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9

I Sam 31 is written in the voice of the anonymous narrator. This narrator writes with the authority of prophecy and so his version of events is the version that we should accept as correct - Saul fell on his own sword as did his armorer. The story told by the Amaleki kid in 2 Sam 1:8 is obviously a lie - the kid claims to David that he identified himself to ...


7

There are two plausible scenarios: It happened as the Amalekite said. The Amalekite embellished the story thinking he would be rewarded for helping David become king. In scenario 1, though Saul's armourbearer presumed Saul was dead, Saul was 'still kickin' and revived when the Amalekite came by. In scenario 2 the Amalekite came upon the scene and ...


7

It is important to remember that the "historical books" of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings are better called "the earlier prophets." They teach from the prophetic point of view, not simply chronological events. From Hard Sayings of the Bible. It is more important to group things by importance than it is to lay it out chronologically. 17:55–58 Why ...


6

It's important to realize that Saul is unambiguously violating a biblical prohibition in seeking out Samuel: There shall not be found among you any one who maketh his son or his daughter to pass through the fire, or who useth divination, or an observer of times, or an enchanter, or a witch, or a charmer, or a consulter with familiar spirits, ...


2

It seems to me that multiple similar events could both contribute to a phrase becoming a proverb, and that's whats happened here. For example we have the phrase "smart aleck," supposedly derived from the actions of a con-man Aleck Hoag: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/smart_aleck. Aleck did not enter our lectionary for a single action but for repeated ...


1

As to Question #3. The KJV has it written a curse would come from a man eating any food. SO that explains at least that question for you. And the men of Israel were distressed that day: for Saul had adjured the people, saying, Cursed be the man that eateth any food until evening, that I may be avenged on mine enemies. So none of the people tasted any ...


1

The entire verse 11 is in the imperfect mood. It seems then that we must decide if that means that: 1a) It is used to describe a single (as opposed to a repeated) action in the past; it differs from the perfect in being more vivid and pictorial. The perfect expresses the "fact", the imperfect adds colour and movement by suggesting the "process" ...



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