book 21, Ch. 24, Augustine wrote, For some of the dead, indeed, the prayer of the Church or of pious individuals is heard; but it is for those who, having been regenerated in Christ, did not spend their life so wickedly that they can be judged unworthy of such compassion, nor so ...


1

And you, who were dead in your trespasses and the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made alive together with him [Christ], having forgiven us all our trespasses, Colossians 2:13 (ESV) The participial phrase "having forgiven" in the text shows that we are already forgiven by God the time he quickened us. This coheres with Romans 5:8: but God ...


1

The writer of Hebrews analyses why Abel's sacrifice was accepted and Cain's wasn't. Hebrews 11:4 By faith Abel offered to God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain, through which he obtained witness that he was righteous, God testifying of his gifts; and through it he being dead still speaks. The difference between the two sacrifices was that Abel brought ...


1

The first chapter of Robert Alter's The Art of Biblical Narrative (part of which is available on Amazon as a preview), uses the Tamar story to illustrate the interconnectedness of seemingly disjointed narratives. The final author of Genesis placed the story in the middle of the broader Joseph arc that ends with Israel's other children becoming servants of ...



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