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Apparently the Theory is not from Analysis of Pre-Extant Texts If C. Marvin Pate is correct in his Romans commentary statements (no page numbers shown in that Google Book link, but it is under the section where he discusses those verses in the commentary), then the two main reasons this becomes a question at all for this passage has nothing to do with any ...


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Well, there is some ambiguity around the meaning of the phrase τοὺς πτωχοὺς τῶν ἁγίων, although the correct choice appears to be mostly a settled issue among modern translations and commentaries. To define our terms: τοὺς πτωχοὺς = the poor = head noun τῶν ἁγίων = the saints = genitive (in the genitive case as a reflection of its relationship with τοὺς ...


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In Romans 4:1-3, Paul says Abraham was credited as righteous because of his faith, not his works. In 4:14, he says that if those who adhere to the law are the heirs, as Jews believed, then faith is null and the promise God made to Abraham is void, then in 4:15 that without the law we can not transgress against it. He goes on to say that it is by faith ...


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This answer us copied from another similar question: What is the "evil" Paul keeps doing in Romans 7:19? Although Paul is not specific about the "evils" he practiced, (vs 19.) we know that they were a culmination of sins that were counter to his mindful desires not to do them, but did them as a result of a mind vs. flesh struggle. To be more ...


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Although Paul is not specific about the "evils" he practiced, (vs 19.) we know that they were a culmination of sins that were counter to his mindful desires not to do them, but did them as a result of a mind vs. flesh struggle. To be more specific it's necessary to examine the context of Romans chapter 7. Romans chapter 7 verses 7-25 are the subject of much ...


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paul, like each christian struggled with having a new creation mind and spirit, living in a body that was once run by the old order of sin and law. whether it was habitual practices themselves or only in thinking, he now knows the real difference between right and wrong from Gods point of view, and in in his spirit and mind he agrees...his will has yet to ...


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To start, I suppose we have to agree that we have at least two aspects of "being." One is the physical body and the other is our spirit. The soul may fit in here somewhere but that is another topic, I think. Our body is clearly not changed when we become reconciled to God through Christ. But our spirit is. This is key. The spirit goes from having a sinful ...


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I believe that in the first part of the sentence, where Paul states, "For what I do is not the good I want to do;" means that the good Paul does, is doing the Will of God, not the "good" which "I" want to do. "I" is incapable of doing good, because only God is good. In the second half, Paul states, "... no, the evil I do not want to do--this I keep on ...


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Paul is referring to the universality of condemnation of sin of both Jews and gentiles. Condemnation for the Jews being one under the law and its demands, the gentiles be estranged or apart from the law and its demands. One question Paul answers in this verse is: How are gentiles who were "apart from the law" Judged? The answer to this is given in Romans ...



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