Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

Good question - could take a book to answer! Here are some brief notes by way of a preliminary answer. The key phrase which unlocks (or veils?) identity is in v. 12: "O Lucifer, son of the morning!" Hebrew: הֵילֵ֣ל בֶּן־שָׁ֑חַר | hêlēl ben-šāḥar Greek: ὁ ἑωσφόρος ὁ πρωὶ ἀνατέλλων | ho heōsphoros ho prōi anatellōn Grk trans.: the Day Star, which ...


7

In Genesis 3:24, it is a Cherubim - an angel of the Lord who guards the Garden of Eden. They are depicted in the tabernacle and on the ark of the covenant, guarding the Throne of God. In all places, they are associated with angelic beings and are part of the host of heaven. The difficulty in giving a verse calling a cherubim an angel is that angelos is a ...


6

The simple answer to the question is: we don't know specifically. So what do we know? He refers to it as an "weakness" or infirmity, as you have it. It's the word astheneia in Greek. The same word is used in both places in 12:9. This "thorn in the flesh" is probably not a reference to the idea of the flesh as the sinful nature, but more likely something ...


6

Within the Tanach/Old Testament there is no association of the angelic “adversary”, the satan¹ in the books of Job and Samuel, to be any sort of fallen or rebellious angel. Aside from the rather obscure verses about the nefilim in Genesis 6, I know of no Biblical verses that Jewish scholars take to refer to fallen or rebellious angels.² The verses in Isaiah ...


5

In the Tanakh the concept of a "satan" exists, but it is not a personification of evil and there's no particular reason to believe there's even just one for all time. The word "satan" is a job description. The best way to render the Hebrew הַשָּׂטָן is probably literally: "the satan", lowercase 's', with definite article (the הַ). It would be misleading ...


5

The Hebrew noun satan, along with related nouns and verbs, are semi-common in the Hebrew scriptures. These terms are used in a variety of contexts and refer to a variety of individuals. In English, satan literally means something like 'opponent', 'adversary', or 'accuser'. The term is not a name, but a descriptive label for the action someone is taking. In ...


5

An angel as a primeval enemy of humanity The Hebrew noun satan, along with related nouns and verbs, are semi-common in the Hebrew scriptures. These terms are used in a variety of contexts and refer to a variety of individuals. In Numbers 22.22,32, for example, it is an angel explicitly acting on God's behalf who is identified as a satan, meaning ...


5

Your parish priest has it right. The usage of the word "satan" (שטן) has evolved over time and several different usages were used concurrently. There is a good summary of the evolution of the usage on Bethelbooks.com. With a bit of simplification we can say that there are three phases in the evolution of the usage: Pre-exilic Post-exilic Post-OT In the ...


5

The Hebrew for the final clause is: וַיָּבוֹא גַם הַשָּׂטָן, בְּתוֹכָם. גַם means "also", so a straightforward reading suggests that the satan was not part of the group. We see another "exclusive gam" in Gen 33:7, where Yaakov's concubines (handmaids) approach Eisav and "gam Leah" -- Leah is not a handmaid but a wife. These are just two examples, ...


4

Though it's not going to be popular, I would suggest that these are the preferred readings of the "Lucifer" tradition. Both here, and Isaiah 13-14, the historical and traditional attempts to reconcile prophetic language with a very concrete concept of a location (Tyre and Babylon, respectively) probably resulted in such an understanding. I'm still on the ...


4

While not wanting to detract from @Davïd's terrific answer, I thought I would point out a few other linguistic connections that add some food for thought: Rev 12:8-9 is often mentioned in conjunction with Lk 10:18 due to the semantic similarities they share with Isa 14. While not containing any astral/lightning imagery (as Davïd noted), all three passages ...


4

Wikipedia is helpful here; much of this answer is adapted from there. The Hebrew satan [שטן] means to oppose or obstruct, more actively than to simply be a stumbling block. In Job and Zechariah, though, mention is made of a particular celestial being identified as ha-satan [השטן] with the definite article ha-; so, “the satan” or “the adversary”. This ...


