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18

@Richard offered a decent but limited exegetical understanding of the text (he emphasized the definition of the verb but not the grammar behind it), albeit with a strong complementarian doctrinal bias. @Soldernal offered a good contextual study of the text, and made it clear that Paul permits women to speak elsewhere which is helpful to this discussion ...


11

This passage is not easy to understand, not least because certain interpretations offend many modern sensibilities. There are some (relatively minor) issues of textual criticism and of translation. There are some difficult referents, like "law" in verse 34. Moreover, the "crystal clear" line of total silence for women is difficult to adopt because in 1 ...


10

Looking at the verse, we can see that the command is crystal clear for woman to not speak in church. In fact, it mentions this four times in four different ways: The women are to keep silent they are not permitted to speak let them ask their own husbands at home it is improper for a woman to speak in church To further illustrate the point of silence, ...


8

Their responses seem similar and I don't believe it's possible to examine the language and come with the phrasing that leads to the rebuke. His mirrors Gen 15:8 which is not received as harshly. In comparison with Mary's response while hers seems more technical ("How is this going to happen?" - which perhaps implies a belief in something supernatural ...


5

Chapter two of Habakkuk is God’s answer to the prophet’s dramatic pleading with God which starts at the beginning of chapter 1: 2 How long, Lord, must I call for help, but you do not listen? Or cry out to you, “Violence!” but you do not save? 3 Why do you make me look at injustice? Why do you tolerate wrongdoing? Destruction and ...


4

The mere fact that Paul adjoined these two statements gives one reason to think that this apparent contradiction is both intentional and non-contradictory. How does one reconcile these two statements? The straightforward reading of the text makes sense if the "now" in "has been disclosed" is applied to both clauses. I.e., read it as if it were ...


3

Revelation is not the most perspicuous book of the Bible. John Gill has some interesting thoughts on it. He notes that it is false that "this silence the sum of this seal, or the only thing in it". Rather, it probably "includes the preparation of the seven angels to take their trumpets," in verse 2, "though none of them were sounded during this period." ...


3

This is a bookend to the the beginning of Romans: Paul, a servant of Christ Jesus, called to be an apostle, set apart for the gospel of God, which he promised beforehand through his prophets in the holy Scriptures, concerning his Son, who was descended from David according to the flesh and was declared to be the Son of God in power according to the ...


2

Gabriel seems to be the same person who visited Daniel to explain the meaning of his visions. Since those visions were very troubling, Gabriel's message was welcome and an answer to prayer. Gabriel also visited Zechariah as he served at the altar of incense in the Temple. In that case, Gabriel was there to explain how and why Zechariah's wife, Elizabeth, ...


2

It is an interesting image which I've read a few commentators take different approaches toward. What is it that they are never to speak about again because of their shame? Assuming for a moment that it is not simply a blanket muteness then what subject is it that Jerusalem (and perhaps, by extension, all those who have received atonement) are to remain ...


2

It seems more likely that this is a separate thought. God not being the God of confusion fits more naturally with what has preceded the statement, namely that the spirits of the prophets are subject to other prophets. The next set of thoughts begins "As in all the churches of the saints, the women must be silent." The present imperative can carry inceptive ...


2

This repetition seems to me to be more about being specific and emphatic than anything else - (I'm not making any statement about a modern application here!!). e.g. as in all churches, ... so in your Corinthian churches.


2

When Paul (1Cor 14:33) was refering to the Law he may have used the term in its wider sense as the whole Torah including the 1st Book of Moses where it is stated that (as a consequence of the transgression in Eden) the man would from then on rule over the woman. (Without conflict there would have been no such order.) The Law itself expands on the matter of ...


2

This is a minor translation issue, here's the way I like it (Wikisource Habakkuk): How is a statue useful? Because it's sculptor made it a mask, and a lying teacher: because the creator trusts his own creator over him to make idols dumb. Woe to he who tells the wood, "awake!", "Arise!" to the still stone. He will teach--- "Here it is wrapped in gold and ...


2

The Hebrew Word for Silence The word here, הַ֥ס, "be silent" or "still" (has; qal: הָסָה, hasah; Strong's 2013), seems like a cognate of English "hush!" (Gesenius claims this is onomatopoeic; and though I see what he means, I find it ironic to claim such about silence.) The Presence of Yahweh in His Temple Thinking Biblical-theologically, Yahweh's ...


1

Not sure if this exegesis is ‘deep’. I take the connection to be this: The Prophet has been showing the madness of thinking one can make an idol out of wood and then imagine that it will speak, for it is just something made by hands. In contrast to this God is real and His habitation is in heaven, and yet He has taken abode in his temple in Israel. The ...



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