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16

Short answer: No. You shouldn't. And that's basically because, to use the quote that is mis-attributed to Freud: "Sometimes a cigar is simply a cigar." It is possible that a literal reading will work fine here. She uncovers his actual feet (and lies down there, in a humble position), which eventually wakes him. Despite being startled (v8) (perhaps by this)...


16

Textual Analysis Grammatical The verbless clause she speaks, מִי־אַ֣תְּ בִּתִּ֑י, is variously translated into English in other ways as well: KJV - Who art thou, my daughter? [The same idea as the JPS quoted in the question] NKJV - Is that you, my daughter? ESV - How did you fare, my daughter? NASB/NIV - How did it go, my daughter? The ...


8

During the 12th Century, Rabbi Abraham ibn Ezra commented on this verse, and his summary was that, in Biblical Hebrew, the "Who" can refer to "What." In colloquial English, the translation would be "What's up with you, my daughter?" The following is the Midrash commentary from Rabbi Abraham ibn Ezra from Sefaria.org followed by the suggested translation. ...


8

Levirate marriage in the Bible predates the legal source you reference in Deuteronomy 25: And Judah said unto Onan: 'Go in unto thy brother's wife, and perform the duty of a husband's brother unto her, and raise up seed to thy brother.' (Genesis 38:8 JPS) Therefore, Boaz's concern with levirate marriage and the keeping of property in the family ...


7

Ruth instigates her right to remarriage to Boaz as the next of kin by uncovering his feet. This imagery of foot uncovering (in the context of the kinsman-redeemer) comes from the Law of Moses - Deuteronomy 25:9 (NASB) 9 Then shall his brother's wife come unto him in the presence of the elders, and loose his shoe from off his foot, and spit in his face, ...


6

The exact reason for Ruth being introduced to the transaction is undetermined in scholarly literature (Expositor's Bible Commentary Introduction to Ruth). Here is one possibility that isn't explicit from Scripture, but I can see the law being interpreted this way. Not only must the land stay in the clan, but it must stay as close within the family as ...


6

Yes, the "narrator" shares Naomi's perception of divine agency ... yet also implicitly challenges Naomi's understanding of her situation. That judgment is based on the following observations: It is more or less a given in the Hebrew Bible that YHWH is the ultimate "agent" beyond which there is no other. Naomi, in claiming with some insistance that her ...


6

Frankly, I also searched for but couldn’t find much of others addressing the parallels of Ruth and Elisha. Walfish was almost always the writer. What I did find were mostly studies of one book that had cross references to the other(s) (e.g. Ruth noting a Kings book or vice versa). For some other material I found, see the comment at the bottom of this ...


5

There is a direct parallel to the Book of Genesis that provides us a clue. In the Book of Genesis Rachel provided to Jacob her maidservant, Bilhah, so that Bilhah could bear proxy children on behalf of Rachel. Genesis 30:3-4 (NASB) 3 She said, “Here is my maid Bilhah, go in to her that she may bear on my knees, that through her I too may have ...


5

This is a brief supplement to the accepted answer. Given the reasonably widespread sense among the more technical commentaries that (a) the face value of the Hebrew is inappropriate, but that (b) mî ("who?") does not mean mah ("what?") or ʾēk ("how?"), it is suprising that no "public" English translation I'm aware of translates this verse satisfactorily. ...


4

Based on the parallel comparison, it looks like most translators render this phrase either something like "Who are you, My daughter?" or "How did things go, my daughter?" This makes it appear that this was a kind of idiom. And so we see that Jan De Waard and Eugene A Nida remark in the the Translator's Handbook on the Book of Ruth: In Hebrew Naomi’s ...


4

Your question is not a new one, but was asked centuries ago by the rabbis. The answer depends upon whether you are looking for a literal or metaphoric meaning. Ruth 1:22 says: וַתָּשָׁב נָעֳמִי וְרוּת הַמּוֹאֲבִיָּה כַלָּתָהּ עִמָּהּ הַשָּׁבָה מִשְּׂדֵי מוֹאָב וְהֵמָּה בָּאוּ בֵּית לֶחֶם בִּתְחִלַּת קְצִיר שְׂעֹרִים "So Naomi returned, and Ruth ...


3

You can if you want, because the Hebrew word for "foot" and "leg" coincide. So she could have been exposing as much of the leg as you desire, including up to the waist. But the connotation of sex is subtle. A similar construction occurs in Judges 5 regarding Ya'el, Chever's wife, Wikisource translation here Between her legs he crouched, fell, lay.(S) ...


2

Shub appears over a thousand times in the Old Testement. Much like our own word "return," it has many, many meanings, both literal and figurative. This is what Strong's Concordance has to say: (7725) A primitive root; to turn back (hence, away) transitively or intransitively, literally or figuratively (not necessarily with the idea of return to the ...


2

According to the Babylonian Talmud, Bava Basra 14b, Samuel was the author of the Book of Ruth. While the rabbis, there, equivocate about the authorship of other books of the Hebrew Scriptures, there is no debate there that Samuel authored the book. Modern non-Jewish authorities, however, believe that the book had to be written during or after David's ...


1

He was paying Naomi for the land, she did not inherit it, but legally possessed it and could sell portions of it. Hooking Ruth up with Boaz was Naomi's way of rewarding her for her devotion and kindness. Considering the land was originally sold because of famine, it's debatable whether anyone managed to make a profit off of it while Elimelech's family was ...


1

I found some interesting conenctions between the two: Both Ruth and Elisha are forceful and determined. Ruth "clung" to Naomi ("At this they wept aloud again. Then Orpah kissed her mother-in-law goodbye, but Ruth clung to her". Ruth 1:14, NIV) and is determined to go with her ("When Naomi realized that Ruth was determined to go with her, she stopped ...



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