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One must remember that the times of Ruth weren't exactly the pinnacle of the feminist movement and therefor women were not regarded as much more than property. As such, there was often a dowry and bride price to be paid for a woman's hand in marriage so Ruth had some worth in this regard. Basically Ruth is part of the estate left behind after the death of ...


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Your question is not a new one, but was asked centuries ago by the rabbis. The answer depends upon whether you are looking for a literal or metaphoric meaning. Ruth 1:22 says: וַתָּשָׁב נָעֳמִי וְרוּת הַמּוֹאֲבִיָּה כַלָּתָהּ עִמָּהּ הַשָּׁבָה מִשְּׂדֵי מוֹאָב וְהֵמָּה בָּאוּ בֵּית לֶחֶם בִּתְחִלַּת קְצִיר שְׂעֹרִים "So Naomi returned, and Ruth ...


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Ruth instigates her right to remarriage to Boaz as the next of kin by uncovering his feet. This imagery of foot uncovering (in the context of the kinsman-redeemer) comes from the Law of Moses - Deuteronomy 25:9 (NASB) 9 Then shall his brother's wife come unto him in the presence of the elders, and loose his shoe from off his foot, and spit in his face, ...


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Shub appears over a thousand times in the Old Testement. Much like our own word "return," it has many, many meanings, both literal and figurative. This is what Strong's Concordance has to say: (7725) A primitive root; to turn back (hence, away) transitively or intransitively, literally or figuratively (not necessarily with the idea of return to the ...


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According to the Babylonian Talmud, Bava Basra 14b, Samuel was the author of the Book of Ruth. While the rabbis, there, equivocate about the authorship of other books of the Hebrew Scriptures, there is no debate there that Samuel authored the book. Modern non-Jewish authorities, however, believe that the book had to be written during or after David's ...



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