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No answer would be complete without this quote from Raymond Brown: The sensus plenior is that that additional, deeper meaning, intended by God but not clearly intended by the human author, which is seen to exist in the words of a biblical text (or group of texts, or even a whole book) when they are studied in the light of further revelation or ...


7

Sensus plenior is used by different people in different ways. The most common meaning used in debates among Catholics and later among Evanglicals is the one offered by Raymond Brown: The sensus plenior is that that additional, deeper meaning, intended by God but not clearly intended by the human author, which is seen to exist in the words of a ...


6

"Sensus plenior" is used to speak of the higher meaning contained in scripture without regard to the arguments concerning who may or may not discern it. Those committed to the literal-historical methodology use the term "Inspired Sensus Plenior" to affirm that the apostles recognized a fuller meaning in the Old Testament without endorsing a modern use of ...


5

After reading a book called ‘the sensus plenior’ by Raymond E Brown, I was disappointed to find that the word sensus plenior is nothing new, contrary to the hype associated with words. The book simply just tries to defend the obvious fact that there is meaning in scripture that goes beyond the understanding of the author. Why anyone would doubt that there is ...


4

I'm not sure if this is necessarily a direct answer to the question, but Peter hints at this in 2 Peter 3:15-16, talking about the writings of Paul. Specifically, he talks about three attributes of Paul's writings that bear consideration: Some of it is difficult to understand - which implies that work must be dedicated to understanding it Some people ...


4

Whether sensus plenior (either inspired or not) exists is largely a question that depends on the particular doctrine an interpretation is evaluated in. Certainly the early Christian writers believed that the Hebrew Scriptures they inherited contained important links with the man they had come to revere as the Messiah. There's no particular reason why they ...


4

Using Google, I find that "inspired sensus plenior" is most closely associated with Robert L. Thomas out of The Master's Seminary. More accurately, he coined the term "inspired sensus plenior applications (ISPA)" to describe a subset of the hermeneutical principles used by New Testament authors: When interpreting the OT and NT, each in light of the ...


4

My understanding of sensus plenior agrees with Richard's: Often, adherents claim that there are two separate meanings to text: the intentional (intent of the author) and the sensus plenior (intent of God). A classic example of this is found in John 11:49-53 (emphasis mine): Then one of them, named Caiaphas, who was high priest that year, spoke up, ...


3

How to interpret scripture using the rules of Sensus Plenior Self examination Jer 17:9 The heart [is] deceitful above all [things], and desperately wicked: who can know it? Our assumptions about scripture and the rules we use to guide our interpretation effect the ultimate meaning that we get from scripture. It is important to evaluate those ...


2

Three types of sensus plenior are explained below. The first is contained in a literal history, the second is contained in a parable and the third are references to sensus plenior in the Old Testament which are problem passages for those who do not recognize sensus plenior. Acts 12 contains sensus plenior hidden in history pointing back to the cross: This ...


2

Gnosticism, Kaballah, MIdrash and Sensus Plenior all deal with riddles. Sensus Plenior is different in the results, the understanding of the nature of riddles, the methods for discerning expanded meaning, the sources used to solve riddles and particularly in the methods of constraining the meaning. Results Gnostic methods produce a version of Kabbalah ...



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