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8

At first glance it seemed strange to me as well. However, given that the context is the good things that occur to the wicked, and in the next verse (14) we see how the wicked take these things for granted, it makes sense that it would be a positive thing, and going down to sheol in a moment wouldn't be. The root is רגע , which aside for 'moment' can actually ...


7

Based purely on the text you quoted: it seems to be neither. He was upset at what he saw and took the law into his own hands, causing losses to those he attacked. (I'm talking only about the direct losses, like those coins and any animals that weren't recovered, and not indirect losses of sales.) The laws in place at the time called for him to instead ...


6

It's not implying that we'll become actual stars, but that we will become like stars. That "those who are wise shall shine like the brightness of the sky above". This brings to mind the radiance of God that we saw shining around Moses after he came down from Mount Sinai: Exodus 34:29 (NIV) When Moses came down from Mount Sinai with the two tablets of ...


5

Abstract Neither of these views captures what Jesus was doing by clearing the temple. Rather, Jesus was acting as (more than) a prophet, judging the temple system and enacting a symbol of its coming destruction. Mark's Account In Mark 11, the story is told as a sandwich story: a. Jesus curses a fig tree. b. The narrative is interupted as Jesus enters ...


4

If he was a metaphor, to whom did Abram give the tithe? It is possible—even likely, under certain frameworks—that an individual could be both a literal person and a metaphor or "type" of some higher concept or person. I'm also not sure that a silence in the remainder of the Torah is necessarily an indicator of whether he was a literal person, or whether ...


4

I realise I'm a little late to the party, but in the interest of posterity and despite Ecclesiastes 1:15, I would like to answer all those comments and claims that the root רגע has no basis as "calm" or "peaceful" in the tanakh. I'm not sure this is the most natural reading of the verse or even the one I subscribe to, however it certainly has a very solid ...


3

I agree with Soldarnal that Jesus is symbolically enacting the temple's coming destruction. But I disagree that his authority was simply from heaven. Jesus claimed to be like Solomon, the "Son of David" and thus the rightful builder of God's house. See my response to Did Jesus have the legal authority to cleanse the temple? for more. But why did Jesus ...


3

This isn't really meant to answer your question; it is more me thinking out loud and trying to learn. I'm less than a layman when it comes to hermeneutics, but I thought it was an interesting question about a Biblical account that I love, and I'd like to get @Jon Ericson's comments on my thoughts. Poking around the board a bit, it seems like you really know ...


2

To me this is an unsupportable translation. This is the only place the NET Bible picks "peace": moment 8, instant 3, suddenly 2, times 2, continually 1, briefly 1, brief moment 1, peace 1, time 1, regularly 1, while 1, momentarily 1 The Authorized Version never uses "peace" for רֶגַע: moment 18, instant 2, space 1, suddenly 1 Only four of these ...


2

Maybe - and I really don't have anything to substantiate this - it refers to a quick and painless death. "They spend their days in prosperity, and in a moment (without any fading or suffering) their lives end."


2

I see Paul using two separate, but interlocking images in this section. Both turn on the verse left out of the question. Colosians 1:21 (NIV): Once you were alienated from God and were enemies in your minds because of your evil behavior. Restore Creation The first is restoring creation, which fits well with Paul's portrayal of Jesus as creator. ...


2

For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross. But now he has reconciled you by Christ’s physical body through death to present you holy in his sight, without blemish and free from ...


1

The Great Intrusion into creation was sin, which was accompanied by its handmaiden, death (which is both physical and spiritual). It was therefore the work of Christ that had "reconciled" to the Father what sin and death had taken away. In the epistle to the Ephesians there is a parallel verse that sheds light on the passage in Colossians - Ephesians ...



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