Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

In support of the human sacrifice theory, Kaiser in Hard Sayings of the Bible says: People, even servants of God, do horrid things. This era was very corrupt and there is no reason to see Jephthah as substantially different than his contemporaries. The sacrifice of his daughter is the most natural way to interpret the text. Gleason Archer (who opposes ...


11

The wise men came after baby Jesus was presented in the temple. If you see a harmony of the Gospels, like Study Resources :: Harmony of the Gospels, you will find that the wise men came long after Jesus was presented in the temple. Presentation in the temple A woman who bore a son was ceremonially unclean for forty days (twice that if she bore a daughter ...


11

There is no mention in the text of dedication or of the tabernacle, and so the main thing recommending an interpretation involving those things is the bewailing of virginity. I won't go so far as to say that a reading of dedication to tabernacle service is completely unwarranted; but I want to give some push back to some of the points in Frank Luke's answer ...


4

Rashi says she was killed: and it was a statute: They decreed that no one should do this anymore (i.e., they publicized that no one should offer a human being), because had Jephthah gone to Phinehas or vice versa, he would have nullified his (i.e., Jephthah’s) vow (i.e., he would have instructed him what the law is in such an instance). However, ...


3

If it meant "cow of soil," פרה would need to be in the genitive, and thus פרת. I don't think the genitive inflection of that word even occurs in scripture.


3

I’m trying to restrict my answer to explaining the text; the full question is perhaps better asked on Jewish Life and Learning. Wiki is flat-out wrong. Psalms 107:22 reads “ויזבחו זבחי תודה” let them offer the sacrifices of thanksgiving; the word זבח unambiguously refers to sacrificial offerings. Psalms 107 is referring to reasons why someone would bring ...


3

The verb in question (ba'ar) is "to set on fire", per the Analytical Key to the Old Testament. Furthermore, the Hebrew is clearly saying "into the fire" (the B in front of the clause is "In" such as "In the beginning") The interesting thing to me in researching this, however, is that the incense that is burned in the previous verse is burned using a ...


3

The Ben Hinom valley appears a number of times in the Tanakh, and is the site of worship for the Molech god. Opinions differ as to how exactly the god was served, but it involves either burning (to death) or singeing. See Gehenna on the location, and Moloch on the practice.


2

"Sacrifice of well-being" = "peace offering" = "הַשְּׁלָמִים". I'm not an expert on this by any means, but at least some of the time an offering of well-being was accompanied by a burnt offering (an הָעֹלָה): 1 And if his offering be a sacrifice of peace-offerings: if he offer of the herd, whether male or female, he shall offer it without blemish before ...


1

Then the king of Moab took his oldest son, who would have been the next king, and sacrificed him as a burnt offering on the wall. So there was great anger against Israel, and the Israelites withdrew and returned to their own land. (2 Kings 3:27, NLT) I'd interpret this as saying that the king sacrificed his son which then fuelled the rage of the ...


1

E. W. Bullinger, an Anglican theologian from the late 18oo's, shares some insightful information regarding this question: "Did Jephtha Really Sacrifice His Daughter: an Analysis of Judges 11:31." Bullinger points out that the verse can read, "“If you deliver the Ammonites into my hands, then whatever comes out of the door of my house to meet me on my safe ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible