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Jews reject the argument that Cain's sacrifice was insufficient because it did not involve blood, and they have some good arguments. Leviticus clearly spells out various "grain offerings," and there is even one example of a "sin offering" where the poor people were allowed to offer grain instead of an animal sacrifice. (See Lev. 5:11-13.) The traditional ...


6

Job lived 140 years (Job 42:16), a long life, similar to the patriarchs. For that reason it is said that he lived during the period of the patriarchs. During the patriarchal age, the head of the family also covered the function of offering sacrifices. In other words, he was the priest of his family. (1) So Job, conceived by the writer as living in ...


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Although Paul does not use the same word for 'abolish' as Jesus in Matthew 5:17, I think it helpful to bear that verse in mind, as Paul did not intend to contradict what Jesus says: 17“Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. 18For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth ...


2

The wisemen were not at the manger and Jesus' birth. They came later and found Mary and the baby in a home. At the time of his presentation at the temple, Mary and Joseph had not received the gift from the wiseman. It was probably within two years of his birth that the wiseman found him as Harod killed all the babies, 2 years and under around Bethlehem. ...


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Restatement of the Question: Why was Abel's sacrifice considered 'greater', 'more', or 'above' Cain's? Was it because they were different types of sacrifice, or was there something else at work? Historically, there is a great amount of speculation regarding this passage, but this answer is constrained to Scripture only : Answer 1: Because Cain ...


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The writer of Hebrews analyses why Abel's sacrifice was accepted and Cain's wasn't. Hebrews 11:4 By faith Abel offered to God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain, through which he obtained witness that he was righteous, God testifying of his gifts; and through it he being dead still speaks. The difference between the two sacrifices was that Abel brought ...


1

The consensus view within critical biblical scholarship today seems to be that child sacrifice was practiced in Israelite religion no less than elsewhere in the eastern Mediterranean. Smith summarizes that the idea of child sacrifice “exerted considerable symbolic power across the biblical legal corpus, prophecy and narrative” but was rarely practiced; it ...


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Sarah Iles Johnston (Religions of the Ancient World, page 330) distinguishes the notion of 'offerings' from 'sacrifices'. She says that in the biblical world, sacrifice more typically connotes a specific offering in which blood is poured out. Connected with this is the idea that blood is endowed with a special power. This idea is common to most of the ...


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The Hebrew is ערך and whilst it has a wide semantic domain the basic idea behind the term is arrangement or setting up1, the term does not, therefore, necessitate that wood for the burning of the sacrifice had to set up in a special way, but simply that it needed to be set up. The NET captures this meaning well; 1 Kings 18:33 He arranged the wood, cut up ...


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The law given to Moses at Sinai was abrogated with the advent of the new covenant. To put it a better way: The entirety of the Mosaic Covenant was fulfilled in Christ. The law of Moses no longer serves as direct and immediate judge over the lives and conduct of God's people. God's children today obey the Law of Christ [Gal 6.2, 1 Cor 9:21]. Jesus, who is ...


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I found this and thought it would be useful: Jamieson-Fausset-Brown Bible Commentary (2 Kings 3:27): took his eldest son that should have reigned in his stead, and offered him for a burnt offering, &c.— By this deed of horror, to which the allied army drove the king of Moab, a divine judgment came upon Israel; that is, the besiegers feared the ...



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