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'Clean' (טָהֵר) in Leviticus 16 The Hebrew verb טָהֵר / taher is used consistently throughout the Hebrew Bible in terms of cleansing or purifying, and so in the context of Leviticus 16 the stated meaning is that by performing the described ritual, the High Priest would have his sins cleansed and he would become pure. This ritual purification was required ...


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They were to eat the lamb roasted over fire because it was quick: the same reason they were to eat it with their cloak tucked into their belt, their sandals on their feet and their staff in their hand. “Eat it in haste; it is the LORD's Passover.” (Exodus 12:11) They did not know exactly when the LORD was going to call them out but they were to be prepared ...


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Although Paul does not use the same word for 'abolish' as Jesus in Matthew 5:17, I think it helpful to bear that verse in mind, as Paul did not intend to contradict what Jesus says: 17“Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them. 18For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth ...


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The lamb was to be roasted with fire not eaten raw or boiled. The lamb was to be proportioned between households so that everything would be eaten: …every man shall take a lamb according to their fathers’ house, a lamb for a household. And if the household is too small for a lamb, then he and his nearest neighbor shall take according to the number of ...


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The wisemen were not at the manger and Jesus' birth. They came later and found Mary and the baby in a home. At the time of his presentation at the temple, Mary and Joseph had not received the gift from the wiseman. It was probably within two years of his birth that the wiseman found him as Harod killed all the babies, 2 years and under around Bethlehem. ...


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Leviticus 16 describes the rites of Yom Kippur (aka "The Day of Atonement"). In the first rite Aaron the high priest bathes in a Miktam making his body clean and dons linen underwear, a linen coat, linen sash and a linen turban. This was the garb of a regular priest, not the high priest. The high priest normally wore more decorative attire and an ephod "for ...


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Boiling any animal or fish without dressing it out and washing the meat before cooking by boiling would be a health problem. The danger of fecal matter in the boiling pot would be guaranteed. Without dressing and cleaning the inside of the cavity only cooking on a open fire would the lamb be safe to eat. We are not told if they skinned the animal. Either ...


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I believe that the laws of the Passover sacrifice closely resemble the laws which apply to all of the sacrifices which took place in the ancient Temple. The Passover sacrifice was unique among all the sacrifices in one important way. The commandment to offer the Passover sacririce was given before the Temple (or even the Tabernacle) existed. This means ...


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For it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins. Hebrews 10:4, ESV Hebrews 10:4 means something more than atonement by the phrase 'take away sins'. This verse is in the central section of Hebrews concerning the superiority of the priesthood of Jesus (chapters 8-10). Jeremiah 31 is quoted at length twice in this section which is a ...


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The Brown-Driver-Briggs lexicon for the word “clean” is to be morally clean or purified.[טָהֵר]. The sense is to be ceremonially clean or pure. The first time the word is used is in Genesis. It provides a good picture of how this works: So Jacob said to his household and to all who were with him, “Get rid of the foreign gods you have with you, and ...


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The consensus view within critical biblical scholarship today seems to be that child sacrifice was practiced in Israelite religion no less than elsewhere in the eastern Mediterranean. Smith summarizes that the idea of child sacrifice “exerted considerable symbolic power across the biblical legal corpus, prophecy and narrative” but was rarely practiced; it ...


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Sarah Iles Johnston (Religions of the Ancient World, page 330) distinguishes the notion of 'offerings' from 'sacrifices'. She says that in the biblical world, sacrifice more typically connotes a specific offering in which blood is poured out. Connected with this is the idea that blood is endowed with a special power. This idea is common to most of the ...


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The Hebrew is ערך and whilst it has a wide semantic domain the basic idea behind the term is arrangement or setting up1, the term does not, therefore, necessitate that wood for the burning of the sacrifice had to set up in a special way, but simply that it needed to be set up. The NET captures this meaning well; 1 Kings 18:33 He arranged the wood, cut up ...



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