4

Satan (שָׂטָן) in Hebrew means “enemy” or “adversary” but this “opposition” is in the Old Testament directed in the specific sense of an “accuser”. The idea seems to be that since man has fallen into sin under the curse of Law, the Devil appeals to God’s own justice in order to accuse men and keep them under his domain of death. He is a kind of 'receiver ...


3

It is a common feature of biblical prophecy to conflate various events, people, places, etc. This is related to the theology of types: some events, people, places, etc, foreshadow and picture others. This gives rise to the "mountain peak" metaphor of prophecy: when looking down a range of mountains, it not easy to clearly distinguish them unless you have ...


3

Here is an interesting perspective I found in regard to this. Bullinger, in His Companion Bible, asserts in appendix #19, the Serpent of Genesis: The Hebrew word rendered "serpent" in Gen. 3.1 is Nachash (from the root Nachash, to >shine), and means a shining one. Hence, in Chaldee, it means brass or copper, because of its shining. Hence also, ...


3

The verse in question has an interesting parallel to Psalm 48:1-2, where the Hebrew phrase found in Isaiah (בְּיַרְכְּתֵ יצָפֹון) occurs in the Psalm (יַרְכְּתֵי צָפֹון) and therefore draws our attention to both passages. Isaiah 14:13 (NASB) 13 “But you said in your heart, ‘I will ascend to heaven; I will raise my throne above the stars of God, ...


2

According to Matthew, this is part of the Sermon on the Mount which begins in 5:1 and continues through the end of Matthew 7. In 5:1, Matthew states: "Now when Jesus saw the crowds, he went up on a mountainside and sat down. His disciples came to him, 2 and he began to teach them." so we can conclude that according to the author of Matthew that this is ...


1

The Hebrew says "You [are/were]" but the spelling is unusual. In context we would expect a masculine form, but the word for "you" is in a form that is usually feminine (אַתְּ). If we do not take into consideration the vowels (which were not written in ancient scrolls, but only preserved by oral tradition), the word looks like it could spell אֶת, which can ...


1

הַשָּׂטָן ha-Satan, is the term used for accuser or opposer; he opposes God(and man), and stands in the way to accuse them:(Zech. 3:1-2) And he shewed me Joshua the high priest standing before the angel of the Lord, and Satan standing at his right hand to resist him. 2 And the Lord said unto Satan, The Lord rebuke thee, O Satan In another example, ...


1

I tend to agree with Joseph, where in Isaiah, it refers to O star of the morning, son of the dawn!" this is a direct reference to the Lucifer. If we consider the the following scripture in verse 13 and 14, we see the fall of satan, in his desire to elevate himself to the most high. Now, in comparison with that and the "stars" of God, we see this as a clear ...


1

"And Jesus ... was led by the Spirit in the wilderness for forty days, being tempted by the devil." There is no indication in the Greek text of Luke 4:1-14 that the Spirit left Jesus to fend for himself, even briefly, when he was πειραζόμενος ὑπὸ τοῦ διαβόλου ("tempted of the devil" in KJV). Ergo, the same motivation that moved him to go INTO the ...


1

The New Testament actually commonly refers to the devil as a prince or god of this world. For example: Now is the time for judgment on this world; now the prince of this world will be driven out. (NIV, John 12:31) I will not say much more to you, for the prince of this world is coming. He has no hold over me (NIV, John 14:30) Again, the devil ...


1

The Devil is considered a prince of a kingdom. To be a prince he must have some kind of power that he wields over his subjects. If we said a king has the power of wealth, we mean he has a lot of money and that he exerts a lot of influence by it. In the same way the 'power of sin' or 'power of death' is something one can have and exert influence with. The ...


1

It seems that anyone who is termed the "son of God" is someone who is directly created by God. Thus Adam is the "son of God" because he was directly created by God (Luke 3:38). Likewise, Jesus is the "son of God" because he was begotten by his heavenly father. Satan, like other angels, was created by the direct hand of God (Ezek 28:13), and therefore he too ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible