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Good question - could take a book to answer! Here are some brief notes by way of a preliminary answer. The key phrase which unlocks (or veils?) identity is in v. 12: "O Lucifer, son of the morning!" Hebrew: הֵילֵ֣ל בֶּן־שָׁ֑חַר | hêlēl ben-šāḥar Greek: ὁ ἑωσφόρος ὁ πρωὶ ἀνατέλλων | ho heōsphoros ho prōi anatellōn Grk trans.: the Day Star, which ...


5

The Hebrew noun satan, along with related nouns and verbs, are semi-common in the Hebrew scriptures. These terms are used in a variety of contexts and refer to a variety of individuals. In English, satan literally means something like 'opponent', 'adversary', or 'accuser'. The term is not a name, but a descriptive label for the action someone is taking. In ...


4

An angel as a primeval enemy of humanity The Hebrew noun satan, along with related nouns and verbs, are semi-common in the Hebrew scriptures. These terms are used in a variety of contexts and refer to a variety of individuals. In Numbers 22.22,32, for example, it is an angel explicitly acting on God's behalf who is identified as a satan, meaning ...


3

Here is an interesting perspective I found in regard to this. Bullinger, in His Companion Bible, asserts in appendix #19, the Serpent of Genesis: The Hebrew word rendered "serpent" in Gen. 3.1 is Nachash (from the root Nachash, to >shine), and means a shining one. Hence, in Chaldee, it means brass or copper, because of its shining. Hence also, ...


2

While not wanting to detract from @Davïd's terrific answer, I thought I would point out a few other linguistic connections that add some food for thought: Rev 12:8-9 is often mentioned in conjunction with Lk 10:18 due to the semantic similarities they share with Isa 14. While not containing any astral/lightning imagery (as Davïd noted), all three passages ...


2

The verse in question has an interesting parallel to Psalm 48:1-2, where the Hebrew phrase found in Isaiah (בְּיַרְכְּתֵ יצָפֹון) occurs in the Psalm (יַרְכְּתֵי צָפֹון) and therefore draws our attention to both passages. Isaiah 14:13 (NASB) 13 “But you said in your heart, ‘I will ascend to heaven; I will raise my throne above the stars of God, ...


1

The Hebrew says "You [are/were]" but the spelling is unusual. In context we would expect a masculine form, but the word for "you" is in a form that is usually feminine (אַתְּ). If we do not take into consideration the vowels (which were not written in ancient scrolls, but only preserved by oral tradition), the word looks like it could spell אֶת, which can ...


1

Source: Lucifer. (2013). Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia, 6th Edition, 1. The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia suggests: Some early Christian writers found a parallel in the Gospel of St. Luke, where Jesus refers to Satan falling like lightning from heaven. On this basis they identified Isaiah's "Day Star" with Satan and concluded that there was ...


1

"And Jesus ... was led by the Spirit in the wilderness for forty days, being tempted by the devil." There is no indication in the Greek text of Luke 4:1-14 that the Spirit left Jesus to fend for himself, even briefly, when he was πειραζόμενος ὑπὸ τοῦ διαβόλου ("tempted of the devil" in KJV). Ergo, the same motivation that moved him to go INTO the ...


1

The New Testament actually commonly refers to the devil as a prince or god of this world. For example: Now is the time for judgment on this world; now the prince of this world will be driven out. (NIV, John 12:31) I will not say much more to you, for the prince of this world is coming. He has no hold over me (NIV, John 14:30) Again, the devil ...


1

The Devil is considered a prince of a kingdom. To be a prince he must have some kind of power that he wields over his subjects. If we said a king has the power of wealth, we mean he has a lot of money and that he exerts a lot of influence by it. In the same way the 'power of sin' or 'power of death' is something one can have and exert influence with. The ...



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