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'Clean' (טָהֵר) in Leviticus 16 The Hebrew verb טָהֵר / taher is used consistently throughout the Hebrew Bible in terms of cleansing or purifying, and so in the context of Leviticus 16 the stated meaning is that by performing the described ritual, the High Priest would have his sins cleansed and he would become pure. This ritual purification was required ...


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Onan's sin was entirely related to his refusal to perform his levirate duty. Quickly about the other three: Coitus interruptus is not masturbation. It is a (very unreliable) method of birth control. Onan was attempting not to get Tamar pregnant because he did not want to provide an heir for his deceased older brother. It was not "theft of Tamar's child." ...


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The answer to your question is best examined by looking at Onan's sin in the context of the exchange between Judah and Tamar and requires a good understanding and background of the place of women in ancient middle eastern culture and the purpose of Leverite marriage practices. We must remember that this culture had no medicare and no social security. ...


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Let's follow the context: Chapter 5: when there is no commandment to break, nothing has been broken. Sin has not been "committed." But death in the world was evidence that sin has existed (and remains) since Adam. After comparing Jesus with Adam 5 times, he introduces the real purpose of the law: an instrument to magnify, for us, the reality of sin. But ...


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She was not unclean because she had a baby. She was unclean because there was an issue of blood that came out of her when she gave birth (see Leviticus 12:7). Its the blood, not the baby, that's deemed unclean.


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Sexual Sin According to Jubilees, Er sinned by refusing to sleep with Tamar: (1) And in the forty-fifth jubilee, in the second week, (and) in the second year, Judah took for his first-born Er, a wife from the daughters of Aram, named Tamar. (2) But he hated, and did not lie with her, because his mother was of the daughters of Canaan, and he wished to ...


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Before we compare the two verses, we should first determine the original message and context given when they were written. » [1 Timothy 2: 9-16] (NASB) 9 - Likewise, I want women to adorn themselves with proper clothing, modestly and discreetly, not with braided hair and gold or pearls or costly garments, 10 - but rather by means of good works, as is proper ...


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Good question. Strictly speaking, we don't know how commonly held the belief was (as we do not have a huge number of documents from that exact time period, and certainly "opinion surveys" didn't exist then). However, the IVP Commentary does a good job of explaining the probable background based on rabbinic comments from the following centuries. I will ...


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this article explained everything what I wanted to know: https://www.academia.edu/991221/_Earth_Accuses_Earth_Tracing_Jesus_Writing_on_the_Ground_ summa sumarum: DIVINE FINGER - writer says that Jesus wrote with His finger.Here the author of the passage may be recalling Exodus 31:18, a verse that describes God inscribing covenant provisions with the divine ...


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In the ancient world papyrus was a valuable and expensive commodity. For ephemeral scribblings people used erasable wax tablets, or they wrote on the ground with a stick or a finger. There is the famous story of how the great mathematician Archimedes was drawing geometric figures in the dust when he was murdered by an invading Roman soldier. This was around ...


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Leviticus 16 describes the rites of Yom Kippur (aka "The Day of Atonement"). In the first rite Aaron the high priest bathes in a Miktam making his body clean and dons linen underwear, a linen coat, linen sash and a linen turban. This was the garb of a regular priest, not the high priest. The high priest normally wore more decorative attire and an ephod "for ...


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For it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins. Hebrews 10:4, ESV Hebrews 10:4 means something more than atonement by the phrase 'take away sins'. This verse is in the central section of Hebrews concerning the superiority of the priesthood of Jesus (chapters 8-10). Jeremiah 31 is quoted at length twice in this section which is ...


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The Brown-Driver-Briggs lexicon for the word “clean” is to be morally clean or purified.[טָהֵר]. The sense is to be ceremonially clean or pure. The first time the word is used is in Genesis. It provides a good picture of how this works: So Jacob said to his household and to all who were with him, “Get rid of the foreign gods you have with you, and ...


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Sacred prostitution was practised widely throughout the Mediterranean world and probably originated as a fertility ritual. The prostitute, whether male or female, could charge a fee on behalf of the temple for which he or she worked. These are not common prostitutes, but sacred prostitutes, for which the Hebrew language uses different words. The practice ...


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No, it is not a valid assumption that because certain sins won't be forgiven in the hereafter then some will. Pointing out that it is not a crime to drink alcohol in France does not mean that it is a crime here. Nor does it mean that it is also a crime here. Simply put it makes no assertion about anything than that which it affirms. Inference, without an ...


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In "On the City of God against the Pagans" (De Civitate Dei Contra Paganos), Book 21, Ch. 24, Augustine wrote, For some of the dead, indeed, the prayer of the Church or of pious individuals is heard; but it is for those who, having been regenerated in Christ, did not spend their life so wickedly that they can be judged unworthy of such compassion, nor so ...


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Short and simple answer. Eve was deceived by implication Adam wasn't. He did it knowing it was sin. So knowing he was sinning he entered into sin and condemned all mankind. If you have two children who do something wrong but one of them knew better but the other was just tricked into it, who is usually punished or blamed by the parent for the disobedience?


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Your first question seems to be "should it be translated sin or a sin offering"? I'm inclined to think "sin offering". Your question seems to be "was it a literal substitution or not?" The answer to that question is "not". "Substitution" (as in "strict substitution") is one of the several incorrect "theories of the atonement". The verse in question begins ...


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And you, who were dead in your trespasses and the uncircumcision of your flesh, God made alive together with him [Christ], having forgiven us all our trespasses, Colossians 2:13 (ESV) The participial phrase "having forgiven" in the text shows that we are already forgiven by God the time he quickened us. This coheres with Romans 5:8: but God ...


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The first chapter of Robert Alter's The Art of Biblical Narrative (part of which is available on Amazon as a preview), uses the Tamar story to illustrate the interconnectedness of seemingly disjointed narratives. The final author of Genesis placed the story in the middle of the broader Joseph arc that ends with Israel's other children becoming servants of ...



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