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Jews reject the argument that Cain's sacrifice was insufficient because it did not involve blood, and they have some good arguments. Leviticus clearly spells out various "grain offerings," and there is even one example of a "sin offering" where the poor people were allowed to offer grain instead of an animal sacrifice. (See Lev. 5:11-13.) The traditional ...


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Onan's sin was entirely related to his refusal to perform his levirate duty. Quickly about the other three: Coitus interruptus is not masturbation. It is a (very unreliable) method of birth control. Onan was attempting not to get Tamar pregnant because he did not want to provide an heir for his deceased older brother. It was not "theft of Tamar's child." ...


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The answer to your question is best examined by looking at Onan's sin in the context of the exchange between Judah and Tamar and requires a good understanding and background of the place of women in ancient middle eastern culture and the purpose of Leverite marriage practices. We must remember that this culture had no medicare and no social security. ...


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Before we compare the two verses, we should first determine the original message and context given when they were written. » [1 Timothy 2: 9-16] (NASB) 9 - Likewise, I want women to adorn themselves with proper clothing, modestly and discreetly, not with braided hair and gold or pearls or costly garments, 10 - but rather by means of good works, as is proper ...


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Good question. Strictly speaking, we don't know how commonly held the belief was (as we do not have a huge number of documents from that exact time period, and certainly "opinion surveys" didn't exist then). However, the IVP Commentary does a good job of explaining the probable background based on rabbinic comments from the following centuries. I will ...


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Restatement of the Question: Why was Abel's sacrifice considered 'greater', 'more', or 'above' Cain's? Was it because they were different types of sacrifice, or was there something else at work? Historically, there is a great amount of speculation regarding this passage, but this answer is constrained to Scripture only : Answer 1: Because Cain ...


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The writer of Hebrews analyses why Abel's sacrifice was accepted and Cain's wasn't. Hebrews 11:4 By faith Abel offered to God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain, through which he obtained witness that he was righteous, God testifying of his gifts; and through it he being dead still speaks. The difference between the two sacrifices was that Abel brought ...


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Although Paul is not specific about the "evils" he practiced, (vs 19.) we know that they were a culmination of sins that were counter to his mindful desires not to do them, but did them as a result of a mind vs. flesh struggle. To be more specific it's necessary to examine the context of Romans chapter 7. Romans chapter 7 verses 7-25 are the subject of much ...


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τὸν μὴ γνόντα ἁμαρτίαν ὑπὲρ ἡμῶν ἁμαρτίαν ἐποίησεν....1 "For he caused him who knew nothing of sin to be sin for us...." The preceding vv. 18-20 make it clear that 'he' is θεός (God), and 'him who knew nothing of sin' in this context is Χριστός (Christ). The presence of the article (τὸν) with the participle γνόντα indicates that it functions as a ...


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The Greek word ἁμαρτίαν (hamartian) is the accusative case, singular number declension of the noun ἁμαρτία (hamartia), a feminine gender noun. It occurs 174 times in the King James Version wherein it is translated as follows (according to blueletterbible.org): sin (172x) sinful (1x) offense (1x) In Heb. 10:6, it is actually translated as "sacrifices for ...


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And you, who were dead in your trespasses and the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made alive together with him [Christ], having forgiven us all our trespasses, Colossians 2:13 (ESV) The participial phrase "having forgiven" in the text shows that we are already forgiven by God the time he quickened us. This coheres with Romans 5:8: but God ...


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Sexual Sin According to Jubilees, Er sinned by refusing to sleep with Tamar: (1) And in the forty-fifth jubilee, in the second week, (and) in the second year, Judah took for his first-born Er, a wife from the daughters of Aram, named Tamar. (2) But he hated, and did not lie with her, because his mother was of the daughters of Canaan, and he wished to ...



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